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Inventions and such that resulted from the Civil War - General Civil War Talk - Civil War Talk - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
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 Posted: Thu Apr 17th, 2008 11:05 pm
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renee
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I was wondering if anyone has made a list of inventions (specific types of weapons,  paper money, etc.) as well as other things (like female nurses), that were created as a direct result of the war? If not, do you think we could make a list? I would be most interested in the things that are still be used today!

Thanks,  

Renee



 Posted: Thu Apr 17th, 2008 11:19 pm
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susansweet
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Renee, I have written two flyers for the Drum Barracks on things that happened first during the Civil War .  One is Civil War First Civilians and the other is Civil War First Medicine .   I am working on a third one for Military which may end up divided into a couple of flyers when I get it done. 

There is a good book called Civil War First that has many interesting facts in it . 

Susan



 Posted: Thu Apr 17th, 2008 11:30 pm
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Texas Defender
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renee-

  There are hundreds of things that could be included on a list of innovations due to the Civil War. Here is a small sample.

1st_page

  However, no list would include: "paper money." In America, paper money was issued during the Revolutionary War. Ever hear the term: "Not worth a Continental?"

 

Continental (currency) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  Your list also would not include: "female nurses," if those in other places were observed. Female nurses were used in some numbers by both sides in the Crimean War. Ever hear of Florence Nightingale?

Crimean War Overview



 Posted: Thu Apr 17th, 2008 11:46 pm
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renee
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Thank you, Susan, will have to look for that book and add to the growing stack.

TX Defender, the list on the link you provided is exactly what I wanted, thanks!
I thought I heard that at the beginning of the CW, that the nurses were primarily male and that they started using women as the war progressed? Yes, i've heard of Florence Nightingale.



 Posted: Sun Apr 20th, 2008 06:49 am
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cklarson
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Folks,

RE: inventions. Please see my webage "Springing to the Call" at nymas.org -- right sidebar, scroll down, the chapters from Martha Coston's memoir.

Surprisingly, per Google Analytics, Coston gets a fair number of queries. She is on a few women inventors' webpages, including MIT's I think.

Anyway, Coston was the widow of Benjamin F. Coston, a budding naval scientist, who probably died young from experimenting with gas lighting for the city of Boston. While with the navy, he had developed a prototype for a new signaling system, plus a code book.

Left a penniless widow with 2 small children at age 21, Coston pursued her husband's invention, but had to start over with the 3 color flare wand signal device. She kept his code book that gave the Navy, basically, Morse Code capability, by alpha/numeric ciphers and phrased orders. Coston conducted experiments herself and finally found an NYC pyrotechnic firm that could produce her flares. They went into a partnership for manufactuing the signals and ca. 16 million were sold to the US Navy during the war.

The Coston Night Signal was the main night signaling device used by both the Navy and the US Coast Guard, especially its predecessor, the Life Saving Service, well into the 1930s, prior to the full advent of marine radios. It's formula is stlil the generic one used for highway flares today.

On my page, I reprint the full chapters from Coston's memoir, _A Signal Success_ that deal with the development of the signal and its use during the war. Particularly see the letter by ADM D. D. Porter at the end.

It's really unbelievable that this signaling system was extremely important to naval operations, yet I have never found a mention of it in any CW work.

In the similar way, sultry actress Heddy Lamar and partner developed radio frequency hopping in 1942.

CKL



 Posted: Sun Apr 20th, 2008 11:02 pm
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CleburneFan
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One of the links above mentions that the Civil War produced the first aircraft carrier! Can anyone tell me more about that? 

The only Civil War aircraft I know of is the observation balloon.  Did they mean that whatever was used to carry the balloon was an "aircraft carrier" or was there actually a naval vessel that carried some contraption which could be called an aircraft by mid-nineteenth standards?

 



 Posted: Sun Apr 20th, 2008 11:40 pm
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PvtClewell
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Fan,

Check this out:
http://members.aol.com/gordonkwok/torpedoes.html

It should answer some of your questions, especially the last two-sentence paragraph in the top section.

Last edited on Sun Apr 20th, 2008 11:41 pm by PvtClewell



 Posted: Sun Apr 20th, 2008 11:51 pm
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CleburneFan
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Thank you Private! That is exactly what I was looking for. So it was a naval vessel carrying an observation balloon. Well. We live and learn. Great web site you linked, by the way.



 Posted: Mon Apr 21st, 2008 04:44 am
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susansweet
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Fan I have a friend that does Lowe for reenactments.  No balloon but a great display of all the things related to Lowe .  Thaddeus came to California after the War and settled in Pasadena.  He installed an observatory on Mt. Lowe above Pasadena.  Gone now.

His balloon was the first armored aircraft . They put metal sheet on bottom of basket to keep from being injured by ground fire.

First air to ground telegraph systerm

First air mapping

first air spying

Custer first general to go up in Lowe's balloon.  He did crouch below in the basket but SAID he loved it and did go up again

and first aircraft carrier , the ballon was landed on the ship . 

Check out website from his great grandchildren who still live in the area.  http://www.thaddeuslowe.name/   

One belongs to our Round Table as do the two people who reenact the Lowes.

Susan



 Posted: Mon Apr 21st, 2008 09:01 am
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CleburneFan
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Funny, Susan. Thaddeus Lowe was a question I once submitted to Javal for the Trivia. I can't remember if he accepted it or not. I thought he was such an interesting character.

I have a couple  big files of questions for Trivia, but, alas, no longer participate.



 Posted: Mon Apr 21st, 2008 11:47 am
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PvtClewell
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Susan,

A friendly nit to pick:

Custer first general to go up in Lowe's balloon. He did crouch below in the basket but SAID he loved it and did go up again

As far as I can tell, Custer was made a general by Alfred Pleasonton in June 1863, just prior to the Gettysburg campaign. He was promoted from lieutenant to brigadier general at the age of 23. Meanwhile, as far as I know, Lowe's balloons were discontinued by the AofP after Chancellorsville in early May of 1863.

What I found was that McClellan ordered Custer in a balloon during the Peninsula campaign, when Custer was a lieutenant fresh out of West Point.

My wife hates it when I pick nits. I could also totally have misunderstood the time frame here. Was it possible that Custer could have ascended in a balloon after Gettysburg in some kind of exhibition flight? Or maybe he was the first person who later became a general to go up in a balloon. I misunderstand a lot of things. Maybe it's my short attention span. My wife says I ramble on a lot, too... :shock:



 Posted: Mon Apr 21st, 2008 01:43 pm
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susansweet
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Pvt.  You are right .  I misstated the comment.  Custer did go up during the  Peninsula Campaign .  He was not a general at the time.  Lowe was helping out at Seven Pines.  I guess I should have said future General. 

I can be a nit picker too.  So no offense taken.  Thanks for setting the record on Professor Lowe and Custer straight. 

My friends when they present the Lowe story tell this tale.  I also just read about it in more detail in Last in their Class Custer,  Pickett and the Goats of West Point.  Which is a very good book by the way.

Susan



 Posted: Mon Apr 21st, 2008 01:44 pm
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susansweet
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Fan I still do trivia , addicted to it. 



 Posted: Tue Apr 22nd, 2008 08:42 pm
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renee
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I don't know enough yet to participate in trivia, but enjoy reading it.



You have chosen to ignore Bama46. click Here to view this post


 Posted: Tue Apr 22nd, 2008 11:20 pm
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CleburneFan
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What turned out weird for me in Trivia was eventually I discovered I enjoyed doing research to come up with questions to submit much more than I enjoyed researching answers for the questions of others.

Trivia is very time consuming as Bama46 has said. I finally decided the time could be better spent for me in directed reading on campaigns, cavalry operations or a particular general, etc.

But folks who possess a vast general knowledge of the Civil War really do enjoy the Trivia and are challenged by it. Maybe some day I'll go back and try again.



 Posted: Mon Apr 28th, 2008 09:36 pm
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Widow
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During the Peninsula campaign, Gen. Fitz John Porter made several balloon ascents with Lowe or assistant as pilot.  One day Porter got in the "car" before the pilot did, and the rope broke.  Up up and aw-a-a-a-y.  People yelled instructions from the ground, and he was drifting near enemy lines.  Of course the enemy didn't know it was Porter, or that he was alone.  Eventually the balloon moved back to Union territory and he made a safe landing.

Custer the thrill-seeker never had one like that!

Patty



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