Civil War Interactive Discussion Board Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register


Cadet Rank in the Civil War - General Civil War Talk - Civil War Talk - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
 Moderated by: javal1
 New Topic   Reply   Printer Friendly 
 Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Wed Aug 10th, 2011 06:46 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
1st Post
rebelnc1987
Transplanted Tar Heel


Joined: Fri Jul 29th, 2011
Location: Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 9
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Hello all,

I have run across a rank I know nothing about and can't seem to find any answers. This question applies to both Civil War and Revolutionary War. I came across a rank called "cadet" which I am unfamiliar with. All indications are that these "cadets" were not members of a local military academy, but gained this rank upon enlistment or promotion. Does anyone have any idea what this rank is and what its function was?

M Hinson



 Posted: Wed Aug 10th, 2011 09:54 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
2nd Post
Mark
Member
 

Joined: Mon Mar 30th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 434
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

During the early national period, the US Army adopted the European practice of allowing some cadets into the officer corps. The rank of cadet was basically unofficial military apprenticeship as a way to eventually obtain a military commission (which at that time were given in a way similar to a civil service appointment today). The rank became official in 1794 when the war department authorized two cadets per artillery and engineer company. As time went on, cadets began to receive organized instruction at the Engineer school at West Point which eventually became the US Military Academy. By 1830, virtually all regular army officers were appointed as cadets and attended West Point. Looking in the 1865 Customs of Service for Non-commisioned officers, I found a section that discusses the classwork, duties and requirements of a cadet, however, as far as I know, after the early national period, cadets had to complete their West Point instruction before receiving commissions and reporting to their units as Lieutenants (or "ensigns" before 1820). Hope that helps some. What sources are you finding those references in?

Mark



 Posted: Wed Aug 10th, 2011 11:05 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
3rd Post
Hellcat
Root Beer Lover


Joined: Tue Nov 15th, 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 889
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Mark wrote: During the early national period, the US Army adopted the European practice of allowing some cadets into the officer corps. The rank of cadet was basically unofficial military apprenticeship as a way to eventually obtain a military commission (which at that time were given in a way similar to a civil service appointment today). The rank became official in 1794 when the war department authorized two cadets per artillery and engineer company. As time went on, cadets began to receive organized instruction at the Engineer school at West Point which eventually became the US Military Academy. By 1830, virtually all regular army officers were appointed as cadets and attended West Point. Looking in the 1865 Customs of Service for Non-commisioned officers, I found a section that discusses the classwork, duties and requirements of a cadet, however, as far as I know, after the early national period, cadets had to complete their West Point instruction before receiving commissions and reporting to their units as Lieutenants (or "ensigns" before 1820). Hope that helps some. What sources are you finding those references in?

Mark

That the same section that discusses the courses per year, Mark? If so, I gotta say I loved that section when I came across it. Just the idea of telling the NCOs what courses they'd be taking and in what year they'd take them when at West Point.



 Posted: Thu Aug 11th, 2011 02:39 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
4th Post
Mark
Member
 

Joined: Mon Mar 30th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 434
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Hellcat, yes, I was looking at that section, but I don't think NCOs promoted to LT had to go to West Point. If you look at paragraph 569 in the same manual, it talks about a board of officers that would examine NCOs recommended for promotion to officer rank. If they passed the board, they received promotion to the rank of brevet LT. I think the reason that the USMA curriculum was in the NCO manuel was because a cadet did not have a commission yet and thus would have to be considered a non-comissioned officer. Cheers!

Mark



 Posted: Thu Aug 11th, 2011 07:56 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
5th Post
Hellcat
Root Beer Lover


Joined: Tue Nov 15th, 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 889
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I'm not entirely sure, Mark. I think I'm being confused by a quoted sub-paragraph within 569.


 

"77. A board, to consist of the Professors of Mathematics and Ethics and the Commandant of Cadets, will convene at the Military Academy, on the first Monday of September in every year, for the examination of such non-commissioned officers, for promotion as have already passed the regimental examination prescribed in General Orders No. 17, of October 4, 1854."


 

The note at the end of the Cadet section doesn't help me any as it sounds like the vacancies for West Point from the states making up the Confederacy are then given to the enlisted ranks in the occupying armies.

However, paragraph 301 does give the NCOs from highest to lowest and Cadet and Medical CXadet are listed as ranking above Sergeant Major



 Current time is 04:30 am
Top




UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.3168 seconds (12% database + 88% PHP). 26 queries executed.