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 Posted: Thu Feb 23rd, 2012 01:12 pm
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HankC
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The flooding river did most of the work at Fort Henry.

Realizing he was outnumbered 5-1, Tilgman left his gunners at the fort and moved the infantry to Fort Donelson.

not sure what you mean about 'Grant arrived 3 days later', the fort surrendered to Foote in the morning and the infantry, with Grant, arrived in the afternoon...



 Posted: Thu Feb 23rd, 2012 01:33 pm
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Mark
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Hank, don't you think that understanding both tactics and strategy along with social, cultural and political aspects of the war give us a more complete picture? I think the rise of cultural history is a good thing. I'm not sure if you were saying that or not, it's just the tone I got from your post. What I think has not been done to the extent it ought to be is histories linking social and military history. That is what I am working on in my dissertation.

Mark



 Posted: Thu Feb 23rd, 2012 06:29 pm
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HankC
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i agree, the rise of non-military civil war period history is very good.
 
another poster mentioned the apparent dearth of new publications.
 
my take is that there are many relevant new books, just not as many on the period's military aspects.
 
the field now views reconstruction as part of the civil war.
 
this broadens our understanding of cause and effect and that hostilities were not necessarily only between armies and only for four years...



 Posted: Fri Feb 24th, 2012 12:01 am
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Hellcat
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But here's my question, what good is a focus on social, cultural and political aspects of the war if there is no attention paid to the war? With it being the 150th anniversary of the war this would be the perfect time really to bring up to social, cultural, and political aspects of the war for the average person, but again beyond Fort Sumter I haven't seen any mention of the war in national media. Considering where I am I very seriously doubt I'll see any mention in local media unless there was some big named local hero who died.



 Posted: Sat Feb 25th, 2012 05:57 am
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cklarson
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Unlike others, I read through every army and navy memo regarding the Mississippi expedition/TN from Nov. through the fall of Donelson. Buell's plan to have a 3 pronged movemnt into TN with his forces was in place until Jan. 26, when Grant returned to Cairo (or Paducah, can't exactly remember) after going off on a demo to support Buell's movement that never occurred, quel suprise. Halleck had ordered that move. So as of the 26th, there was no approved plan. Foote had already told Halleck that the mortar boats could not be used on the TN River, so that was no delay factor. Lincoln ordered Halleck to conduct a re con of the TN R. Halleck advised Foote ca. Jan. 26, he was awaiting C. F. Smith's report before advancing on the Tenn. But intelligence received on the 30th that Beauregard was reinforcing Johnston, set everything in motion in a flurry of telegrams. Thus Foote moved a week earlier than planned. Halleck had written McClellan on Jan. 20 that the true line of invasion was the Tenn. R., but there's no evidence that McClellan ever told Lincoln that. Nor did Halleck to AL. So Anna Ella Carroll was the  only one who placed a plan for the Tenn. R. movement in front of Lincoln, which was why Stanton was appointed and dispatched Scott west to organize reinforcements.  The two top planners were Halleck and Foote because they were the senior officers. But don't mistake me, I'm a big fan of Grant. But the sole credit he gets for this is just wrong, wrong, wrong. It's also just silliness to believe that Lincoln would not somehow be overseeing this, as this was his home region. Foote was sending him daily reports on the progress of the gun and mortar boats, per his instructions.

But, of course, no one wants to listen to two "uppity" women, that is, Carroll and me. She's been accused of lying before Congress, suborning perjury from Scott and Wade, forging testimony. And all four military committees hearing her claim for monies owed by the govt. for publications voted in her favor. There is no dispute about her role.

Kay Larson



 Posted: Sat Feb 25th, 2012 01:20 pm
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Old Blu
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She was a busy lady.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Ella_Carroll



 Posted: Mon Feb 27th, 2012 08:38 pm
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HankC
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here's an article that may help: http://journalofthecivilwarera.com/forum-the-future-of-civil-war-era-studies/the-future-of-civil-war-era-studies-military-history/

 

it may be that attention is thrown on areas of military history that have current appeal, not necessarily to the public, but to the public's leaders.

 

another Gettysburg study may appeal to the buff, but a study on insurgency in occupied territory is more useful to today's defense department...



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