Civil War Interactive Discussion Board Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
Civil War Interactive Discussion Board > Civil War Talk > General Civil War Talk > Favorite strokes of brillance/sheer luck in the Civil War


Favorite strokes of brillance/sheer luck in the Civil War - General Civil War Talk - Civil War Talk - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
 Moderated by: javal1 Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  
 New Topic   Reply   Printer Friendly 
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Sun Sep 7th, 2008 01:30 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
1st Post
pamc153PA
Member
 

Joined: Sat Jun 14th, 2008
Location: Boyertown, Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 407
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Okay, not that I think we've totally finished off the missed opportunities/blunders (at least, I hope not, because I have a couple others to throw your way), but when I started that thread I intended it to be two-part. So let's give credit where it's due (or just acknowledge dumb luck):

What are your favorite examples of brillance and/or sheer dumb luck in the Civil War?

Have at it, folks--this has been way too much fun lately!

Pam



 Posted: Sun Sep 7th, 2008 02:06 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
2nd Post
fedreb
Member


Joined: Tue Jan 16th, 2007
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 239
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

As an example of brilliance how about Lt Col Joseph Bailey constructing the system of dams and chutes that allowed Admiral David Porter to get his ships to safety during the retreat down the Red River following Banks's ill fated Campaign in the Spring of '64



 Posted: Sun Sep 7th, 2008 02:42 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
3rd Post
Scout
Member
 

Joined: Thu Mar 13th, 2008
Location: Nashville
Posts: 45
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

luck. Rosecrans pulls out Wood's division minutes before Longstreet's Wing concentrates its attack on that very spot at Chickamauga.



 Posted: Sun Sep 7th, 2008 04:59 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
4th Post
Johan Steele
Life NRA,SUVCW # 48,Legion 352


Joined: Sat Dec 2nd, 2006
Location: South Of The North 40, Minnesota USA
Posts: 1065
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I've got to agree about Bailey. Engineering saving a fleet. Not something that happens all that often.



 Posted: Mon Sep 8th, 2008 12:07 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
5th Post
Crazy Delawares
Member


Joined: Fri Feb 22nd, 2008
Location: New Jersey USA
Posts: 143
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I was always amazed at how they could manuever those HUGE 17,000 lb. Dictators from the train to the platform behind revetments(sp?).



 Posted: Mon Sep 8th, 2008 01:24 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
6th Post
ole
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 22nd, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 2027
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I'm rather fond of noting how Lee woke up one morning and found Hooker and the AotP on his side of the river. Unfortunately, that's as far as he got, but for one shining moment, he did steal 2nd base.

ole



 Posted: Mon Sep 8th, 2008 02:04 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
7th Post
Scout
Member
 

Joined: Thu Mar 13th, 2008
Location: Nashville
Posts: 45
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

-What Josiah Gorgas was able to accomplish and invent to help keep the South armed and primed was astonishing.

-also, Patrick Cleburne's defense of Ringgold Gap.

-also, Bedford Forrest's evacuation of Nashville.

-also, Sherman's advance on Atlanta preceding Kennesaw.



 Posted: Mon Sep 8th, 2008 08:14 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
8th Post
susansweet
Member


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: California USA
Posts: 1420
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Farragut at Mobile Bay is a favorite of mine. Taking a chance and entering the Bay.
Susan



 Posted: Wed Sep 10th, 2008 01:52 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
9th Post
The Iron Duke
Member


Joined: Tue Jul 29th, 2008
Location: Georgia USA
Posts: 333
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I believe Grant's Vicksburg campaign is the most brilliant campaign of the war. His highly mobile army drove a wedge between the two Confederate armies and beat them in detail. He traps one army in Vicksburg and then detaches a force under Sherman to watch out for the second army coming from the rear. It's a combination of Napoleon and Caesar at Alesia.

There are so many instances that could be attributed to luck but one that sticks out in my mind is Meade's men at Fredericksburg somehow finding the one undefended part of Jackson's line.

Last edited on Wed Sep 10th, 2008 01:53 am by The Iron Duke



____________________
"Cleburne is here!" meant that all was well. -Daniel Harvey Hill


 Posted: Thu Sep 11th, 2008 05:20 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
10th Post
TimHoffman01
Member


Joined: Wed Nov 9th, 2005
Location: Mechanicsville, Virginia USA
Posts: 74
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Scout - Josiah Gorgas did do quite well in general, but, face it....he really BLEW it at the Battle of Hampton Roads.  He neglected to give the Virginia any solid shot, guess he just wasn't figuring on meeting a ship wearing three inches of iron armor.  Still goes under the Luck heading, in this case bad luck.

 

Personally, I like Magruder's little fakeout during the Penninsula campaign.  He made the Union intelligence gatherers, and thereby G.B.McClellan, think he had waaaay more troops than he did.  Kept the AoP from running right over him anyway.



 Posted: Thu Sep 11th, 2008 05:35 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
11th Post
martymtg
Member
 

Joined: Mon Aug 25th, 2008
Location:  
Posts: 38
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Wasn't luck, but you've got to be impressed with what Buford did the first day of Gettysburg. Spotting the Reb army, deciding quickly where to fight and dismounting his 2,500 cavalry and holding off the AoNV long enough for Reynolds to arrive.

More obviously, Stonewall Jackson's maneuvers thru the mountain passes to strike much larger union forces then melt back into the hills like a ghost. When we drove along Skyline Drive and looked out into the Shenandoah in the distance, and saw the passes that he moved his 17,000 men in and around the mountains, we were struck by the brilliance and the magnitude of these feats. Just THINKING about walking thru one of those passes is enough to make you tired.



 Posted: Sat Sep 27th, 2008 04:57 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
12th Post
shooter13
Member


Joined: Mon Jul 30th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 11
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Buford and Jackson--darned good picks.

Luck--the Monitor showing up as the Virginia was just beginning operations. Think what could have occured if the Virginia continued unnopposed.



 Posted: Sat Sep 27th, 2008 10:06 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
13th Post
gettysburgerrn
Member


Joined: Thu Mar 8th, 2007
Location: Masapequa, Ny, USA
Posts: 130
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Luck - for the federal second corps at the Bloody Angle at Spottslvania - that the confederates had pulled some 22 artillery pieces from the area. Ultimately it turned what could have been a bloody repulse into a murderous infantry fight..

ken



 Posted: Tue Sep 30th, 2008 02:34 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
14th Post
Mr Hess53
Member


Joined: Mon Sep 15th, 2008
Location: East Haven, Connecticut USA
Posts: 55
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

The federal soldiers finding Lee's orders wrapped around cigars before Antietam



 Posted: Tue Sep 30th, 2008 11:05 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
15th Post
gettysburgerrn
Member


Joined: Thu Mar 8th, 2007
Location: Masapequa, Ny, USA
Posts: 130
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Luck was also Early's arrival at precisely the right time in precisely the right place to drive back the federal 11th corps on day 1 at Gettysburg.\ken



 Posted: Tue Sep 30th, 2008 06:57 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
16th Post
Tom Wiehle
Member
 

Joined: Mon Jun 9th, 2008
Location:  
Posts: 22
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

How about the shell from the hundred pounder fired by the Alabama into the sternpost of the Kersarge. Had it exploded it would have been another victory for Semmes.
I saw that shell and part of the sternpost that was cut out, it is in the museum at the Washington Navy Yard.



 Posted: Tue Sep 30th, 2008 11:02 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
17th Post
ole
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 22nd, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 2027
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

How about that there was a Grant when LIncoln needed one?



 Posted: Wed Oct 1st, 2008 11:56 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
18th Post
barrydancer
Member


Joined: Wed Apr 23rd, 2008
Location: Norwalk, Connecticut USA
Posts: 135
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

TimHoffman: If I remember right, Virginia HAD solid shot at Hampton Roads, but she used most of it as heated shot, trying to cause fires aboard the wooden ships, leaving little for her fight with Monitor. Conversely, Monitor had plenty of solid shot, but was under orders not to fire her guns with a full charge of powder. Effectively, each ship was handicapped in a number of ways which kept one from defeating the other. At least that's part of what I took away from James Nelson's Reign of Iron. I should read that again. :)

Last edited on Wed Oct 1st, 2008 11:57 am by barrydancer



 Posted: Wed Oct 1st, 2008 07:32 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
19th Post
Widow
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 19th, 2006
Location: Oakton, Fairfax County, VA
Posts: 321
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

The second part of luck is making the right decision - knowing what to do.  The soldiers who found Specil Order 191 did the right thing by reporting it.  Eventually it got to McClellan's HQS, somebody recognized the signature and verified it was real, and Little Mac acted quickly.

On the other hand, the Federals at Pittsburg Landing who reported hearing Confederates moving through the woods, well, Sherman ignored the reports.  Chewed out the colonel.  Wrong decision.

Patty



 Posted: Wed Oct 1st, 2008 07:45 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
20th Post
Old Blu
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 16th, 2008
Location: Waynesboro., Virginia USA
Posts: 330
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Widow wrote: The second part of luck is making the right decision - knowing what to do.  The soldiers who found Specil Order 191 did the right thing by reporting it.  Eventually it got to McClellan's HQS, somebody recognized the signature and verified it was real, and Little Mac acted quickly.

On the other hand, the Federals at Pittsburg Landing who reported hearing Confederates moving through the woods, well, Sherman ignored the reports.  Chewed out the colonel.  Wrong decision.

Patty

Might as well used those lost orders for toilet paper no more good it did McClellan.
Luck.  McClellan didn't destroy the Army of The Confederacy!



 Current time is 05:07 amPage:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  
Civil War Interactive Discussion Board > Civil War Talk > General Civil War Talk > Favorite strokes of brillance/sheer luck in the Civil War
Top




UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.4258 seconds (8% database + 92% PHP). 26 queries executed.