IRISH USQUEBAUGH

1 gallon French brandy (or more)
1 lb. seedless raisins
1/4 lb. figs
1/2 oz. saffron
1 dram musk (1/8 or 1/16 oz)
1 oz. licorice root
1 oz. fennel seed
1 oz anise seed
2 drams coriander seed (1/4 or 1/8 oz.)

To every Gallon of French-Brandy, put one Ounce of Liquorice sliced, one Ounce of sweet Fennel-Seeds, one Ounce of Anisseeds, one Pound of Raisins of the Sun split and stoned, a quarter of a Pound of Figs split, two Drachms of Coriander-seeds; let these infuse [soak] about eight or nine Days, and pour the Liquor clear off, then add half an Ounce of Saffron, in a Bag, for a Day or two, and when that is out, put in a Drachm of Musk. If when this Composition is made it seems to be too high a Cordial for the Stomach, put to it more Brandy, till you reduce it to the Temper you like. This is the same Receipt King William had when he was in Ireland.
From The Country Housewife and Lady's Director, by R. Bradley, 1736. Reprinted in A Sip Through Time by Cindy Renfrow.



USQUEBAUGH, THE IRISH CORDIAL


2 quarts brandy or whisky
1/2 ounce whole nutmegs
1/4 ounce cardamom
1 lb raisins
sugar lumps
1/4 ounce cloves
peel of 1 Seville orange
saffron OR spinach juice

To two quarts of the best brandy, or whisky without a smoky taste, put a pound of stoned [pitted] raisins, a half-ounce of nutmegs, a quarter-ounce of cloves, the same quantity of cardamoms, all bruised in a mortar; the rind of a Seville orange, rubbed off on lumps of sugar, a little tincture of saffron and a half-pound of brown candy-sugar. Shake the infusion every day for a fortnight [two weeks], and filter it for use. Not a drop of water must be put to Irish cordial. It is sometimes tinged of a fine green with the juice of spinage [spinach], instead of the saffron tint, from which it takes the name (as we conjecture) of usquebah, or yellow-water.
From The Cook and Housewife's Manual, by Mistress Margaret Dods, 1829. Reprinted in A Sip Through Time by Cindy Renfrow.



GIN AND TANSY


1 bottle gin
Tansy *see note*

*Note: Tansy is a bitter plant of dubious healthful qualities. Use bitters.

Fill a quart decanter one-third full of tansy, and pour in gin to fill up the balance. Serve to customer in a wine glass.
From Bon-Vivant's Companion,  Jerry Thomas, 1862.



MRS. LEE'S EGGNOG


10 eggs, separated
2 c. sugar
2 1/2 c. brandy
1/4 c. and 1 tsp. dark rum
8 c. (1/2 gallon) milk, half-and-half, or cream

Editor's Note: After this is mixed it needs to "ripen" in a cold but not freezing place. An unheated room or porch was the common location for Mrs. Lee but a refrigerator is probably more plausible today.

Beat the yolks of 10 eggs very light [in color, meaning they are very well blended], add 1 lb. of sugar--stir in slowly two tumblers of French brandy--1/4 tumbler of rum--add 2 qts. new milk--& last the whites beaten light [very fluffy].
From The Robert E. Lee Family Cooking and Housekeeping Book, by Anne Carter Zimmer. Recipe from the collection of Mary (Mrs. Robert E.) Lee, date unknown.



IMPERIAL RASPBERRY WHISKEY PUNCH


2 gallons whiskey
1 gallon raspberry syrup
5 ounces sweet almonds
5 ounces bitter almonds
1 and 1/4 ounce powdered cinnamon
1/3 ounce powdered cloves
5 ounces plain syrup

Boil the almonds in water, then skin. Add the cinnamon, cloves and plain syrup and macerate [chop or mash] fine. Add to 7 gallons of water and boil for five minutes, then strain. Add 2 gallons of whiskey and one gallon of raspberry syrup.
From Manual for the Manufacture of Cordials, Liquors, Fancy Syrups, &tc. by Christian Schultz, 1862. Reprinted in Authentic Drinks of the Civil War Era, Sharon Peregrine Johnson and Byron Johnson, editors.



GLASGOW PUNCH


1 part old Jamaica rum
5 parts "Sherbert"
2 limes
Juice of 2 lemons
1 tbs. sugar

As to the beautiful mutual adaptation of cold rum and cold water, that is beyond all praise, being one of Nature's most exquisite achievements. Melt lump-sugar in cold water, with the juice of a couple of lemons. Pass it through a fine hair strainer. This mixture is called "sherbert," and must be well mingled. Then add old Jamaica rum--one part of rum to five of sherbert. Cut a couple of limes in two, and run each section rapidly around the edge of the jug or bowl, gently squeezing in some of the delicate acid. This done, the punch is made. Imbibe.
From Bon-Vivant's Companion by Jerry Thomas, 1862.



NECTAR PUNCH FOR BOTTLING


4 1/2 pints rum
Juice and rinds of 15 lemons
2 qts. boiling hot milk
2 qts. cold water
2 1/2 lb. sugar
1 grated nutmeg

Infuse the peel of fifteen lemons in a pint and a half of rum for forty-eight hours. Add two quarts of cold
water with three additional pints of rum, the juice of the lemons, two quarts of boiling hot milk, and one
grated nutmeg. Let the mixture stand twenty-four hours, covered close. Then add and mix two and a half pounds of loaf sugar. Strain this through a flannel bag till quite fine, and bottle it for use. It is fit to use as soon as bottled.
From Bon-Vivant's Companion, by Jerry Thomas, 1862.



MISSISSIPPI PUNCH

(For a Single Serving)

1 wine glass brandy
1/2 wine glass Jamaica rum
1/2 wine glass bourbon whiskey
1/2 wine glass water
1/4 large lemon
1 and 1/2 tbs. powdered white sugar

Place the above in a large tumbler filled with shaved ice. Shake well, and to those who like their draughts
"like linked sweetness long drawn out," let them use a glass tube or a straw to sip the nectar through. The top of this punch should be ornamented with small pieces of orange, and berries in season. For a large party, multiply the above by the number of imbibers and mix in a punch bowl.
From Bon-Vivant's Companion by Jerry Thomas, 1862.


LA PATRIA PUNCH


3 bottles iced champagne
1 bottle cognac
6 oranges
1 pineapple

Slice the oranges and pineapple into a bowl, pour the Cognac over them and let them seep for a couple of hours, then, in with the champagne and serve immediately.
From Bon-Vivant's Companion, Jerry Thomas, 1862



MILK PUNCH-ENGLISH


Juice of 6 lemons
Rind of 2 lemons
1 pound sugar
1 peeled, sliced and pounded Pineapple
6 cloves
20 coriander seeds
1 small cinnamon stick
1 pint brandy
1 pint rum
1 gill [1/2 c.] arrack
1 c. strong green tea
1 quart boiling water

Put the ingredients into a very clean pitcher, in the order given. Cork this down to prevent evaporation, and allow these ingredients to seep for at least six hours. Then add a quart of hot milk and the juice of two lemons, mix, and filter through a jelly bag. When the punch is past bright, put it away in tightly corked bottles. This punch is intended to be iced for drinking.
From Bon Vivant's Companion, Jerry Thomas, 1862.



HOT IRISH PUNCH


1 wine glass Irish whiskey
2 wine glasses boiling water
1 tbs. fine sugar
Rind and juice of 1 lemon (optional)

This is the genuine Irish beverage. Combine one wine glass Irish whiskey with one tablespoon of fine sugar dissolved in two wine glasses of boiling water. If [making] lemon punch, the rind is rubbed on the sugar, and a small proportion of [lemon] juice is added before the whiskey is poured in.
From Bon-Vivant's Companion by Jerry Thomas, 1862.



CHERRY SHRUB


1 quart sour cherries, pitted
1 lb. sugar
Brandy, or Irish or Monongahela Whiskey

Pick ripe acid [sour] cherries from the stem and put them in an earthen pot. Place that in an iron pot of water and boil till the juice is extracted. Strain the juice through a cloth thick enough to retain the pulp and sweeten it to your taste. When perfectly clear, bottle it, sealing the cork. By first putting a gill [1/2 cup] of brandy into each bottle, it will keep through the summer. It is delicious mixed with water. Irish or Monongahela whiskey will answer instead of the brandy, though not as good.
From Bon-Vivant's Companion, Jerry Thomas, 1862



LOCOMOTIVE


1 pint Burgundy wine
1 liqueur glass [about 1/2 cup] Curacao
Yolks of 2 eggs
1 oz. honey
Essence of cloves

Put two yolks of eggs into a goblet with an ounce of honey, a little essence of cloves, and a liqueur glass of Curacao. Add a pint of high Burgundy made hot, whisk well together, and serve hot in glasses.
From Bon Vivant's Companion, Jerry Thomas, 1862.

[Note: One source for this recipes says that this is "A delightful drink reminiscent of a slightly thick, sweet sangria heavy on the orange juice." They suggest Cointreau as an alternative if Curacao is hard to come by, Grand Marnier would probably work but is a tad expensive.[

COLUMBIA SKIN


1/2 c. scotch whiskey
1 piece lemon

Place the above in a small bar glass and fill it one-half full of boiling water. This is a Boston drink.
From The Bon-Vivant's Companion, Jerry Thomas, 1862



BARBADOS LEMON PUNCH


1 1/2 c. brown sugar
2 c. fresh lemon juice
4 c. dark rum
2 cups brandy

The Juice of 3 good lemons--2 small Coffee Cups rum sweetened as for toddy (1 pound brown sugar to each Gallon of spirit), the same of Fr. [French] brandy and white sugar to your taste will make 3 qts.
Punch. 5 good Limes equal to 3 Lemons.
From the Tucker Family Cookbook circa 1800, reprinted in Hearthside Cooking by Nancy Carter Crump.



RASPBERRY WINE


Raspberries
1 lb. sugar
2 qt. sherry

Bruise the finest ripe raspberries with the back of a spoon; strain them through a flannel bag into a stone
jar; allow one pound of fine powdered loaf-sugar to one quart of juice; stir
these well together, and cover the jar closely; let it stand three days, stirring the mixture up every day;
them pour off the clear liquid, and put two quarts of sherry to each quart of juice, or liquid. Bottle it off,
and it will be fit for use in a fortnight [two weeks]. By adding Cognac brandy instead of sherry, the
mixture will be raspberry brandy.
From Civil War Recipes: Receipts from the Pages of Godey's Lady's Book, Lily May Spaulding and John Spaulding, editors. Recipe from 1860, 1861, and 1862.



BLACKBERRY AND WINE CORDIAL

1/2 bushel blackberries
1/4 lb allspice
2 oz. cinnamon
2 oz. cloves
1 lb. sugar
1/2 gal. Cognac brandy

To half a bushel of blackberries, well mashed, add a quarter of a pound of allspice, two ounces of cinnamon, two ounces of cloves; pulverize well, mix, and boil slowly until properly done; then strain or squeeze the juice through homespun or flannel, and add to each pint of the juice one pound of loaf-sugar; boil again for some time, take it off, and, while cooling, add half a gallon of best Cognac brandy. Bottle and cork well. Dose: For an adult, half a gill to a gill; for a child, a teaspoonful or more, according to age.
This is recommended as a delightful beverage, and an infallible specific for diarrhoea or ordinary disease of the bowels.
From Civil War Recipes: Receipts from the Pages of Godey's Lady's Book, Lily May Spaulding and John Spaulding, editors.



ASSES' MILK


1/4 c. rum
1 bottle aerated lemonade

Editors [Johnson's] note: Asses "milk" is the polite name for this beverage. Combining golden rum and yellow lemonade may yield a beverage similar in color to a donkey byproduct--but not milk!

Combine the above ingredients in a mixing glass, two thirds full of fine [crushed] ice. Stir and strain into a large bar glass.
From Cooling Cups and Dainty Drinks, 1869



JAPANESE COCKTAIL

(Use a Small Bar Glass)

1 tbs. Orgeat Syrup*
1/2 tsp. Bogart's Bitters**
1 wine glass [about 3/4 c.] Brandy
1 or 2 pieces lemon peel

Fill the tumbler one third with ice, and stir well with a spoon.

* "Orgeat syrup" is a sugar syrup flavored with almond extract.
**Bogart's was a competitor of the Angostura Bitters company. As Bogart is no longer around, use Angostura.
From The Authentic Guide to Drinks of the Civil War Era , Sharon Peregrine Johnston and
Byron A. Johnston, editors. Recipe from 1862.




ANNISEED CORDIAL


2 quarts white brandy
2 quarts water
1 lb sugar
Optional:
Powdered cochineal dissolved in brandy
1 tbs. oil of anise seed or clove oil or cinnamon oil


Melt a pound of loaf-sugar in two quarts of water. Mix it with two quarts of white brandy, and add a
tablespoonful of oil of anniseed. Let it stand a week; then filter it through white blotting paper, and bottle it for use. Clove or Cinnamon Cordial may be made in the same manner, by mixing sugar, water and brandy, and adding oil of cinnamon or oil of cloves. You may colour any of these cordials red by stirring in a little powdered cochineal that has been dissolved in a small quantity of brandy.
From Seventy-Five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes and Sweetmeats, by Miss [Eliza] Leslie, 1838



ELDER[BERRY] WINE


3 gallons water
1 peck elderberries
3 lb. sugar
1/2 oz. ground ginger
6 cloves
1 lb. raisins
1/4 pint brandy
1 tbs. brewer's yeast

To every 3 gallons of water allow 1 peck of elderberries; to every gallon of juice allow 3 lb. of sugar, 1/2 oz of ground ginger, 6 cloves, 1 lb of good Turkey raisins; 1/4 pint brandy to every gallon of wine. To every 9 gallons of wine 3 or 4 tablespoonfuls of fresh brewer's yeast.
Mode--Pour the water, quite boiling, on the elderberries, which should be picked from the stalks, and let
these stand covered for 24 hours, then strain the whole through a sieve or bag, breaking the fruit to express all the juice from it. Measure the liquor, and to every gallon allow the
above proportion of sugar. Boil the juice and sugar with the
ginger, cloves, and raisins for 1 hour, skimming the liquor the whole time; let it stand until milk-warm, then put it into a clean dry cask, with 3 or 4 tablespoonfuls of good fresh yeast to
every 9 gallons of wine. Let it ferment for about a fortnight [two weeks]; then add the brandy, bung up the cask, and let it stand some months before it is bottled, when it will be found excellent. A bunch of hops suspended to a string from the bung, some persons say, will preserve the wine good for several years. Elder wine is usual mulled [heated], and served with snippets of toasted bread and a little grated nutmeg. Make this in September.
From Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management, 1861.



BLACKBERRY WINE


Blackberries
1 qt. boiling water
2 lb. sugar

The Spauldings note that "Blackberries are usually ripe in late July and August, so the wine should stand for about three months."

The following is said to be an excellent receipt for the manufacture of superior wine from blackberries:
Measure your berries and bruise them, to every gallon adding one quart of boiling water; let the mixture
stand for twenty-four hours, stirring occasionally; then strain off the liquor into a cask, to every gallon
adding two pounds of sugar; cork tight, and let stand till following October, and you will have wine ready for use, without any further straining or boiling, that will make lips smack as they never smacked, under similar influence, before.
From Civil War Recipes: Receipts from the Pages of Godey's Lady's Book, Lily May Spaulding and John Spaulding, editors. Recipe published in 1860, 1861, AND 1862. It was evidently popular.



WATER-MELON SHERBET

1 watermelon
White sugar
3/4 c. rosewater
1 1/2 c. sherry

Note: Sherbet clearly had a somewhat different meaning in 1863 from what it does today.

Let the melon be cut in half, and the inside of the fruit be worked up and mashed with a spoon, till it assumes the consistency of a thick pulp. Introduce into this as much pounded white candy or sugar as
may suit your taste, a wineglassful of fresh rose-water, and two wineglasses of sherry. Pour when strained, the contents into a jug and fill your tumblers as often as needed. This makes a very agreeable drink in summer.
From Civil War Recipes: Receipts from the Pages of Godey's Lady's Book, Lily May Spaulding
and John Spaulding, editors. Recipe from 1863.

IRISH USQUEBAUGH


1 gallon French brandy (or more)
1 lb. seedless raisins
1/4 lb. figs
1/2 oz. saffron
1 dram musk (1/8 or 1/16 oz)
1 oz. licorice root
1 oz. fennel seed
1 oz anise seed
2 drams coriander seed (1/4 or 1/8 oz.)

To every Gallon of French-Brandy, put one Ounce of Liquorice sliced, one Ounce of sweet Fennel-Seeds, one Ounce of Anisseeds, one Pound of Raisins of the Sun split and stoned, a quarter of a Pound of Figs split, two Drachms of Coriander-seeds; let these infuse [soak] about eight or nine Days, and pour the Liquor clear off, then add half an Ounce of Saffron, in a Bag, for a Day or two, and when that is out, put in a Drachm of Musk. If when this Composition is made it seems to be too high a Cordial for the Stomach, put to it more Brandy, till you reduce it to the Temper you like. This is the same Receipt King William had when he was in Ireland.
From The Country Housewife and Lady's Director, by R. Bradley, 1736. Reprinted in A Sip Through Time by Cindy Renfrow.



USQUEBAUGH, THE IRISH CORDIAL


2 quarts brandy or whisky
1/2 ounce whole nutmegs
1/4 ounce cardamom
1 lb raisins
sugar lumps
1/4 ounce cloves
peel of 1 Seville orange
saffron OR spinach juice

To two quarts of the best brandy, or whisky without a smoky taste, put a pound of stoned [pitted] raisins, a half-ounce of nutmegs, a quarter-ounce of cloves, the same quantity of cardamoms, all bruised in a mortar; the rind of a Seville orange, rubbed off on lumps of sugar, a little tincture of saffron and a half-pound of brown candy-sugar. Shake the infusion every day for a fortnight [two weeks], and filter it for use. Not a drop of water must be put to Irish cordial. It is sometimes tinged of a fine green with the juice of spinage [spinach], instead of the saffron tint, from which it takes the name (as we conjecture) of usquebah, or yellow-water.
From The Cook and Housewife's Manual, by Mistress Margaret Dods, 1829. Reprinted in A Sip Through Time by Cindy Renfrow.



GIN AND TANSY


1 bottle gin
Tansy *see note*

*Note: Tansy is a bitter plant of dubious healthful qualities. Use bitters.

Fill a quart decanter one-third full of tansy, and pour in gin to fill up the balance. Serve to customer in a wine glass.
From Bon-Vivant's Companion,  Jerry Thomas, 1862.



MRS. LEE'S EGGNOG


10 eggs, separated
2 c. sugar
2 1/2 c. brandy
1/4 c. and 1 tsp. dark rum
8 c. (1/2 gallon) milk, half-and-half, or cream

Editor's Note: After this is mixed it needs to "ripen" in a cold but not freezing place. An unheated room or porch was the common location for Mrs. Lee but a refrigerator is probably more plausible today.

Beat the yolks of 10 eggs very light [in color, meaning they are very well blended], add 1 lb. of sugar--stir in slowly two tumblers of French brandy--1/4 tumbler of rum--add 2 qts. new milk--& last the whites beaten light [very fluffy].
From The Robert E. Lee Family Cooking and Housekeeping Book, by Anne Carter Zimmer. Recipe from the collection of Mary (Mrs. Robert E.) Lee, date unknown.



IMPERIAL RASPBERRY WHISKEY PUNCH


2 gallons whiskey
1 gallon raspberry syrup
5 ounces sweet almonds
5 ounces bitter almonds
1 and 1/4 ounce powdered cinnamon
1/3 ounce powdered cloves
5 ounces plain syrup

Boil the almonds in water, then skin. Add the cinnamon, cloves and plain syrup and macerate [chop or mash] fine. Add to 7 gallons of water and boil for five minutes, then strain. Add 2 gallons of whiskey and one gallon of raspberry syrup.
From Manual for the Manufacture of Cordials, Liquors, Fancy Syrups, &tc. by Christian Schultz, 1862. Reprinted in Authentic Drinks of the Civil War Era, Sharon Peregrine Johnson and Byron Johnson, editors.



GLASGOW PUNCH


1 part old Jamaica rum
5 parts "Sherbert"
2 limes
Juice of 2 lemons
1 tbs. sugar

As to the beautiful mutual adaptation of cold rum and cold water, that is beyond all praise, being one of Nature's most exquisite achievements. Melt lump-sugar in cold water, with the juice of a couple of lemons. Pass it through a fine hair strainer. This mixture is called "sherbert," and must be well mingled. Then add old Jamaica rum--one part of rum to five of sherbert. Cut a couple of limes in two, and run each section rapidly around the edge of the jug or bowl, gently squeezing in some of the delicate acid. This done, the punch is made. Imbibe.
From Bon-Vivant's Companion by Jerry Thomas, 1862.



NECTAR PUNCH FOR BOTTLING


4 1/2 pints rum
Juice and rinds of 15 lemons
2 qts. boiling hot milk
2 qts. cold water
2 1/2 lb. sugar
1 grated nutmeg

Infuse the peel of fifteen lemons in a pint and a half of rum for forty-eight hours. Add two quarts of cold
water with three additional pints of rum, the juice of the lemons, two quarts of boiling hot milk, and one
grated nutmeg. Let the mixture stand twenty-four hours, covered close. Then add and mix two and a half pounds of loaf sugar. Strain this through a flannel bag till quite fine, and bottle it for use. It is fit to use as soon as bottled.
From Bon-Vivant's Companion, by Jerry Thomas, 1862.



MISSISSIPPI PUNCH

(For a Single Serving)

1 wine glass brandy
1/2 wine glass Jamaica rum
1/2 wine glass bourbon whiskey
1/2 wine glass water
1/4 large lemon
1 and 1/2 tbs. powdered white sugar

Place the above in a large tumbler filled with shaved ice. Shake well, and to those who like their draughts
"like linked sweetness long drawn out," let them use a glass tube or a straw to sip the nectar through. The top of this punch should be ornamented with small pieces of orange, and berries in season. For a large party, multiply the above by the number of imbibers and mix in a punch bowl.
From Bon-Vivant's Companion by Jerry Thomas, 1862.


LA PATRIA PUNCH


3 bottles iced champagne
1 bottle cognac
6 oranges
1 pineapple

Slice the oranges and pineapple into a bowl, pour the Cognac over them and let them seep for a couple of hours, then, in with the champagne and serve immediately.
From Bon-Vivant's Companion, Jerry Thomas, 1862



MILK PUNCH-ENGLISH


Juice of 6 lemons
Rind of 2 lemons
1 pound sugar
1 peeled, sliced and pounded Pineapple
6 cloves
20 coriander seeds
1 small cinnamon stick
1 pint brandy
1 pint rum
1 gill [1/2 c.] arrack
1 c. strong green tea
1 quart boiling water

Put the ingredients into a very clean pitcher, in the order given. Cork this down to prevent evaporation, and allow these ingredients to seep for at least six hours. Then add a quart of hot milk and the juice of two lemons, mix, and filter through a jelly bag. When the punch is past bright, put it away in tightly corked bottles. This punch is intended to be iced for drinking.
From Bon Vivant's Companion, Jerry Thomas, 1862.



HOT IRISH PUNCH


1 wine glass Irish whiskey
2 wine glasses boiling water
1 tbs. fine sugar
Rind and juice of 1 lemon (optional)

This is the genuine Irish beverage. Combine one wine glass Irish whiskey with one tablespoon of fine sugar dissolved in two wine glasses of boiling water. If [making] lemon punch, the rind is rubbed on the sugar, and a small proportion of [lemon] juice is added before the whiskey is poured in.
From Bon-Vivant's Companion by Jerry Thomas, 1862.



CHERRY SHRUB


1 quart sour cherries, pitted
1 lb. sugar
Brandy, or Irish or Monongahela Whiskey

Pick ripe acid [sour] cherries from the stem and put them in an earthen pot. Place that in an iron pot of water and boil till the juice is extracted. Strain the juice through a cloth thick enough to retain the pulp and sweeten it to your taste. When perfectly clear, bottle it, sealing the cork. By first putting a gill [1/2 cup] of brandy into each bottle, it will keep through the summer. It is delicious mixed with water. Irish or Monongahela whiskey will answer instead of the brandy, though not as good.
From Bon-Vivant's Companion, Jerry Thomas, 1862



LOCOMOTIVE


1 pint Burgundy wine
1 liqueur glass [about 1/2 cup] Curacao
Yolks of 2 eggs
1 oz. honey
Essence of cloves

Put two yolks of eggs into a goblet with an ounce of honey, a little essence of cloves, and a liqueur glass of Curacao. Add a pint of high Burgundy made hot, whisk well together, and serve hot in glasses.
From Bon Vivant's Companion, Jerry Thomas, 1862.

[Note: One source for this recipes says that this is "A delightful drink reminiscent of a slightly thick, sweet sangria heavy on the orange juice." They suggest Cointreau as an alternative if Curacao is hard to come by, Grand Marnier would probably work but is a tad expensive.[

COLUMBIA SKIN


1/2 c. scotch whiskey
1 piece lemon

Place the above in a small bar glass and fill it one-half full of boiling water. This is a Boston drink.
From The Bon-Vivant's Companion, Jerry Thomas, 1862



BARBADOS LEMON PUNCH


1 1/2 c. brown sugar
2 c. fresh lemon juice
4 c. dark rum
2 cups brandy

The Juice of 3 good lemons--2 small Coffee Cups rum sweetened as for toddy (1 pound brown sugar to each Gallon of spirit), the same of Fr. [French] brandy and white sugar to your taste will make 3 qts.
Punch. 5 good Limes equal to 3 Lemons.
From the Tucker Family Cookbook circa 1800, reprinted in Hearthside Cooking by Nancy Carter Crump.



RASPBERRY WINE


Raspberries
1 lb. sugar
2 qt. sherry

Bruise the finest ripe raspberries with the back of a spoon; strain them through a flannel bag into a stone
jar; allow one pound of fine powdered loaf-sugar to one quart of juice; stir
these well together, and cover the jar closely; let it stand three days, stirring the mixture up every day;
them pour off the clear liquid, and put two quarts of sherry to each quart of juice, or liquid. Bottle it off,
and it will be fit for use in a fortnight [two weeks]. By adding Cognac brandy instead of sherry, the
mixture will be raspberry brandy.
From Civil War Recipes: Receipts from the Pages of Godey's Lady's Book, Lily May Spaulding and John Spaulding, editors. Recipe from 1860, 1861, and 1862.



BLACKBERRY AND WINE CORDIAL

1/2 bushel blackberries
1/4 lb allspice
2 oz. cinnamon
2 oz. cloves
1 lb. sugar
1/2 gal. Cognac brandy

To half a bushel of blackberries, well mashed, add a quarter of a pound of allspice, two ounces of cinnamon, two ounces of cloves; pulverize well, mix, and boil slowly until properly done; then strain or squeeze the juice through homespun or flannel, and add to each pint of the juice one pound of loaf-sugar; boil again for some time, take it off, and, while cooling, add half a gallon of best Cognac brandy. Bottle and cork well. Dose: For an adult, half a gill to a gill; for a child, a teaspoonful or more, according to age.
This is recommended as a delightful beverage, and an infallible specific for diarrhoea or ordinary disease of the bowels.
From Civil War Recipes: Receipts from the Pages of Godey's Lady's Book, Lily May Spaulding and John Spaulding, editors.



ASSES' MILK


1/4 c. rum
1 bottle aerated lemonade

Editors [Johnson's] note: Asses "milk" is the polite name for this beverage. Combining golden rum and yellow lemonade may yield a beverage similar in color to a donkey byproduct--but not milk!

Combine the above ingredients in a mixing glass, two thirds full of fine [crushed] ice. Stir and strain into a large bar glass.
From Cooling Cups and Dainty Drinks, 1869



JAPANESE COCKTAIL

(Use a Small Bar Glass)

1 tbs. Orgeat Syrup*
1/2 tsp. Bogart's Bitters**
1 wine glass [about 3/4 c.] Brandy
1 or 2 pieces lemon peel

Fill the tumbler one third with ice, and stir well with a spoon.

* "Orgeat syrup" is a sugar syrup flavored with almond extract.
**Bogart's was a competitor of the Angostura Bitters company. As Bogart is no longer around, use Angostura.
From The Authentic Guide to Drinks of the Civil War Era , Sharon Peregrine Johnston and
Byron A. Johnston, editors. Recipe from 1862.




ANNISEED CORDIAL


2 quarts white brandy
2 quarts water
1 lb sugar
Optional:
Powdered cochineal dissolved in brandy
1 tbs. oil of anise seed or clove oil or cinnamon oil


Melt a pound of loaf-sugar in two quarts of water. Mix it with two quarts of white brandy, and add a
tablespoonful of oil of anniseed. Let it stand a week; then filter it through white blotting paper, and bottle it for use. Clove or Cinnamon Cordial may be made in the same manner, by mixing sugar, water and brandy, and adding oil of cinnamon or oil of cloves. You may colour any of these cordials red by stirring in a little powdered cochineal that has been dissolved in a small quantity of brandy.
From Seventy-Five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes and Sweetmeats, by Miss [Eliza] Leslie, 1838



ELDER[BERRY] WINE


3 gallons water
1 peck elderberries
3 lb. sugar
1/2 oz. ground ginger
6 cloves
1 lb. raisins
1/4 pint brandy
1 tbs. brewer's yeast

To every 3 gallons of water allow 1 peck of elderberries; to every gallon of juice allow 3 lb. of sugar, 1/2 oz of ground ginger, 6 cloves, 1 lb of good Turkey raisins; 1/4 pint brandy to every gallon of wine. To every 9 gallons of wine 3 or 4 tablespoonfuls of fresh brewer's yeast.
Mode--Pour the water, quite boiling, on the elderberries, which should be picked from the stalks, and let
these stand covered for 24 hours, then strain the whole through a sieve or bag, breaking the fruit to express all the juice from it. Measure the liquor, and to every gallon allow the
above proportion of sugar. Boil the juice and sugar with the
ginger, cloves, and raisins for 1 hour, skimming the liquor the whole time; let it stand until milk-warm, then put it into a clean dry cask, with 3 or 4 tablespoonfuls of good fresh yeast to
every 9 gallons of wine. Let it ferment for about a fortnight [two weeks]; then add the brandy, bung up the cask, and let it stand some months before it is bottled, when it will be found excellent. A bunch of hops suspended to a string from the bung, some persons say, will preserve the wine good for several years. Elder wine is usual mulled [heated], and served with snippets of toasted bread and a little grated nutmeg. Make this in September.
From Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management, 1861.



BLACKBERRY WINE


Blackberries
1 qt. boiling water
2 lb. sugar

The Spauldings note that "Blackberries are usually ripe in late July and August, so the wine should stand for about three months."

The following is said to be an excellent receipt for the manufacture of superior wine from blackberries:
Measure your berries and bruise them, to every gallon adding one quart of boiling water; let the mixture
stand for twenty-four hours, stirring occasionally; then strain off the liquor into a cask, to every gallon
adding two pounds of sugar; cork tight, and let stand till following October, and you will have wine ready for use, without any further straining or boiling, that will make lips smack as they never smacked, under similar influence, before.
From Civil War Recipes: Receipts from the Pages of Godey's Lady's Book, Lily May Spaulding and John Spaulding, editors. Recipe published in 1860, 1861, AND 1862. It was evidently popular.



WATER-MELON SHERBET

1 watermelon
White sugar
3/4 c. rosewater
1 1/2 c. sherry

Note: Sherbet clearly had a somewhat different meaning in 1863 from what it does today.

Let the melon be cut in half, and the inside of the fruit be worked up and mashed with a spoon, till it assumes the consistency of a thick pulp. Introduce into this as much pounded white candy or sugar as
may suit your taste, a wineglassful of fresh rose-water, and two wineglasses of sherry. Pour when strained, the contents into a jug and fill your tumblers as often as needed. This makes a very agreeable drink in summer.
From Civil War Recipes: Receipts from the Pages of Godey's Lady's Book, Lily May Spaulding
and John Spaulding, editors. Recipe from 1863.

 

 



 

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