CWi Guide to Civil War Blogs

 

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Charge! Charge! Civil War Wargaming & News 
Scott Mingus' site caters to what you would think was an incredibly tiny audience: players of non-computer tabletop war games played with elaborate scale model figures and fields. But the blog is fun to read even if you wouldn't know a 15mm from a hole in the ground. Periods other than the Civil War are covered here and actually a computer game or two occasionally merits a post as well. Scott Mingus' site caters to what you would think was an incredibly tiny audience: players of non-computer tabletop war games played with elaborate scale model figures and fields. But the blog is fun to read even if you wouldn't know a 15mm from a hole in the ground. Periods other than the Civil War are covered here and actually a computer game or two occasionally merits a post as well.  

 

Civil War Bookshelf Civil War Bookshelf 
Dmitri Rotov has a site which is almost impossible to categorize. He reads and has read. Widely. Then he thinks, and then he writes (activities which, alas, do not always occur together or in that order.)  He doesn't allow comments, and every so often explains why, and why he doesn't think other sites should either. You will probably not agree with his reasoning. He almost certainly doesn't care.

 

Civil War Cavalry  CivilWarCavalry.com 
Eric Wittenberg writes about Cavalry, primarily Union, with a heavy concentration in recent years on operations in and around, and before and after, Gettysburg. The occasional post on politics, Judaism and baseball will be featured, and the subject of amateur- versus professional historians is a frequent subject of discussion. Eric Wittenberg writes about Cavalry, primarily Union, with a heavy concentration in recent years on operations in and around, and before and after, Gettysburg. The occasional post on politics, Judaism and baseball will be featured, and the subject of amateur- versus professional historians is a frequent subject of discussion.  

 

Civil War History Civil War History
Daniel Sauerwein is the principal blogger here, with the recent addition of co-author Billy Whyte. A wide range of topics are covered as the authors' inclinations see fit, from a long analysis of a battle to a brief mention of an item recently in the news. An enjoyable site for "general reading" if you will, if time forbids reading absolutely everything and one has no particular field of specialized interest like cavalry or navy.

 

Civil War Librarian Civil War Librarian
Rea Andrew Redd is, conveniently enough, a librarian of the academic sort in real life, so this blog is a convenient extension. A heavy Gettysburg focus is evident, including news stories from local media, book reviews, and the ongoing saga of his pursuit of the coveted title of Licensed Battlefield Guide at the venerated park. While GB-centric the blog covers other areas and issues as well, including books and looks at unusual subjects.

 

Civil War Medicine Civil War Medicine (& Writing)
Jim Schmidt is also the author of a regular column on the subject of Civil War Medicine in another publication, which columns often find their way to this blog as publication schedules permit. Other posts of the honorable name of "shameless self promotion" pertain to his other books, particularly the latest which is on the topic of companies still in business today which were around in Civil War times.

 

Civil War Memory Civil War Memory
Kevin Levin teaches at a private high school of exceptionally high caliber in Virginia, and he blogs what he teaches his students: to always look at the primary source before examining how the meaning of events has changed over time. Writings both professionally and on the blog often have to do with black Americans both slave, free and military, with focal emphasis on the US Colored Troops experience at the Battle of the Crater in Petersburg.

 

Civil War Navy Civil War Navy, et al.,
Andrew Duppstadt is, by day, the Assistant Curator of Education for the North Carolina Division of State Historic Sites. After hours and on weekends he changes into his secret (well, okay, not very secret) identity as a seagoing man of an earlier time, ranging from the colonial/Revolutionary War period to that of the Late Unpleasantness. Good discussion of earlier period firearms is to be found here as well.

 

Civil Warriors CivilWarriors.net
This group blog is the joint project of Sean B. Dail, Mark Grimsley, Ethan S. Rafuse, Brooks D. Simpson, and Steven E. Woodworth, making it by far the most "academically" oriented heavyweight on the blog scene. They could easily overcome any disputatious commenter by dropping one copy of each book all of them have written onto the pest's head, squishing it at once. Wide range of topics here from the sorts of professors you wish you could

 

Civil War Women Civil War Women
Maggie, or "Maggiemac" as she calls herself for blogging purposes, covers a wide range of women from the Civil War era. While nurses and abolitionists and vocal advocates of women's rights are somewhat overrepresented since they were more likely to have written or been written about, all levels of society can be found mentioned here. Women of both north and south, black, white, Native American and mixed race, of high and low social station are all to be found heMaggie can find any details on them at all.

 

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