Civil War Interactive Discussion Board Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register


We Footloose Americans - General Civil War Talk - Civil War Talk - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
 Moderated by: javal1
 New Topic   Reply   Printer Friendly 
 Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Fri Apr 6th, 2007 01:54 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
1st Post
Widow
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 19th, 2006
Location: Oakton, Fairfax County, VA
Posts: 321
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

How many times have you read about a Civil War soldier, officer or enlisted, who was born in one state, then moved to another?

Lincoln: born in Kentucky, lived in Indiana, practiced law in Illinois.  Sherman: born in Ohio, settled in St. Louis.

So many others, I've forgotten their names.  Born in Georgia, was an insurance agent in St. Louis.

Yes, there were also many who had never been far from their homes until they started marching.  After the war, when they'd seen the world, they were changed men and may have had a hard time adjusting to the same-old same-old.  Sometimes they took up occupations based on the skills they'd learned during the war.  Such as blacksmith, farrier, wagon driver, telegrapher.  Executive management skills of large organizations like the transcontinental railroad.  Maybe intangible knowledge such as the courage to assess and take risks.  The importance of making good decisions based on accurate information.  The self-confidence that says, "Hey, I can do that, I've done things a lot harder."

It's always been our way to keep moving on, looking for change, for a chance at a better life.  Sometimes to escape the past.

Patty



 Posted: Fri Apr 6th, 2007 03:00 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
2nd Post
susansweet
Member


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: California USA
Posts: 1420
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Many of those soldiers both north and south came west after the war .  So many soldiers ended up in California.  Stoneman was governor of California for one term.  There were GAR chapters all over the state.  Near where UCLA and the National Cemetery are now was the Sawtell old soldiers home , on the other side  in I believe the Duarte area was the Dixie Old Soldiers home for Confederate Soldiers.  

On memorial day , both Confederate memorial day and the national holiday services are done by Sons and Daughters of Union and Confederate Vets.  I am a member of both daughters groups .  Confederate will attend a service at Hollywood Forever where there are Confederate vets  right along with Marilyn Monroe and Rudy Valentino.  On Memorial Day  Daughters of Union vets will take part in ceremonies at a Santa Ana cemetery were many are buried.  

The past two years I have attended ceremonies at a small Garden Grove cemetery where our Round Table Member Paul Gillette does a walking tour of the soldiers graves and tells about their lives and the battles they were in.  There is one onfederate at this cemetery too. 

 



 Posted: Fri Apr 6th, 2007 10:54 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
3rd Post
Widow
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 19th, 2006
Location: Oakton, Fairfax County, VA
Posts: 321
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Susan, again another fascinating post.  I guess they took Horace Greeley's advice and went west.  I don't think Greeley ever left New York, though.

There must be something about the other ocean.  :=))

The transcontinental railroad crossed Wyoming Territory, but surprisingly few people settled in Wyoming except along the railroad.  There was no gold, no farming, not much water, and a lot of alkaline soil.

Patty



 Posted: Sat Apr 7th, 2007 02:31 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
4th Post
susansweet
Member


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: California USA
Posts: 1420
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Thanks Patty,  the easterns came west in the 30's again with the Dust Bowl and again to work in the factories during WW2.   The town next to where my parents moved after we left the town of Compton in the late 60's was settled by the dust bowl migrant workers from Oklahoma and Texas, Bellflower  is it's name.  Most of the Central Valley from Bakersfield up to Visalia is full of second or third generation Okies.  Some even still farm.  

And by the way that Ocean is pretty great to watch.  I am sure the Vets loved it too when they had time. 



 Posted: Sat Apr 7th, 2007 07:42 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
5th Post
Widow
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 19th, 2006
Location: Oakton, Fairfax County, VA
Posts: 321
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Susan, my brother and I were born and raised in Laramie, our parents were both Nebraskans.  Now, my stepmom lives in Napa (Pacific), I'm in Oakton (Eastern), and brother Rick's two daughters are in San Antonio (Central) and Tucson (Mountain).  Rick lives in France, 6 hours later than Eastern.

Among my husband's 4 kids, 1 in Miami, 1 in Virginia Beach, and 2 here in Fairfax County.  At least we're all in the same time zone.

Rick's French neighbors just can't understand our desire to pick up and move on.  Some families have lived in the same house for CENTURIES!  Me, I was so anxious to start my new life after college, I didn't even hang around for the graduation ceremony, and got my diploma in the mail.

Itchy feet must be a fundamental part of our American character, since that's how most of our ancestors got here in the first place.  The huge exception is the Negro slaves.

Patty



 Posted: Sat Apr 7th, 2007 09:17 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
6th Post
susansweet
Member


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: California USA
Posts: 1420
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

The Morgan side of my father's family arrive 1636 in Roxbury Ma,  The Sweets soon after I think in New England somewhere  The Morgan's slowly moved west to Illinois and then Grandmother to Idaho  The Sweets went to Canada and then Michigan then my grandfather to Montana and Idaho to follow mining interest. He ran the mercantile stores. 

The  Davis side of my mother's family arrived in Penn. somewhere and before the Revolution had moved to South Carolina,  One of those Scots Irish  in York District.  William fought for the Patriots at Kings Mountain.  They moved west to Mississippi, on to Texas and Indian Territory my grandfather marrying my grandmother in Fort Smith and living in Oklahoma a new state at the time ,  Mama was born in Fort Smith .

Wilkersons came out of Tennessee but don't know when , they were in the Civil War I know , then on to Arkansas around the time of the Civil War .  Grandmother was born there. 

Mother and Daddy met in Los Angeles due to another war.  I haven't strayed far form home , just moving one county over, but brother has been up in Oregon and for the past 30 years is back tot he start in Boston area.   My niece is in Baltimore, my nephew  around the corner from my brother and sister in law. 

I have cousins across the country Arizona , Washington , Tennessee , Texas

I may not have moved far but I am happiest when I am in my van headed out to see what I can see .  Driven cross country twice since I retired seven years ago.  Drive north south in California at least to Oregon once or twice a year, Up to Washington and over to Montana once since retiring .  Have to go back as I missed Little Big Horn. 

I need a new car to get on the road any distance.  I have pretty much driven the one I have into the ground.   I am my father's daughter He loved to drive.  They did 6 cross countries after my parents both retired. 

We are footloose Americans.  Oh and I did four trips to Europe when I was a new teacher before the house and other expenses came along .

Susan



 Posted: Sat Apr 7th, 2007 09:17 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
7th Post
susansweet
Member


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: California USA
Posts: 1420
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

The Morgan side of my father's family arrive 1636 in Roxbury Ma,  The Sweets soon after I think in New England somewhere  The Morgan's slowly moved west to Illinois and then Grandmother to Idaho  The Sweets went to Canada and then Michigan then my grandfather to Montana and Idaho to follow mining interest. He ran the mercantile stores. 

The  Davis side of my mother's family arrived in Penn. somewhere and before the Revolution had moved to South Carolina,  One of those Scots Irish  in York District.  William fought for the Patriots at Kings Mountain.  They moved west to Mississippi, on to Texas and Indian Territory my grandfather marrying my grandmother in Fort Smith and living in Oklahoma a new state at the time ,  Mama was born in Fort Smith .

Wilkersons came out of Tennessee but don't know when , they were in the Civil War I know , then on to Arkansas around the time of the Civil War .  Grandmother was born there. 

Mother and Daddy met in Los Angeles due to another war.  I haven't strayed far form home , just moving one county over, but brother has been up in Oregon and for the past 30 years is back tot he start in Boston area.   My niece is in Baltimore, my nephew  around the corner from my brother and sister in law. 

I have cousins across the country Arizona , Washington , Tennessee , Texas

I may not have moved far but I am happiest when I am in my van headed out to see what I can see .  Driven cross country twice since I retired seven years ago.  Drive north south in California at least to Oregon once or twice a year, Up to Washington and over to Montana once since retiring .  Have to go back as I missed Little Big Horn. 

I need a new car to get on the road any distance.  I have pretty much driven the one I have into the ground.   I am my father's daughter He loved to drive.  They did 6 cross countries after my parents both retired. 

We are footloose Americans.  Oh and I did four trips to Europe when I was a new teacher before the house and other expenses came along .

Susan



 Posted: Sun Apr 8th, 2007 02:39 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
8th Post
Widow
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 19th, 2006
Location: Oakton, Fairfax County, VA
Posts: 321
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

My brother Rick and his wife live in a village in southwestern France, not one of the hot tourist spots, just pretty countryside and lots of vineyards.  Quite a few retired Brits live in the area too.  Rick and Bev are the only Yanks for miles.  Oops, kilometers.

Their British friends gasp at how BIG France is!  It takes a WHOLE DAY to drive from one side to the other.  Nobody in Britain lives more than 50 miles from the sea.

They stare blankly when Rick tells them that the closest sizable town to Laramie is 50 miles away, the state capital, Cheyenne.  That's just in the next county.

One Brit couple was planning a "holiday" in America, renting a car in Denver to drive to the Grand Canyon, then Las Vegas.  They were stunned when Rick explained that you can't get from Denver to the Grand Canyon in one day, or even two.  When they returned, they said, "You're right.  America is VAST!"  And they loved it.

All over the world, people admire Americans for what we have accomplished.  They don't necessarily admire the set of values we have which make those accomplishments possible.  In other words, they can gripe about how bossy we are, while buying our stuff.  Or selling their stuff to us.

This footloose American has lived at the same address for 24 years, quite a change from my gallivantin' ways.

Patty



 Current time is 02:25 am
Top




UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.3359 seconds (8% database + 92% PHP). 25 queries executed.