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 Posted: Tue May 8th, 2007 06:28 pm
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GenHood
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I will be visiting Charleston, SC next week.  Beyond the "big" stops like Forts Moultrie & Sumter, the Hunley, and Magnolia Cemetery, I've found several other sites that seem really interesting. 

Can anyone recommend some sites they've visited or heard about?  There's no way I'll see everything on my list in a week's time, and I've got to pare it down a tad.  Plus, my wife would like to visit a plantation home (or maybe two), of which I've found many, but not sure which one would be the most enjoyable.  Drayton Hall seems to be the most recognized of the bunch.

Any suggestions are welcome and will be greatly appreciated. 

Sincerely and thankfully,

GenHood



 Posted: Tue May 8th, 2007 08:03 pm
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susansweet
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Getting out my trusty notebook on sights to see in Charleston Here is my list

Confederate Museum run by the Daughters of the Confederacy at Meeting and Market  Upstairs.  Small crowded but not to be missed.  And say hello to the dear little grey hair lady that runs it . She is a gem

 

Hunley remember only open to view on Saturday and Sunday and get there early

Drayton Hall is a must to see but it is only the Home, Orginal condition 12 dollars for the tour.

Magnolia Platation next to it has the plantation house (not orginal, Sherman you know) also have the oldest gardens in America

the other way out of town up 17 is Boone Hill (also restored , Sherman again)  this is the one that looks like Tara.  I really liked this one . See it after you have gone to Fort Moltrie.  Also while at Fort Moltrie drive to the other end of Sullivan Island and visit  the site of Battery Marshall where the Hunley Crew set off on their date with destiny .  Nothing there but a sign but still you are standing on the site.

The Pinkney Plantation is right next to it.  Home is gone I am thinking Sherman again but they have a great display of the history of the Pinkney Family's service to the USA and a display of the slave culture at the Plantation.

If you are driving out of town CSS David model is on display at Old Santee Canal Park Moncks Corner

Magnolia Cemetery see the Hunley Crew but don't forget the Confederate Cemetery i nthe middle of the Graveyard.  Lovely monuments with great engravings. 

Tour a stately home in Charleston Nathaniel Russell House at 51 meeting house has a free standing staircase that spirals three floors  10 dollars for the tour.

Take a Palmetto Carriage tour.  My favorite company . They use mules.  Big Barn is where they leave from about 16 dollars.

Joseph Manigualt House is interesting to see also Manifgualts were involved in Civil War.  Home also has signs of the earthquake on the outside

If you are a Beauregard fan  the the Aiken Rhett house 360 Meeting st is for you .  it was his headquarters during the siege of Sumter.

This one is harder to find . if you go to the plantations like Drayton Hall,  There is Fort Lamar where you can see breast works .  It is Just off State Highway 171 Folly Rd James Island  Edisto Rifles were here.  We had a real hard time finding it but did have a Blue and Gray magazine with story of the Battle of Secessionvilel to help us find it . 

Don't forget to stand on the four corners of Law  City Hall, Court House, Post Office and Church , Meeting and Broad St. 

Marion Square the monuments to Calhoun and Wade Hampton . 

Also meals EAT AT STICKY FINGERS   It is Memphis Bar beque but it is soooo good.

Also have some low country boil  I was lucky to have it at a friends house but find a place in town to try it.

I did not mention the Citadel but I think it does have a museum too. 

Hope this helps.  I make myself a notebook before I start a trip.  Write all the places i might want to go and put times and days of the week they are open , directions how to get there and cost.   I also have pages to write in notes after visiting .  Like in the cemetery I copied down the inscriptions on some of the graves.  The Revolutionary Hero Francis Marion the Swamp Fox has the best.  His grave is way out in the country but near The DAVID.  I can give you directions ifinterest.  I said my interest in the Civil War kept bumping into the Revoution in South Carolina.  

There is also a tea plantation with tours , only tea grown in America that is near Drayton Hall.  again way out at the end of an Island.   Not sure you would want to use up time to go there.  good tea though , I am sure you can find it in Charleston.  American Tea by Bigalow.    I did Tea , Rice Museum and Cotton Museum while I was in South Carolina but they are a ways away from Charleston.

 

Hope this helps .  If you have questions feel free to email me . and No I do not work for the Charleston Visitors Center. I just love the place.

Susan 



 Posted: Thu May 10th, 2007 08:34 pm
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39th Miss. Walker
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Susan, great job!

Also the Battery/ White Point Gardens at the end of the peninsula. A number of cannon and great views of the surrounding area. Ft. Johnson is directly across the water, You can see part of Morris Island, Sumter, Moultrie etc.

The Charleston Museum is a general purpose museum but does have a lot of CW and Rev. War stuff. Very good museum.

Unfortunately there are not a lot of earthworks left and what is there for the most part is on private property. Savannah and the surrounding area has a lot to offer as well.

About 60 or so miles out of Charleston is Rivers Bridge Historic Site. Most of the earthworks are here and good walking trail. $2 per person. Was the only real organized resistance to Sherman in SC. 2 day battle.

Btw if you take a carriage tour don't believe the guide when he tells you the Confederates fired on Ft. Sumter from Charleston proper. The guns never fired a shot in anger, too far away.

Ft. Moultrie is a must stop.

Keep in mind if you go to Sumter on a tour boat the stay is only about an hour which is plenty of time, if a historic explanation isn't given on your tour ask the ranger to point out where the different batteries were.

Have fun in Charleston.



 Posted: Fri May 11th, 2007 03:10 am
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Johan Steele
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Blind Tiger... gotta stop their for a pint & a sandwich.

Pappilion, if it is still there was the finest food in the town IMHO.

Everything else I can remember has been mentioned; though Patriots Point is a worthwhile stop; while not CW it is US military and the Yorktown is outstanding... when I visited 15 odd years ago they would rotate through the daily menu of the Yorktown in WW2... those navy boys ate pretty well and so did I :).

From Charleston you are only a few hours from Savannah... and Columbia.  Both are well worth the vist.  Columbia has the State Capital and the State Museum; IMHO one of the finest in the country and the CS museum in the back half is priceless.  Camden is also only a hop and a skip.

I average 1K miles per week for work so what I call a hop and a skip might be a bit more than most would consider acceptable.  the history in SC is outstanding and well worth a look at a map and a car rental.



 Posted: Fri May 11th, 2007 04:38 am
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Johan I was in South Carolina last fall for two weeks at friends house.  We put over 2,000 miles on his new car sight seeing. 

Camden  Richard Kirkland's grave with canteens on either side, Boykin Mill is near by and a monument to the Battle of Boykin mill is there.  Also Revolutionary Battlefield.  Grave of DeKalb highest ranking officer killed in Revolution.

Columbia the Confederate Relic Room is all new .  Moved to a new site but in the same building as the State museum .  The state museum you can see a ring made of the cane that beat Sumner in the Captial .  Also some of the canes that were donated to Butler later. 

Richard Kirkland's gun, Maxy Gregg's watch and for a while Wade Hampton's sword on loan from the Museum of the Confederacy are all in the Confederate Relic room.  Any one that goes say hey to Tam Davis one of the Docents there. 

Columbia has Elmwood cemetary  the resting place of Maxey Gregg.  Trinty Cathedral and cemetery where you can find States Rights Gist (his middle name is misspelled ), Wade Hampton and Timrod the poet . 

The Hampton Preston Mansion, Maxey Gregg's Home , The Palmetto Monument spared by Union soldiers as it was a monument to Palmetto Brigade from the Mexican War.  Huge Statue of Wade Hampton on Horseback.   AND you can eat at Maurice's . 

Cotton Museum, Rice Museum both very interesting places.  Sheldon Church near Beaufort . 

I am going back in September so adding items to my list. 

Johan they have a new bridge over to Sullivan Island now too. Ravanal Bridge , very beautiful. 

 



 Posted: Fri May 11th, 2007 11:52 am
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Johan Steele
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Maurice's.... ummm what was the rest of that Susan?:)

My wife is from SC w/ family in Columbia & Kingstree among others.  Spent 4+ years at Shaw (Stay Here A While or Swap Husbands & Wives depending on your inclination)  AFB and after my discharge stayed on for a while longer w/ my civilian job... as a result I drove all over the state w/ my servic area being from the Interstate in the East west to Augusta and from Barnwell North to Greenville Spartenburg area.  Pretty countryside and all around decent people.

Liked Charleston and Savannah... though I never got enough time to spend in Savannah.

 

SC has a lot of history and it's an interesting place to drive around and just see.  Charleston is not rpresentative of the state.  Too small to be its own state and too large for an insane asylum.



 Posted: Fri May 11th, 2007 12:17 pm
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susansweet
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It sure is a country full of history.  I also found where ever we went I met the nicest people .  Everyone was so friendly. At the Confederate Relic Room in Columbia I asked the docent if she was Tam the lady I had talked to on the phone before I came from California.  She said she was .  Couldn't beleive I actually remember talking to her.  She was so sweet.  She called one of the directors to come out to show me where Richard Kirklan's gun was.  I mentioned to him a friend had told me it was in the musuem.  This gentleman then gave me a personal tour of the whole musuem pointing out items I would not have noticed .  He would also tell me the story behind them. 

I think I had as much fun talking to the people in the museums or at the historical sites as much as I did seeing the historical site.

Oh another place to go .  In Camden is the old Carnegie Library that is now a archieves and display room.  I went there , talked to the people at the desk.  Next thing I know I was given a file folder full of information on Richard Kirkland to read.  I was told anything I wanted a coipy of to let them know they would make copies.  I now have three letters he wrote to his sister and a poem written about him. 

 



 Posted: Fri May 11th, 2007 10:46 pm
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GenHood
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Susan, Johan and 39th Miss. Walker,

Thank you all so much for your information, tips and suggestions.  I may have to print out all of your replies so I have a comprehensive list of your many wonderful ideas. 

Was a little worried about getting to the Hunley early enough, so I bought tickets online, so that's a done deal and I'm real excited about that.  Just finished "Raising the Hunley" as a primer, and I'm very anxious to see it. 

We're planning a trip down to Savannah and will stop at Columbia en route or on our return trip. 

Again, thank you all very much for your assistance, and I will give you a full report on my excursion upon my return.

Sincerely,

John (GenHood)

 



 Posted: Fri May 11th, 2007 10:56 pm
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John have a great trip.  Glad you got your Hunley tickets.  It wasn't busy the day we were thee, and there was no one else but us in Magnolia Cemetery.  This is a very emotional trip , the ship and the cemetery.   Will look forward to your report.

Susan



 Posted: Sat May 12th, 2007 02:39 pm
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John as you travel down Hwy. 17 from Charleston to Savannah that is basically the Route Prevost took in the Rev. War in the first attempt to take Charleston by the British.
It is also the same route the right wing including the 54th Mass. took towards Charleston as Sherman was headed to Columbia.
Almost all of the marsh areas you see south of the Edisto River were originally rice fields, hand cleared by slaves. The canals are still evident. When you get to the Combahee River the rice field is a mile wide. They are replacing the bridge there. The bridge site was the site of the old Combahee Ferry and was the main destination of the Federal raid of June 2, 1863 which is the Harriet Tubman Raid. The new bridge will be named for her.
Further south at the intersection of Hwy. 17 and Hwy 21 towards Beaufort was the town of Gardens Corner. You can do a tour of Beaufort. It has many buildings from the CW period and many of the homes were used by the Federals including some as hospitals. Where the bridge crosses the Whale Branch River was the site of the Battle of Port Royal Ferry. Also visit the old Arsenal in Beaufort.
Going back up Hwy. 21 turn left back onto Hwy 17 south. A mile down the road across from the development Bull Point is Sheldon Church Rd. A pre-revolutionary Anglican Church burned by the British and again by Sherman. A beautiful site the walls and columns are still standing.
Back on 17 south at the intersection of Hwy's 17 and 17A was the site of the Battle of Pocotaligo. Not much there now. The town was up the dirt road to your right. Nothing but woods now.
Get on I-95 south and get off the interstate at Coosawahatchie. There are numerous historical markers on the old road to the right. At the intersection in front of you is the tracks of CSX but during the CW was the Charleston to Savannah RR. It was the only place the Federals actually reached the RR during the war until Sherman. A small but pitched battle was here where the intersection and the truck stop was. Lee also had his headquarters here. Here again we have lost most to neglect and development.
On to Savannah, go to the visitors center first.
Have fun!



 Posted: Sat May 12th, 2007 03:56 pm
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John:

When you get to Savannah, invest in one of the bus tours early. Each tour is not long; however, they leave every half-hour or 45 minutes and, the prime feature for us was to jump off at any stop and get back on any subsequent one which will be along shortly. It is close to impossible to drive around town.

Do get information before hand so you know which places you want to see rather than watch as the bus goes by.

Ole



 Posted: Sat May 12th, 2007 05:52 pm
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Sheldon Chuch is a lovely sight.  Used by the Patriots to store ammunition in the Revolution , Blown up and burned by the British.   Rebuilt.  Used by the Confederates to store ammunition.  Blown up and burned by Black Jack Logan and his men , part of Sherman's March.  Now left in ruins.   It is a very peaceful site . Just make sure you wear mosquito repellant.  I did my friends didn't They were covered with bites. 

Oh and Black Jack figures again in fire . . . Columbia he occupied the Hampton Preston  mansion.  He had it all set to be torched when he left, but an Ursulane Nun showed up with a signed order from Sherman to give her any house she wanted for her ordered.  Seems Sherman had promised to leave the convent alone but the fire reached the convent and burned it to the ground.  So he gave her any house in Columbia.  She chose the Hampton Preston Mansion.  Logan and his men removed the materials they were going to use to fire the house.  The nuns moved in.  When the war was over the home was returned to the Hampton family. 



 Posted: Sat May 26th, 2007 08:12 pm
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GenHood
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Back from a very enjoyable week in Charleston, SC area.  I thank you all for your very helpful suggestions, many of which played a vital role in my "campaign".  Here's a report, I'll try not to drag it out too much:

 

Maneuvers:  The first engagement on Monday, May 14th consisted of familiarizing ourselves with the city, and taking a carriage ride.  Fairly nice ride through town, picked up some decent intelligence.  Sadly, we were not able to use the company that employed mules.  Great views at The Battery/White Pt. Gardens. A nice place to take a sunset stroll (thanks 39th Miss. Walker)

Tuesday:  Ft. Sumter.  Nice ride out to the fort, great views of the Yorktown,  Charleston and a few of the tall sailing ships in town for the weekend festivities.  Could've used another 30-60 mins at the fort, didn't really get to see much of the museum there.  Later, Ft. Moultrie.  A must see.  Great history from the Revolutionary War until WWII.  Also, enjoyed walking the beach nearby, Hunley marker, and picturesque drive to and on Sullivans Island.  Great view of Ft. Sumter also.

Wednesday:  Ft. Lamar.  Thanks to the directions provided here, found it w/ relative ease.  Nice self-guided tour brochure, and what I assume to be preserved earthworks.  Had the place to myself, nice & quiet.  Next,  Confederate Museum.  What a collection.  The first CSA National Flag flown over Sumter, the signal flag and letter from its bearer, Barnard Bee's sword, an original copy of the ordinance of secession, and an 1850's Masonic apron were among my many favorites at this wonderful site.  Also, tried on two different occasions to see John Calhoun's grave, but cemetery was locked both times.  Also visited the Charleston Museum, nice collection on history of the city, really liked the model of the Pioneer  sub they had inside.  Citadel museum is also a hidden treasure.  Great collection and facts on the history of the Citadel and its Cadets.  Also went to Marion Sq, where I was informed Citadel originally was located.   As stated, Magnolia Cemetery is an emotional visit.  Only myself and a few groundskeepers outdoors, a very nice young lady in the office provided me with a map and locations of prominent features.  A very beautiful, serene place.  Especially moving at the gravesites of Horace Hunley, George Dixon and the other Hunley crewmen.

Thursday:  Drayton Hall and Middleton Place.  The house at Drayton is original, and being preserved, not restored.  A great history lesson on how the home was built, how it operated and the people who lived and worked here.  A visit to the African-American cemetery was very moving.  They were a vital part of the history of Drayton Hall and its people.  Middleton has beautiful gardens, and a "Constitution Tree"  the Drayton Oak.  Beware, there's also an alligator in one of the nearby ponds.

Friday:  R&R.  Sat by the pool, bought some local wines at Boone Hall, and took a leisurely drive on Isle of Palms and Sullivans Island.

Saturday:  THE HUNLEY!!!  This experience cannot be described adequately by my humble words!  When you see that vessel, and its other discovered parts (the rudder, cutwater, spar) the feeling is indescribable.  And to look upon the gold coin Lt. George Dixon carried makes the skin tingle.  If for no other reason, go to Charleston for this.  They say in 6 years the vessel will be ready to display in its own museum, which is currently being readied.  I definitely plan to be there!  Afterward, took a quick trip through the Old Exchange and Provost Dungeon,  walked on board some of the tall sailing ships in town for the Maritime Festival, and regrettably headed back towards home.

Rations:  Magnolias on East Bay, great shrimp and grits served in a smoked sausage gravy.  Vendue Inn, didn't eat there, but their rooftop bar has great views and friendly service.  Also, live music!  Charleston Crab House had tasty She-Crab soup and a decent low-country boil (thanks for the tip Susan).  T-Bonz is just okay, steaks are decent, but my wife ordered well done and it took 3 tries to get it that way.  Sticky fingers, get the rib sampler (thanks again Susan) 4 varieties of tasty ribs.  My fave was Coconut Joe's on Sullivans Island.  Awesom Crab cakes, beautiful views of the ocean, and Palmetto Lager on tap! Also tip of the hat to Johan, made it into the Blind Tiger.  Didn't have time for a sandwich, but had a couple drafts. 

 

Also, on the way to SC, we stopped in Asheville, NC and toured the Biltmore estate.  If you ever get the chance, this is  must see.  Not CW related, but a huge, beautiful home with elaborate sculptures, art and gardens.  Also, the restaurant in the old Carriage house is delicious, and be sure to take home some of the wines from their on site winery.  We visited on Mothers Day and my wife couldn't have been happier. 

Thanks again, very much, to all of you for your very helpful tips, suggestions and hints.  It all led to a very enjoyable trip.

Much appreciation,

John (GenHood) 

P.S.  See photos of my trip at

http://s51.photobucket.com/albums/f383/GenHood/

 

Last edited on Sat May 26th, 2007 08:19 pm by GenHood



 Posted: Sat May 26th, 2007 08:51 pm
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Gen Hood , glad you and your wife had such a good time.  Some of your pictures made me laugh as we must have stood on exactly the same spot .  I enjoyed the walk though memory lane .  Glad I could be of some help.  I think Fort Lamar was a hidden gem to find.  I am going to have to go back there armed with more mosquito protection as I didn't wander far enough the day I was there I was eaten alive and I was wearing bug spray.  

Susan



 Posted: Sat May 26th, 2007 11:03 pm
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The same thing happened to me.  My OFF was powerless against the mosquitoes of the Palmetto State.  Glad you liked the pics



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