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 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2008 08:06 pm
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pamc153PA
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My husband is a Spanish teacher and he makes a soup called posole several times a year that is basically glorified chicken soup, with a ham hock thrown in for added flavor. It also has hominy in it, and I think I like the texture as much as the taste, since hominy seems to take on the taste of whatever else is with it. The soup is fun to eat, because there are toppings like green onions, lettuce, cilantro, limes and crushed tortilla chips, along with green salsa, that you can put in, or not, depending on your preference.

Speaking of cilantro, that seems to be the sort of herb you either love or hate. I love it, grow lots of it in my garden, but some people have commented to me that it tastes like stinky feet!

As for the talk of spicy stuff and peppers, my favorite right now is a pepper called Lemon Drop, which looks like a little yellow banana but packs a powerful punch. I've made pepper jelly with it, besides using it in chili, etc., and Lemon Drop pepper jelly with goat cheese on toasted French bread will definitely get you breaking a sweat!

Pam



 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2008 08:08 pm
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ole
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sorry 'bout that Ole....(shouldn't it be with a capitol "o"?)
As a proper name, it ought to be, Captain. But I'm far too modest.:shock:

ole



 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2008 08:20 pm
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ole
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Izzy:

You've inspired me. I dropped about a hunnert at the store this morning and on the stovetop, as we speak, is a pot of chili, the beginning of a pot of pulled pork, and the opening move on a mess of potato salad.

Oh. And Dear One came up with a tedious way to make potato chips. (This will teach me to buy a 10# bag of Idahoes.) The technique is to slice them, lay them out on a cookie sheet and freeze them. And then put them in a bag in the freezer. Sounds much more complicated than necessary, but I'll have to admit that the frozen chips fry up noticeably better than the unfrozen ones.

One of these days I'll have to sit down and cipher if we're saving anything, but the home-made chips are better, and the rest of the bag doesn't go stale and get tossed. (Another gimmick, if you have a deep-fryer, is to just cut up tortillas and fry them crisp. Usually better than buying a bag of whatever.)

Just love the deep-fryer. Do up just about anything but red meat. Ore-Ida puts fries in the freezer case that are everybit as good as your choice of fast-food joints. Throw a burger on the grill and a double-handful of slender potatoes in the fryer, and you've beat their price by a considerable margin. We use it mostly for chicken-wings, catfish, and fries, but it works very well on lots of other things. (No. It doesn't add a lot of fat to the food. Pour in a fresh gallon, use it for many weeks until it gets grody, and discard all but about a quarter-cup of the original gallon. (A quarter-cup of peanut oil over a couple of months is not going to hurt if you are given to an occasional pizza and maybe some sausage gravy.)

ole

Last edited on Mon Nov 10th, 2008 08:29 pm by ole



 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2008 08:25 pm
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izzy
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calcav:  I am really, really, really afraid to ask what is in a "slug"burger.  Please say it ain't so.

Cilantro is the same as shaving bar soap into your food as far as I am able to make out the taste.  Lime helps it out alot.  Cilantro, anise, mace, coriander are not in my recipes.  I have never been able to get an olive down either, including olive oil.

Pam:  Try a bit of cumin in that chicken soup.  I use that spice as a variant when I get tired of the same old chicken soup recipe.



 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2008 08:32 pm
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ole
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My husband is a Spanish teacher and he makes a soup called posole several times a year that is basically glorified chicken soup, with a ham hock thrown in for added flavor.
Now that sounds good! Could you trouble him for the recipe?

Next question: Is he Spanish and teaches something else? Or is he something else and teaches Spanish? Just a thought.

Ole (there ya go, Captain. It does eliminate come confusion. Thanks for the prompt.)



 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2008 08:33 pm
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izzy
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Ole:  Homemade rocks!  You can tweek the recipes just the way you like them.

I knew I should have stayed away from this thread.  Now I'm itching to make a pot of chili too!  I also can hardly wait to make a cottage or shepherd's pie, which ever one uses beef.  I forget which is which now.  To make room in the fridge, I've started hauling plastic containers of food to all the little old ladies at church and anybody else I can think of.



 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2008 08:45 pm
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browner
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I haven't tried a cottage pie (isn't that lamb?) but love a shepherd's pie.

nita

Last edited on Mon Nov 10th, 2008 08:48 pm by browner



 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2008 08:50 pm
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browner
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ole, I will have try that with potato chips. I love potato chips!



 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2008 08:52 pm
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calcav1
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Izzy

A local diner invented the slugburger during the depression. Because beef was so expensive he mixed in some ground pork and a lot of soy. He made a very thin patty and deep fried it and served it on a bun with mustard, pickle and onion. He charged a nickel a piece for them, and since a nickle was called a slug, a slugburger was a five cent burger. And you thought it would be escargot! Nowadays they are just pork and soy and the price has gone up to a buck. They are real artery hardeners but they are tasty.

And for the record, cilantro is the most awesome herb in the culinary world.

Tom



 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2008 09:10 pm
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ole
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"Now I'm itching to make a pot of chili too!"

I'm way ahead of you. Chili and beef stew take two days. At this time of year. I can put the pot outside overnight and let it rest there before starting it again in the morning. And this is the time to start making chicken stock. Boil a bunch of backs and necks and carcasses collected over the summer. Chill them thoroughly, scoop off the solidified fat the next morning, heat it again and strain through Handi-Wipes.

When you have a chicken soup that turns to jelly in the fridge, you have a chicken soup.

Last edited on Mon Nov 10th, 2008 09:12 pm by ole



 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2008 11:21 pm
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pamc153PA
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Oh, izzy, I'm sorry to hear about your aversion to olives. I could live on them--green. black, especially kalamata olives. And I use olive oil instead of any other kind, except in baking because it flavors the batter strangely.

The cumin, though, is a good idea. I use that pretty much. I make this spicy creamed pumpkin soup with cumin and turmeric and a good dose of red pepper flakes. Doesn't last too long around here!

I'll see if I can dig up the posole recipe, ole. Do you have a ham hock handy?? ;)

Pam



 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2008 11:46 pm
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Captain Crow
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javal1 wrote: Cpt.,

If you like spicy chile, allow me to make a suggestion. Google "Datil Pepper". I think that about the only place you can by it is in St. Augustine, but you can order it via various websites. As a guy who loves spice, I'm always on the lookout for a pepper that doesn't just overpower the taste of the dish, but can make you sweat while tasing good as well. Datil pepper fits the bill. In our pantry I have a case of Datil mustard, a case of Datil ketchup, and a case of Datil Pepper powder.
Thanks! I'll look into that. I do indeed love spicy food...but not just for heats sake...as you said something that can make you sweat while tasting good fills the bill nicely.



 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2008 11:48 pm
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Dixie Girl
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hot sauce on grits.....why would i wanna ruin a bowl of grits like that??? ill pour hot sauce on most anything but not grits



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 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2008 11:53 pm
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ole
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Cilantro is essential, but it is way to easy to use too much.

Can't get enough of olives. Am partial to those that are black and dried in salt. I sprinkle broken olives on my salads and have a handful or two while I'm puttering. It is, truly, unfortunate that olives are an anathema. Different strokes. But I do not use olive oil. When I'm frying up something, I do not want that taste to intrude.

Dear One spritzes it onto a salad now and then, but it doesn't figure when I'm in the kitchen. On the other hand, olive oil infused with garlic poured over a pasta has been known to send her off. (At the time, I make a hot dog.)

And here's one for you chicken fans. Chinese Chicken courtesy Jeff Smith, the "Frugal Gourmet."

Get a big pot of water boiling. Plunk in a whole chicken. Take out the chicken. When the water resumes boiling, put the chicken back in. Turn off the heat and cover. Wait 45 minutes.

Cart it back out. When you can touch it, pull the meat apart, pile it on a plate with some chopped scallions. Pour some smoking sesame oil over that.

The chicken is just barely done. And when you peel the rest off the bones, with the juice and pack it in a bowl and refrigerate it, You can slice the jellied chicken in whatever you'd like tomorrow. And you can boil the carcass for your next round of chicken soup.

The chicken is done, but just barely. But it is a fine, new way to serve chicken.

Not my comfort food, but about every three months, I do have to make one for her dinner. So. Although it is not mine, it is hers. Does that count?

Ole



 Posted: Tue Nov 11th, 2008 12:13 am
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ole
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Over here, in flyover country, they occasionally celebrate burgoo. This is officially what you picked up on the way to the party. We're talking radgits and squirrels and maybe a lamb , with wild garlic and onions.

As no one traipses across the prairie digging up stuff or shooting anything and everything they came across, it's become quite civilized. But the tradition lives. So in some of the western counties, they still hold burgoo festivals. Nevermind that today's burgoo doesn't include venison. (Out of season, doncha know.) As I understand it, there isn't even that mutton. Guess it doesn't make much difference how they make it and from what. They're having a really good time pretending.

I've never seen a reason to interfere with someone's view of history with actual fact. There are historical, well-meaning parties, and the old fart who is bent on jacking everyone into keeping things in line. Party on!

Ole



 Posted: Tue Nov 11th, 2008 10:14 am
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izzy
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Calcav:  I'm very glad to hear that "slug" refers to the monetary value of a slugburger.  They sound tasty, artery clogging, but tasty.

Ole:  Amen.  You know how to make the real deal chicken stock.  Food for the gods.



 Posted: Tue Nov 11th, 2008 12:46 pm
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ole
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Too much to respond to!

Izzy: I have a stainless steel, five-gallon stock pot and I use it. A lot. These days, I can't just wander into a store and pick up a few pounds of backs and necks. The last time I did that I had to make a special order and the minimum was 40 pounds. Wasn't that bad at about $0.20 per pound, but the chicken "broth" one might buy just doesn't cut it -- too much salt and usually all chemically enhanced flavor. A scoop of the jellied stock makes almost everything better than just water or broth. And, being a lady, it has bunches of highly digestible calcium.

Forgot to mention that I also have marinating some sliced brisket I will today convert into jerky.

With you, I'm going to have to stop reading this thread, as I have an overwhelming urge to make monkey bread!

Ole

Last edited on Tue Nov 11th, 2008 12:50 pm by ole



 Posted: Tue Nov 11th, 2008 01:00 pm
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izzy
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Ole:  A FIVE GALLON stock pot?!  I don't think I could pick it up.  Nevertheless, I'm jealous, very jealous.  You need a big freezer for all the food that could produce.



 Posted: Wed Nov 12th, 2008 02:23 am
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Johan Steele
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OK... 7 pages of hungry. You all is mean, just mean.



 Posted: Wed Nov 12th, 2008 02:58 am
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Dixie Girl
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Johan Steele wrote: OK... 7 pages of hungry. You all is mean, just mean.
poor Johan, come on down to NC and ill fix you up something good to eat :P



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