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 Posted: Fri Nov 17th, 2006 03:38 pm
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Fuller
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I had such a great response to my post of "What's your favorite Civil War songs?" that I decided to continue with "What's your favorite Civil War photos?"

I have many but I am consolidating down to 2.

#1  Grant with Meade and officers at a war council May 1, 1864

Grant considered his options of fighting another Peninsula camp., pushing through the Wilderness or moving towards Gordansville.  While famously smoking one of his cigars he commented to a prying repoter about how long it would take his army to move into Richmond, "I will agree to be there in about four days.  That is, if Gen. Lee becomes a party to the agreement.  But if he objects, the trip will undoubtedly be prolonged."

In the photo Grant can be seen leaning over a church pew to discuss plans on a map held by Meade.  The photo shows the men in a more relaxed state.  Some smoking, others reading papers.  Hardly any notice the camera is there.  I would love to know exactly what was said in that conversation.

#2 Custer posing with conf. prisoner.

The two are sitting on a box together.  Custer looks very relaxed and quite sure of himself.  The two men were actually buds while attending West Point together.  If there is a movie to be made about Custer, I think Matthew McConaughey would do a fine job.

We all have no doubt spent hours flipping through books by McPherson and others.  So I am curious to know some of your favorite photos and why.

Fuller



 Posted: Fri Nov 17th, 2006 04:36 pm
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ole
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I'll advance two, as well.

#1 - The burned district of Columbia, SC.

#2 - Sherman on his horse at Atlanta.

Ole



 Posted: Fri Nov 17th, 2006 05:49 pm
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calcav
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#1 U.S. Grant. The pic was taken at a Washington studio and it is a full figure shot of him with light coming down through a skylight. Behind him you can see the frame that held the subjects head steady while the portrait was being taken. This was an informal photo taken during a session for an actual portrait. During the session the skylight broke and the glass showered down around him but he never flinched. The photographer, a Brady assistant, was badly scared and amazed that the general was not only still alive but completely without a scratch.

#2 Confederate soldiers at Fredericksburg. The photo was taken from the east bank (Union side) of the Rappahannock from the ruins of the railroad bridge. Several of the soldiers are actually posing .

#3 General John Buford and staff. Look at the shine on that mans boots!

Tom



 Posted: Sat Nov 18th, 2006 06:11 pm
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Widow
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My favorite is the one of Grant, leaning his forearm against a tree.  It's casual and informal, so you see the man as others saw him day to day.  There's thoughtful expression on his face, as if he's considering his plans for the next campaign.  Patty



 Posted: Sun Nov 19th, 2006 04:49 pm
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Regina
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The photo of Grant that Widow mentions is one of my favorites and so is the photo of Lincoln in a Federal camp speaking to McClellan and about a dozen other soldiers.  I don't know where it was taken, but I love the way in which Lincoln stands out in it.                Also, Fuller, calcav and ole---where would I be able to see the photos you have mentioned?



 Posted: Sun Nov 19th, 2006 06:27 pm
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Widow
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Regina,

Yes, it's a terrific shot.  That picture of Lincoln and Little Mac was taken at Antietam, a few days after the battle on 17 Sep 62.  I believe the photographer was Mathew Brady, or possibly his assistant Alexander Gardner.  The president and the general are partially facing each other in the tent.

Notice the tent pole which appears to be between them.  Of course the tent pole was already in place, it wasn't the photographer's prop.  But the photographer took advantage of the visual effect of the "divider" and asked them to pose that way.  They probably didn't even notice the tent pole, it's one of those commonplace things like a doorknob.  The photographer intended to illustrate the rift between the Commander in Chief and the Commanding General.

What was Little Mac thinking while posing?  We can guess what Old Abe was thinking.  In just two months, McClellan was out and Burnside was in.

There's another shot taken with the two standing in front of the tent, Lincoln in his top hat, McClellan staring at his vest buttons.  Mac was of average height, actually, but he was so young that the soldiers called him "Little."

Patty



 Posted: Sun Nov 19th, 2006 10:29 pm
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javal1
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I guess favorite doesn't always mean happiest. For me, the supposed last photo ever taken of Lincoln remains my favorite. The wear and tear on his face represent a microcosm of what I think the war did to the entire country - north and south.


 




 Posted: Mon Nov 20th, 2006 01:38 am
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ole
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Regina:

Sherman and the Burning of Columbia, Marion Brunson Lucas; Sherman's Civil War; Selected correspondence .... ,Simpson and Berlin, Editors. The pictures appear in several other books (they are quite common) but these were the two I was able to miraculously lay my hands on.

Ole



 Posted: Mon Nov 20th, 2006 11:31 am
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Widow
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Joe, that Lincoln portrait was Alexander Gardner's work, after he left Mathew Brady and started his own studio.  He and Lincoln had good rapport, so Gardner was able to get Lincoln to relax and be himself.  Lincoln was the first president to understand the political power of a photograph, so was quite willing to work with Gardner.

Although most of the face is in shadow and slightly out of focus, the left eye is the only part which perfectly in focus, and reflects a little gleam of light.  Gardner didn't plan it that way, but he saw the possibility and captured it.  This image was one of Lincoln's favorites.

Gardner had been photographing Lincoln for two years, and in a way was documenting the rapid changes in the man's face. 

The crack is where the glass plate was broken accidentally after it was exposed.

Patty



 Posted: Mon Nov 20th, 2006 01:53 pm
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David White
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Last edited on Mon Nov 20th, 2006 06:07 pm by David White



 Posted: Mon Nov 20th, 2006 05:03 pm
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Fuller
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Last edited on Mon Nov 20th, 2006 06:41 pm by Fuller



 Posted: Mon Nov 20th, 2006 05:10 pm
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javal1
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Folks,

I would kindly ask that you size pictures to a maximum 350 pixel width before posting them. Posting huge photos eats up oodles of database space which costs us money. In addition, it makes folks scroll the entire topic from left to right, which many find annoying. Much appreciated.



 Posted: Mon Nov 20th, 2006 05:14 pm
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Fuller
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Last edited on Mon Nov 20th, 2006 06:41 pm by Fuller



 Posted: Tue Nov 21st, 2006 04:39 pm
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connyankee
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- The three Humiston kids

- Three Confederate prisoners (Gettysburg)

- Lee on his back porch in Richmond, shortly after the surrender

- Hancock (seated), Birney, Gibbon, and Barlow (Cold Harbor, 1864)

- Grant, Meade, and company at Massaponax Church, 1864

Too many to list, actually. 

- conn yankee

 

 

 



 Posted: Sat Nov 25th, 2006 07:34 am
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susansweet
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My most favorite picture is the three Confederate Prisoners at Gettysburg.  But I also love the picture of General Herman Haupt on his personal pontoon boat on the Potomac  I found it in the 365 Days Library of Congress book that came out this year. and the Powder Monkey . 

I was recently at a Civil War confrence one of the speakers Dennis Ringle the author of Mr. Lincoln's Navy said the Powder Monkey is his favorite picture.  He has it hanging on his wall in his office.



 Posted: Sat Nov 25th, 2006 08:47 pm
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Sarah Elizabeth
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My favorite photos are those taken at Massaponax Church, Virginia in May, 1864.  It's fascinating to be able to view so many of the Union commanders together. 

 Another favorite of mine has always been the Photo of Lincoln's first inauguration under the scaffolding of the unfinished Capitol dome.  To me, that picture symbolizes the task which Lincoln was faced with when he became President.  The Capitol was unfinished when he arrived in Washington, and even through those terrible years of conflict, work continued on the Capitol.  By the end of the conflict, the nation was reunited and Lincoln belonged "to the ages"... The Capitol remained, as it has through many dark days and proud moments of our history .

Sarah



 Posted: Tue Dec 5th, 2006 02:01 am
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CleburneFan
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There are so many wonderful photos from the Civil War and all those above have mentioned some of my favorites such as the three POWS after Gettysburg. I always wonder what eventually happened to them and what hardship awaited them after the photo was taken.

Another of my favorites is an 1865 (or late 1864) photograph of Brigadier General Emerson Opdycke with several of his regimental commanders at Nashville. The look on their faces reflects the traumatic experiences they have witnessed at Franklin  and Nashville, plus whatever other engagements and battles they have fought previously.

Their faces are gaunt and exhausted. They have haunted expressions.  No one smiles. I wonder if they know that the war is almost over, is almost won or do they worry that the horrors just witnessed in Tennessee will continue on and on? I don't see much sign hope in that photo, but I don't see surrender either...just the weight of tremendous, unthinkable responsibilty. What a photograph!

Last edited on Tue Dec 5th, 2006 04:04 pm by CleburneFan



 Posted: Tue Dec 5th, 2006 02:22 am
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susansweet
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Cleburne Fan where would I find that picture you are talking about.  I would love to study it . 

One of the interesting things about being so removed from the time period of the Civil War and having family on both sides of the War  I find it interesting to me that I admire both Opdyke and Cleburne and the bravery they both exhibited in the same battle.  Since they fought right opposite each other I would bet that Opdyke's troops are the ones that killed Cleburne but I still admire the bravery . 

Does that make sense to anyone ? 



 Posted: Tue Dec 5th, 2006 04:02 pm
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CleburneFan
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Your sentiments absolutely do make sense to me. I have a deep interest in both sides of the Civil War because I grew up near the Gettysburg Battlefield and have a great atachment to it. But I also lived in the Nashville area several years and Florida many years, so I have am also very interested in the Southern perspective.

There are military leaders on both sides that I find fascinating.  I also find that I most enjoy reading about the Western Theater of operations.  But it is all an amazing part of our history.


Whoops! I forgot to answer your question about where you can find the photograph I mentioned. I have seen it in a few places, but the one that is in front of me right now is in "The Confederacy's Last Hurrah:Spring Hill, Franklin and Nashville" by Wiley Sword. The page isn't numbered but the center of the book has a section of photographs of  both Union and Confederate officers,  some places where the battles raged and Nashville at that time.

The officers are each interesting. I just love the photo of Confederate Brigadier General Hiram Granbury who, like Cleburne, was killed at Franklin. If "they" make a movie of this battle Johnny Depp simply must play Granbury's role. 

Also a tragic figure is here too. Confederate General Thomas B SMith, who was hit on the head by a sword causing him such injury (brain damage?) that he spent the  next forty-seven years of his life incarcerated at the Tennessee Stae Hospital for the Insane!!  So very sad! 

Last edited on Tue Dec 5th, 2006 04:15 pm by CleburneFan



 Posted: Tue Dec 5th, 2006 05:40 pm
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Steven Cone
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Oh there are numerous 

A few would be the photos of Franklin, Tennessee taken  in 1884 that are in  "The Confederacy's Last Hurrah:Spring Hill, Franklin and Nashville" by Wiley Sword

Also  the picture of Old Harvey. the Bulldog mascot of co. F   Ohio Vol. Infantry.  Who was at franklin.

 



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