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 Posted: Fri May 1st, 2009 04:30 pm
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chrisfingle
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Johan, have you read "SEABISCUIT" ? I thought it was just a great read. A book that I drag out often for re-reading is "SON OF THE MORNING STAR". I love it.

I never liked 'listening' to books, and still don't, but while driving once I came upon a gentleman reading SOTMS live over the air on the radio on a program called 'The Book Club'. I was scanning for good music when I hit that station and it immediately grabbed my attention. I ordered the book for my own reading but still listened to the program every week until it was done, because his reading of it live was so perfect.

I'd love to find a tape of it today, it was done so well.

Last edited on Fri May 1st, 2009 04:31 pm by chrisfingle



 Posted: Fri May 1st, 2009 05:53 pm
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ashbel
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Chris

Nothing But Victory about The Army of the Tennessee by Steven Woodworth is a great book.  Woodworth has a very easy-to-read style and is an excellent historian.  I am thankful there is now a good history of this important Army.

I just finished Dee Brown's book on the American West.  Am half-way through Craig Symonds book on Patrick Cleburne - Stonewall of the West.  Both are well written and added to my knowledge of subjects I had always wanted to learn more about.

 



 Posted: Fri May 1st, 2009 11:43 pm
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pamc153PA
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I did love Nothing But Victory, Chris. I learned so much from that book, and I've referenced it often since. It was easy to read (compared to some "stuffier" books) and also easy to understand. To anyone who hasn't read it, I'd highly recommend it.

Right now I just finished This Nation of Suffering by Drew Gilpin, and that, too, was really terrific--if you can say that about death and the grieving process.

I read Noe's Perryville long enough ago that I think I'd have to reread or skim it again, but I do have Robertson's A.P. Hill, unread as of yet. I got it in a fit of biographies awhile ago. Maybe joining the chat group will motivate me to read it!

I think I'll reread my favorite parts of Sears' Chancellorsville in honor of the anniversary, before I head into my next CW book. So many to choose from!

Pam



 Posted: Thu May 7th, 2009 10:43 pm
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Captain Crow
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I am currently struggling to finish Cozzens "This Terrible Sound:the Battle of Chickamauga" and hoping to make it through"the Shipwreck of Their Hopes: The Battles for Chattanooga" in the next three weeks.....man this guy likes to pile on the detail.....and not the most entertaining writer I've ever encountered. On the plus side his research seems solid and he provides lots of maps and good OOBs in each book. I'm starting to think of historians and good writers as two separate groups with very few exceptions.



 Posted: Fri May 8th, 2009 12:02 am
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CleburneFan
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Just finished Noe's "Perryville: This Grand Havoc of Battle" today. Speaking of OOB's, I like the way Noe added killed, wounded and missing statistics to every corps, division, brigade and regiment in his OOBs. One can see at a glance which divisons, brigades and regiments suffered most. One can also see how incomplete the statistics were, especially on the Confederate side.

This is mid-May, so this is the time of the year I start reading about the Gettysburg Campaign's early preparations. I might stick in a light fiction book first, though, because "Perryville" really was seriously sad reading. It took endurance to read the book.



 Posted: Fri May 8th, 2009 01:36 am
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The Iron Duke
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I am currently struggling to finish Cozzens "This Terrible Sound:the Battle of Chickamauga" and hoping to make it through"the Shipwreck of Their Hopes: The Battles for Chattanooga" in the next three weeks.....man this guy likes to pile on the detail.....and not the most entertaining writer I've ever encountered. On the plus side his research seems solid and he provides lots of maps and good OOBs in each book. I'm starting to think of historians and good writers as two separate groups with very few exceptions.
I completely agree Cap'n.  I thought No Better Place to Die was a fantastic read but This Terrible Sound was a chore.  His book on Corinth was decent.  I don't have the heart to tackle his volume on Chattanooga.  I still feel that Wiley Sword's description of Franklin in The Confederacy's Last Hurrah is the best battle narration I've read.



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 Posted: Fri May 8th, 2009 01:51 am
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CleburneFan
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Yes, Sword can make you feel and see the battle. I also thought he masterfully described the forlorn retreat of the Army of Tennessee beaten and battered (and many barefoot) after Nashville. One can just feel the melancholy and despair.

That is an incredible book. Someone who posts here once in awhile has expressed at different times that he believes Sword to be unfair to John Bell Hood.



 Posted: Fri May 8th, 2009 05:44 am
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susansweet3
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That someone would be Sam Hood a decendent of John Bell Hood



 Posted: Sat May 9th, 2009 05:12 pm
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Captain Crow
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The Iron Duke wrote: I am currently struggling to finish Cozzens "This Terrible Sound:the Battle of Chickamauga" and hoping to make it through"the Shipwreck of Their Hopes: The Battles for Chattanooga" in the next three weeks.....man this guy likes to pile on the detail.....and not the most entertaining writer I've ever encountered. On the plus side his research seems solid and he provides lots of maps and good OOBs in each book. I'm starting to think of historians and good writers as two separate groups with very few exceptions.
I completely agree Cap'n.  I thought No Better Place to Die was a fantastic read but This Terrible Sound was a chore.  His book on Corinth was decent.  I don't have the heart to tackle his volume on Chattanooga.  I still feel that Wiley Sword's description of Franklin in The Confederacy's Last Hurrah is the best battle narration I've read.
NBPTD and "The Darkest Days of the War" were both nice reads imo. I think maybe his story telling got lost in the minutia of details and research in his later volumes. I have the Sword book as well but I am reluctant to dig into it with an open mind after  so many doubts have been raised regarding his apparent biases and slanted approach to certain individuals ala Hood etc....hey I'm looking at the gift shop header on this page and noticing a new Winston Groom book on Vicksburg...must have boooook!



 Posted: Sun May 10th, 2009 12:50 am
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The Iron Duke
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Sword's description of Civil War combat is quite good especially when he starts talking about Opdycke's counterattack at the Carter House. Regardless of how one feels about Sword's take on Hood, his narration of Franklin is worth your time, IMO.

Last edited on Sun May 10th, 2009 12:50 am by The Iron Duke



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 Posted: Sun May 10th, 2009 01:09 am
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Henry
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The Official Records of the War of the Rebellion, with emphasis on the Naval records, has been daily fare here for the last four years. The realization that the Crimean War was precedent for many of the events that occured in Mr. Lincoln's war has added to the scope of enquiry.



 Posted: Wed May 27th, 2009 03:01 pm
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fedreb
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Whilst on holiday recently I picked up a book by John Baldwin and Ron Powers called "Last Flag Down", the story of the commerce raider Shenandoah. It is written from the daily log of Lt Conway Whittle, the ships executive officer and ancestor of author John Baldwin. It gives the reader a very good feel of how tough life at sea was, not only the daily routine drudgery of working a sailing ship but of being alone at sea, no home port to run to and unsure of who your friends were or even if your country was still at war, whilst hunting down and taking many prizes from the US merchant and whaling fleets and in that respect it is a very good book. I do feel though that it is very harsh in its treatment of the Captain, James I Waddell, who it would seem was only aboard the ship so that he could be blamed for everything that went wrong whilst his young exec is credited with everything right. Maybe that's how it was, maybe not, and it certainly has me searching now for other accounts of the Shenandoahs' epic voyage,  those of Captain Waddell and other officers and crew members.



 Posted: Wed May 27th, 2009 06:16 pm
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CoryB
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Well I'm reading two things:

For my MFA in Creative Writing: Buried Child - a Play by Sam Shepard

For Civil War Interest: The Gettysburg Campaign: A Study in Command by Coddington.....gotta get ready for that LBG test somehow.



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 Posted: Thu May 28th, 2009 12:09 am
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Captain Crow
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fedreb wrote: Whilst on holiday recently I picked up a book by John Baldwin and Ron Powers called "Last Flag Down", the story of the commerce raider Shenandoah. It is written from the daily log of Lt Conway Whittle, the ships executive officer and ancestor of author John Baldwin. It gives the reader a very good feel of how tough life at sea was, not only the daily routine drudgery of working a sailing ship but of being alone at sea, no home port to run to and unsure of who your friends were or even if your country was still at war, whilst hunting down and taking many prizes from the US merchant and whaling fleets and in that respect it is a very good book. I do feel though that it is very harsh in its treatment of the Captain, James I Waddell, who it would seem was only aboard the ship so that he could be blamed for everything that went wrong whilst his young exec is credited with everything right. Maybe that's how it was, maybe not, and it certainly has me searching now for other accounts of the Shenandoahs' epic voyage,  those of Captain Waddell and other officers and crew members."Sea of Gray-The around the World Odyssey of the Confederate Raider Shenandoah" by Tom Chaffin - Hill and Wang 2006 should fill the bill nicely. It's not only good history...it's a fine read as well.



 Posted: Thu May 28th, 2009 02:22 am
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The Iron Duke
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I thought Sea of Gray was painfully dry.  I just started Nolan's book on the Iron Brigade.



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 Posted: Thu May 28th, 2009 10:14 pm
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Captain Crow
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The Iron Duke wrote: I thought Sea of Gray was painfully dry.  I just started Nolan's book on the Iron Brigade.trust me..after spending the last month struggling through Cozzen's western campaign trilogy "Sea of Gray" seems very moist indeed:D.



 Posted: Thu May 28th, 2009 11:28 pm
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susansweet3
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Reading Perryvill This Grand Havoc of Battle by Noe
Getting ready to go to Perryville



 Posted: Fri May 29th, 2009 02:15 pm
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Old North State
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I know you'll enjoy the visit to the Perryville battlefield.  Not only is it interesting militarily, but it is a beautiful and peaceful place.:)



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 Posted: Fri May 29th, 2009 02:38 pm
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susansweet3
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I am so excited to see it and to see Richmond



 Posted: Fri May 29th, 2009 02:56 pm
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Old North State
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Richmond is a bit more difficult to imagine.  Have you read a good book about it?



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