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 Posted: Fri Jun 6th, 2008 10:28 pm
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williamr
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Attention Treasure Hunters:

National Treasure Hidden Secrets Of Fort McPherson's Unsolved Mysteries. Fact or Fiction?




In the early history of Fort McPherson our nation and leaders were trying to establish a purpose and a vision for Georgia's future. Looking back to the past, questions are raised. What was our purpose to be here? Was it to protect lands and resources like the Yellowstone project, or something deeper?

In October 1881, Secretary of War Robert T. Lincoln ended the lease and ordered that the land be returned to the owners and buildings be auctioned. According to his orders McPherson Barracks was abandoned on 8 December 1881. The auctioned buildings yielded $17,264.40.

The barracks were officially closed, but each summer Army troops still encamped there to escaped the heat of subtropical Florida on the same ground. After four years of borrowed use, Congress revisited the need for the barracks in the Atlanta area.

On 3 March 1885, Congress passed the Sundry Civil Bill allocating $15,000 for the initial purchase of land sufficient for a 10-company post.

Here are the mysteries:

Five tracts of land amounting to 14,009 acres were purchased in September 1885.
Where did this money come from? According to a newspaper story written in the Atlanta Newspapers on March 7th, 1885 the Sundry bill was struck down stating

"The item in the sundry civil bill appropriating fifteen thousand dollars for the purchase of a site near Atlanta of a ten-company post, was stricken out by the senate committee on appropriations, and an item substituted appropriating $165,000 for military posts in general in the discretion of the secretary of war"

So we must ask, according to the story were both items struck down, if $165,000 was approved the Army, was that for use of all States? We know that the original buildings sold for $17,000 back to the public. So we know that $15,000 would only cover the cost of new buildings, where did the money come from to purchase the land? It was only a lease in the beginning.

like Yellowstone the Army was placed in charge to protect lands that were of national importance. They were able to lease land in Yellowstone for the mission.

Was that the original mission for the lands in Georgia? The clues may be hidden in the city names now known as East Point, Forrest Park, Collage Park.


Captain Joshua W. Jacobs, assistant quarter- master, was totally responsible for developing and implementing plans for the post. In August 1886, Congress authorized the purchase of an adjoining 96.31 acres.

The original boundaries of the new post contained just over 26 acres of land.Today 500 acres seems to be the total.



Digging up the past may result in some unknown facts concerning how Fort McPherson came into being, and may even shed some light on to the real purpose of the Army being there.



Rumors started by old timers told of stories that there was a large treasure trove of gold brought there by Union troops from the west coast. Nebraska territory Army troops were said to have hidden ancient Indian gold in Army cannons to be transported to the east coast to a location called East Point in Georgia around 1887, to be placed under protection of the Atlanta Barracks Army Station, then was moved a few years later in secret to a location known as West Point somewhere in the southern states. Imagine such nonsense! Golden cannons painted black by the thousands, but that's just probably just a tall tale southerners told to pass the time in the summer.



At the least, it may be that original mission may have been protect a great national land resource, or it could have been as strange as to protect treasure of western gold, only time will tell. We only hope that Fort McPherson's lands will remain in the public trust until such time the mystery is solved, It is a national treasure owned by the people for the people.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here is the link to the newspaper story that contradicts the information on the Sundry Bill credit for the purchase of Fort McPherson.
dated March 7, 1885
Source: Acj Stacks , Archive History: Atlanta Constitution Story title: A permanent Military Post


http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/ajc_historic/access/526218762.html?dids=526218762:526218762&FMT=ABS&FMTS=ABS:AI&date=Mar+7,+1885&author=&pub=The+Atlanta+Constitution+(1881-2001)&edition=&startpage=4&desc=A+PERMANENT+MILITARY+POST



Here is something to add to the mystery, General McPherson was placed on the 1891 $2 bill which later had on the reverse side of the modern $2 version the signing of the Constitution. It seems strange that a non president was given that honor for a paper bill. Might be of interest to find out why he was chosen for that honor.



He must have discovered "found money" on that west coast





Two Dollars in Coin, United States Treasury Note, Series of 1891 (Tillman/Morgan) Red Seal, Serial Number: B9333669,(Legal Tender Act of July 14, 1890). Major-General McPherson was the highest ranking Union soldier to give his life during the war between the states. Notes like this one are becoming increasingly hard to find.







http://cahillcompany.com/_wsn/page5.html

 

Information on cannons produced as copies of "West point NY copies" and a foundry that smelted metal in Georgia to produce or retire old cannons

Parrott Rifle. This iron cannon was rifled and fired an elongated shell made specifically for the gun. Designed before the war by Captain Robert Parker Parrott, this gun was longer than a Napoleon, sleeker in design, and distinguishable by a thick band of iron wrapped around the breech. The Parrott design went through several improvements during the war and was changed in 1863 to a larger 3-inch bore and matching Parrott shell. The 3-inch Parrott was standardized the following year and most 2.9-inch guns were withdrawn from service. Parrott Rifles were manufactured by the West Point Arsenal in Cold Spring, New York and also made in 20 and 32-pounder sizes. The 10-pounder Parrotts used during the Gettysburg Campaign had an effective range of over 2,000 yards. The 5th New York Battery was composed of six 20-pounder Parrotts.
Confederate copies of the Parrott Rifle were produced by the Noble Brothers Foundry and the Macon Arsenal in Georgia. Parrott Rifles in 10 and 20-pounder sizes were sprinkled throughout some southern batteries

Maps of West Point Bullion Depository established in 1937 near Fort Knox

http://www.eyeball-series.org/usbd-eyeball.htm

Attachment: cannons.jpg (Downloaded 35 times)

Last edited on Sat Jun 7th, 2008 12:32 am by williamr



 Posted: Sat Jun 7th, 2008 12:22 am
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williamr
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example of McPherson $2 bill

Attachment: Mcphersononmoney.jpg (Downloaded 35 times)



 Posted: Sat Jun 7th, 2008 06:33 am
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williamr
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The Golden Spike and tall tales of railroad Hobos

The Wabash Cannonball is a descendent of freights and passenger trains of the same name in the 1800s. Time table in the company's files showed it visited Chicago, Kansas City, St. Louis, and Omaha among other cities.
 The Wabash Cannonball entered the American folk culture as a hobo ballad, whose lyrics have been rewritten and revised many, many times."
Most of the Wabash Cannonball's ancestry is lost to the past. Some veteran railroaders recall the Cannonball as a Chicago to Kansas City train. Others remember it running between St. Louis and Omaha

There are many theories of the origin of "The Wabash Cannonball". Utah Phillips states that hobos somewhere imagined a mythical train called the "Wabash Cannonball" and created the lyrics and music to go with the myth.

Another theory states that the song is based on a tall tale in which Cal S. Bunyan, Paul Bunyan's brother, constructed a railroad known as the Ireland, Jerusalem, Australian & Southern Michigan Line. After two months of service, the 700-car train was traveling so fast that it arrived at its destination an hour before its departure.

When the hobos learned of this train, they called her "The Wabash Cannonball" and said that every station in America had heard her whistle.

so many believed was the nation's Manifest Destiny, unity from the Atlantic to the Pacific shores. It also became increasingly clear to Congressional leaders, that in the event of a Civil War between the north and the south, which ever side had the best transportation system and access to the west, would hold a great military advantage.

The Central Pacific Railroad began constructing eastward from Sacramento, California, and the Union Pacific westward from Omaha, Nebraska. The majority of the track was built by Irish laborers from the East, Chinese who entered the country from the West, veterans of both the Union and Confederate armies, and Mormons who wished to see the railroad pass through Ogden and Salt Lake City. (The Mormon leader Brigham Young became a member of the Board of Directors of the Union Pacific). The men worked for an average of between one and three dollars a day. Between 1865 and 1869 the Union Pacific laid 1,086 miles and the Central Pacific 689 miles of track.

The years immediately following the construction of the transcontinental railroad were years of astounding growth for the United States. Between 1860 and 1890 the miles of railroad track interlacing the U.S. rose from 30,000 to 270,000, and the population leapt from 31,000,000 to over 76,000,000 people, many of whom were recent immigrants.

My folks came to the United States from Sweden in 1866; landed in New York, then came to Omaha. When they got to Omaha they had $5.00 in American money, no job, and couldn't speak a word of English…Then they both got work on the new Union Pacific railroad from Omaha to Laramie City. Father worked on the road and mother cooked and washed for twenty-two men, for nine months; when they got back to Omaha they had $900.00 saved up

here are lyrics as performed by The Carter Family in their 1929 recording:

Verse:

Out from the wide Pacific to the broad Atlantic shore
She climbs flowery mountain, o'r hills and by the shore
Although she's tall and handsome, and she's known quite well by all
She's a regular combination of the Wabash Cannonball.
Verse:

Oh the Eastern states are dandy, so the Western people say
Chicago, Rock Island, St. Louis by the way
To the lakes of Minnesota where the rippling waters fall
No chances to be taken on the Wabash Cannonball.
Chorus:

Oh, listen to the jingle, the rumor and the roar
As she glides along the woodland, o'r hills and by the shore
She climbs the flowery mountain, hear the merry hobos squall
She glides along the woodland, the Wabash Cannonball.
Verse:

Oh, here's old daddy Cleaton, let his name forever be
And long be remembered in the courts of Tennessee
For he is a good old rounder 'til the curtain 'round him fall
He'll be carried back to victory on the Wabash Cannonball.
Verse:

I have rode the I.C. Limited, also the Royal Blue
Across the Eastern countries on Elkhorn Number Two
I have rode these highball trains from coast to coast that's all
But I have found no equal on the Wabash Cannonball.
Chorus:

Oh, listen to the jingle, the rumor and the roar
As she glides along the woodland, o'r hills and by the shore
She climbs the flowery mountain, hear the merry hobos squall
She glides along the woodland, the Wabash Cannonball



 Posted: Sat Jun 7th, 2008 07:17 am
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williamr
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"DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
WASHINGTON, D. C., Jan. 24, 1866.

"SIR, – I have the honor to submit herewith enclosed, for your action, the report of the commissioners appointed by you on the 23d December, 1865, to examine the first section of forty miles of the Union Pacific Railroad, extending west from the city of Omaha, Territory of Nebraska. The, company authorized to build this road having, as shown in the report of the commissioners, obligated itself to remedy, within a reasonable time, the deficiencies in the construction of said section, I respectfully recommend that the same be accepted, and proper steps be ordered for the issue of the bonds and land-grants due the company agreeably to law.

"I am, sir, with much respect, your obedient servant,

"JAS. HARLAN, Secretary.

"THE PRESIDENT."


"EXECUTIVE MANSION, Jan. 24, 1866.

"The within recommendations of the Secretary of the Interior are approved, and the Secretary of the Treasury and himself are hereby directed to carry the same into effect.

"ANDREW JOHNSON."



 Posted: Sat Jun 7th, 2008 08:30 am
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williamr
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Was The Wabash a Real Train or a Metaphor of a legend?

The Wabash River
 is a 475 mi (765 km) long river in the eastern United States that flows southwest from northwest Ohio near St. Henry, Ohio across northern Indiana to Illinois where it forms the southern Illinois-Indiana border before draining into the Ohio River and connecting to the salt river located near West Point Kentucky.

The name "Wabash" is an English spelling of the French name for the river, "Ouabache." French traders named the river after the Miami Indian word for the river, waapaahšiiki, meaning "it shines white".

Was the " Wabash Cannon Ball" a real train or a supply route? Only the hobos know for sure.
 The water leaves and arives an hour earlier.



 Posted: Sat Jun 7th, 2008 04:55 pm
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Define: goldbrick, goldbricker
A term that may have been started by Brick Masons during the Civil War, it may have been used to make foundry workers appear lazy so questions about their secret work they were performing was not closely scrutinized. It is strange to consider that civil war soldiers may have shipped gold back east and created copies of gold bricks for our government.

Could our nation leaders have created fake gold bricks for public inspection, while keeping the location of the real bricks a closely held secret?

Reverand Duffield preached to his flock about laying up  treasures on earth and how pointless the effort if you lose your soul

His son  William Ward Duffield a Union officer, accepted the duty as an Army paymaster after the war . His service to General Sherman was a great honor.

 As the acquisition of knowledge depends more upon what a man remembers then upon the quantity of his readings, so the acquisition of property depends more on what is saved than upon what is earned.

The largest reservoir, though feed by abundant and living springs, will fail to supply their owners water if secret leaking-places are permitted to drain off their contents.

In like manner through by his skill and energy a man may convert his business into a flowing Pactolus, ever depositing its golden sands into his coffers, yet through the wants of unfrugal habits, he may live embarrassed and die poor.

_________ is the guardian of property, the good genius presence guides his footsteps.

Title: Golden Gems of life or Gathered Jewels for the Home Circle
Published Jan.1, 1880  reprinted in 1886  Central Publishing house

S.C. Ferguson , A.E. Allen

Last edited on Sat Jun 7th, 2008 05:03 pm by williamr



 Posted: Sat Jun 7th, 2008 09:04 pm
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williamr
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A Route through the tail of Dixie

A legend has it that a massive river that gave comfort to weary ship captains, did find passage for Union ships that travelled from the west coast carrying shipments that were of secret design during and post civil war.

The exact place found had a landing spot on a river known as  the Manatee, the coordinates below is an estimation of the landing spot. Followed by a cemetery Location that fits the description of of an area that fits the eulogy past down of a man known to some. Army troops found the area extremely hot during the summer months  and retreated north to find relief.
Unlike local people, that built houses that allowed for natural air flow to pass through and cool. Army troops built houses common in the extreme north. The area had members of  the Masonic Order but records of exact locations of early orders don't answer the modern day mystery.

27degrees 29'53.68" N  82degrees 33'08.62" W
27degrees 29'59.38" N 82degrees 32'56.31" W

Approximate location of a family Plot bearing the name gates
27degrees 29'41.02" N 82degrees 32'49.04" W


By cover of dark, under the watchful eye of the great architect of the universe our purpose fulfilled.
As we step upon the cobble stone to bid farewell to our beloved friend. We proclaim job done well
good servant. For you hold our secrets as did the seamstress that honors you with her thimble and needle
Our dear Friend and brother Mr. Gates. When anyone worthy of your time, ask where shall I find the Brick Master Gates.
We shall point you out to the east of our sight at the time you appoint

Last edited on Sat Jun 7th, 2008 09:06 pm by williamr



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