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 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 12:35 am
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CleburneFan
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Ellie's Fifties Diner in DelRay Beach, FL has the BEST coconut cream pie ever. That is pure comfort food. It just melts in your mouth.

FedReb, I love the English Trifle. I first had it in Rhodesia way back in the day when it was still called Rhodesia.  Now it is called Zimbabwe.

Hubby's number one comfort food is ice cream, but I have never been much of an ice cream fan.

Oh, how could I forget? I love peanut butter. When we lived in Brazil in the 1960s, there was NO peanut butter. I went three years with no peanut butter. The longer I went, the more I missed peanut butter. And what is really weird...peanut butter gives me asthma, but I allow myself small indulgences of the stuff every once in awhile.



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 12:49 am
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Dixie Girl
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fedreb wrote: You guys sometimes amaze me with your knowledge of the ACW but this thread is really teaching me things. I love the sound of halupkis, fluffer-nutter and shoo fly pie and I'll be looking them up next time in the States. What is scrapple? pierogis? hogjawls? These all sound like a foreign language to me.
My own idea of comfort food would be fish and chips, sausage and mash, cottage pie, spaghetti bolognaise and grilled cheese on toast.
I did once order chipped beef on toast for breakfast in a Ct. diner, my American friends were horrified but I liked it.


fedreb, hogjowls are just what it says its a hogs jowls or jaw meat. its tastes a lot like bacon (or at least i think so) its very good, but as far as i know its only eaten in the South. 



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War Means Fighting And Fighting Means Killing - N. B. Forrest When war does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Stonewall Jackson


 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 12:50 am
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Dixie Girl
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izzy wrote: Joy of Cooking; Rombauer & Becker; the Bobbs-Merrill Company, Indianapolis/NY; 1975 printing:

Pork Scrapple or Goetta:  (About 6 servings)

If you use cornmeal, call it scrapple.  If you use oats, call it goetta.  Place in a pan:  2 pounds pork neck bones or other bony pieces.  Add:  1 and a 1/2 quarts boiling water, 1 sliced onion, 6 peppercorns, (1 bay leaf).

Simmer the pork until the meat falls from the bones.  Strain, reserving the liquor.  There should be about 4 cups.  Add water or light stock if necessary to make this amount.  Using this liquid in place of boiling water, prepare: Cornmeal Mush.  You may substitute 1 cup oatmeal for the cornmeal, in which case, reduce liquid by one cup.  Remove all meat from the pork bones and chop or grind it fine.  Add it to the cooked mush.  Season with:  salt to taste, 1 teaspoon or more grated onion, (1/2 teaspoon dried thyme or sage), a grating of fresh nutmeg, and a little cayenne.'

Pour the scrapple into a bread pan that has been rinsed with cold water.  Let it stand until cold and firm.  Slice it.  To serve, saute slowly in melted butter or drippings.

Cornmeal Mush:

Combine and stir: 1 cup white or yellow cornmeal, 1/2 cup cold water, 1 teaspoon salt.  Place in the top of a double boiler: 4 cups boiling water or water and milk.  Stir cornmeal mixture in gradually.  Cook and stir the mush over quick heat from 2 to 3 minutes.  Steam, covered, over - not in - hot water 25 to 30 minutes.  Stir frequently.  Serve with: maple syrup, honey, molassas, milk or cream.

Or pour the mush into a loaf pan to chill. When firm, slice and saute in cooking fat until slightly crisp and browned.  Serve with honey, maple syrup, or molassas.


ohhh nasty.....people actually eat that????



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War Means Fighting And Fighting Means Killing - N. B. Forrest When war does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Stonewall Jackson


 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 01:00 am
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CleburneFan
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When we lived in Brazil, Hubby began to like the national dish and comfort food feijoada, a heavy black bean (feijao) stew that contained, among other things, pigs' ears and pig knuckles sometimes the nose. It was customary to serve it on Saturdays.  Yuck, I could never quite eat it myself. Pigs' ears make me squeamish. 



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 01:15 am
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Dixie Girl
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i eat pickled pigs feet, not real sure i could stomach the thought of eating a pig ear or nose though



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War Means Fighting And Fighting Means Killing - N. B. Forrest When war does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Stonewall Jackson


 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 01:50 am
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CleburneFan
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Dixie Girl wrote: i eat pickled pigs feet, not real sure i could stomach the thought of eating a pig ear or nose though
Hubby loved crispy pata when we lived in the Philippines. Crispy Pata is pig's knuckle.



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 03:47 am
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PvtClewell
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Pigs have knuckles?

Is that where their wings are connected?



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 04:46 am
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susansweet
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Fan  I love peanut butter but have to keep it out of the house as I will go though the jar in a day or two if I bring one home.  Crunchy only of course. 

Big fan of ice cream but again not on my list of foods I want to eat right now.  Have found a little place down the street a ways that makes low fat low cal yogurt.  They have great flavors.  One is just called Tart.  I get a cup of frozen yogurt several different flavors in the cup , you fill your own .  I buy it there always have some kind of Chocolate , some other flavor and a dab of tart on top.  Gets my caving for ice cream out and at least half the calories.   Don't bring it into the house at all . 

Susan



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 07:37 am
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fedreb
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izzy,
Cottage pie is just like shepherds pie only made with lamb instead of beef. Mash in sausage and mash is potatoes mashed with swede and parsnip and a little garlic.
C/fan,
Please don't mention trifle, it is one of my very favourite desserts and I have just put on 2 pounds thinking about it but it has to be homemade the commercial stuff they sell in supermarkets is dreadful.
I think I'll pass on the scrapple.And the hogjaws.



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 11:38 am
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izzy
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You people are making me so hungry that I got busy and made a version of hoppin john yesterday.  I soaked up a couple cups of black eyed peas then finished them in a 2 cups of braising liquid I had left from a picnic (smoked) ham shoulder.  I added 3 diced carrots, a whole mess of fresh picked turnip greens, 4 chopped roma tomatoes, leftover ham, and a big pinch of dried oregano.  I served it over brown rice.  Yum! 

I still have the fixin's for beef vegetable soup.  I'll tackle that today.  I am rapidly running out of room in my refridgerator.  Guess I'll have to start freezing some of it up.  Better yet I think I will activate the "Eat and Run Cafe".  If I make a big pot of soup, stew, etc., I call up some of the little old widows from our parish and invite them to the "Cafe".  They know the drill:  arrive at 5PM, get your own silverware, plate, napkin, drink, etc.  Serve your self from the pot on the stove.  We sit down and have a nice meal and chat together.  By 6PM everything is cleaned up and they are out the door.  They are home before dark and sitting in front of the TV ready for their favorite news program.  Now lets see, who was on that list?



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 12:42 pm
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ole
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I think I'll pass on the scrapple.And the hogjaws.
Scrapple is one of those regional things born of a sincere desire to let nothing go to waste. (Although the end-product itself is a waste.) Hogjowls are simply the cheeks of a hog smoked and cured like bacon. Although generally with a higher fat content than bacon, it serves more as seasoning than actual food.

Another particularly disgusting "delicacy" is chitlin's (chitterlings) -- another example of wringing the last bit of nutrition out of a pig. Still another is headcheese, although I understand that some actually consider it a comfort food.

Before the era of the freezer, sausage and cheese and smoked meats were the methods of choice for preserving protein over a long winter.

And last, but not least, the regional anamolies were largely responsible for 'cue. Wealthier people would eat high on the hog -- hams and loin chops -- leaving the ribs and trotters for those less fortunate. At least that little bit of history worked out well.

ole



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 02:48 pm
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Dixie Girl
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ole wrote: I think I'll pass on the scrapple.And the hogjaws.Hogjowls are simply the cheeks of a hog smoked and cured like bacon. Although generally with a higher fat content than bacon, it serves more as seasoning than actual food.

i eat it as an actual food. i love it, it and fatback, and as you said it makes a great seasoning for veggies and stuff



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War Means Fighting And Fighting Means Killing - N. B. Forrest When war does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Stonewall Jackson


 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 05:38 pm
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TimK
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When I got up this morning I put a cheap roast and a jar of pepperinis in the crock pot. I have to cook it outside since I work at home and don't want the smell to make me sick before I have a chance to eat it. I cook it for about 12 hours and then eat it on some fresh hard rolls. I don't know if it has a technical name, but I call it good eatin'. And since it is Friday, I will follow it up with some sippin'. Life is good.



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 06:00 pm
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ole
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Better hope that you're genetically immune to lard, Girl. The taste is heavenly, but many, many will pay for their indulgence.

Maybe this ought to be on the comfort-thread, but on top of the wood-stove was an ocher enamelled cup. This is where the bacon and ham grease went. And in it was a cloth. The cloth would be used to wipe the baking or frying pan with bacon grease. You don't want it to stick, wipe it with bacon grease. This was used to fry potatoes, eggs, and a dollop or two more would work with chicken. It worked with catfish and shortening for almost everything. Where it didn't work, lard was the choice.

Mother would make ginger snaps. Aside from the traditional ingredients, bacon fat was the shortening. And you can't make a decent pie-crust unless you use real lard. Are we missing something here?

Where I came from, people ate this sort of ill-advised food all of their lives and managed to reach their late 80s in spite of it. Many of them got into their 90s.

The conditions for your ancestors, and his, and hers, and mine differed only slightly. We all ate stuff that appears strange to each other. But check it out. Every group of people designed their diet around what was available as to protein, carbs, and maybe more than a little bit of fat. While the Italians and Chinese and a few other groups ate pasta, the northern Europeans ate potatoes. Same difference.

In Central and South America, they eventually figured out that a combination of beans and corn was every bit as nutritious as a rib-eye. (Rare and salted only.) Chicken is as good for you as a pork chop.

A person has to have protein, carbs, and that which comes from veggies and fruits. A centuries-old process of figuring out that which maintains. So. When you figure that the Germans ate differently than the French or Italians or Brits, they still settled on the fomula of protein, carbs, and that which comes from veggies and fruits. Each had centuries of developing that which worked for them.

So, while we get comfort food from gramma and her mother, there is a design behind it. This sustains life. (That it might not be good for you is entirely beside the point.)

One of these days, someone is going to be able to evaluate your genes and be able to accurately tell you what you, personally, ought to avoid. Like, "gravy is going to kill you." Or, "You really ought to avoid ice cream."

We're not there yet, but we're getting there. And, until someone tells me that I can no longer have a hot roast-beef sandwich. I'll have one whenever I can find or make one. (And, when that someone does, I have an unused finger with which to make a salute to his/her advice.)

I'm guessing that all of us like our thing, and woe to the person who decides that we ought not have it.



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 06:20 pm
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fedreb
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I have just finished eating a good Cornish Pasty ( sometimes called a Whores Purse because it is crimpted tight shut and its anybodys guess what is in it) which has questionable nutritional value but hot out of the oven is just wonderful to eat. There must be some truth in the old adage " a little of what you fancy does you good"



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 07:26 pm
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izzy
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In that cookbook I tripped across another recipe of which I can say, "Never in a million years!"  I always wondered what head cheese was.  Here's the answer:

Head Cheese or Brawn:  (4 servings)

A well-liked old-fashioned dish of jellied meat.  Have the butcher skin and quarter a calf head.  Clean teeth with a stiff brush and remove ears, brains, eyes, snout and most of the fat.  Soak the quarters about 6 hours in cold water to extract the blood.  Wash them.  Barely cover with fresh cold water, to which you may add: 2 onions and 5 cut-up celery ribs.  Simmer until the meat is ready to fall from the bones, about 2 to 3 hours.  Drain but reserve stock.  Chip the meat off the bones.  Dice it.  Reduce the stock by one-half.  Cover the meat well with the stock.  Reserve the brains. 

Now add: 1 tablespoon salt, 1 teaspoon pepper, 1/8 teaspoon hot pepper sauce, 1/2 teaspoon mace or sage.  Cook for 1/2 hour.  Pour into a mold and cover with a cloth.  Put a weight on top.  Chill.  serve, cut into slices, with French dressing to which you have added the diced cooked brains.

BARF! 

(Although I have to admit that I would probably eat this first before I would ever eat bugs.  The preparation of head cheese is certainly the most grotesque recipe I've seen so far.)



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 07:34 pm
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ole
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Where's the bugs? Where's my spoon?

Really, Izzy! Did you have to do that?

ole



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 07:45 pm
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izzy
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Sorry! 



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 07:52 pm
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izzy
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OK, you're all safe now.  I have put the cookbook back on the shelf.  It is fun to look through those old cookbooks now and then.  I remember one old recipe that began:  Take one small bear....

Alright, alright!  I'll stop.



 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 07:56 pm
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pamc153PA
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Head cheese as a comfort food?? To whom?? Certainly not to the calf--certainly not to ME!

Ole, the first time some doctor looks at my DNA and tells me I have to avoid ice cream, I'll be looking for a new doctor.

I kind of like "all things in moderation" idea, except when it comes to chocolate, then there is no such thing as moderation.

Pam



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