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 Posted: Thu Oct 25th, 2012 06:44 pm
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Darryl
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Many years ago my friend and I made my first trip to Gettysburg. He had been there before. What happened one night still boggles my mind.
We were heading back to where we were camped at about 1015 at night. We walked by Servant's and noticed a light in the window of the house across the street. At that time, I did NOT know the story of John Reynold's sweetheart sitting with his body in that house.
We went across the street and looked in the window. There was the body of a man in a union general's uniform stretched out on a cot with a young woman sitting beside the cot in a chair reading a book by the lamplight. I thought wow, what a nice touch! We made a note to let Servant's know we liked the set up the next morning.
When we went back, the next day, the house was set up like a business and there was no way, they could have redone it over night. About 8 months later I was reading Mark Nesmith's latest book of the ghosts of Gettysburg, when I came upon the description of the scene we saw!! I about fell off my friends couch. My friend Linda said I got really pale and she thought that there was something wrong.
I told her what had happened. Later on my next trip over there, I got to talk to Mark and told him about it. He told me I wasn't the only one to see it, other people had experienced it too. There have been other experiences rather strange over there.



 Posted: Tue Dec 18th, 2012 07:08 am
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Anastasia
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I'm sorry, we just sell the game.If you like, you can come here: http://www.mmomesos.com and http://www.diablo4shop.com, I am here waiting for you!



 Posted: Sat Oct 5th, 2013 12:49 am
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Well it's October again. Almost three years to the day since this thread started. I thought I'd start things off where I started back in 2010 with Richard Walser's North Carolina Legends. This time it's not really a ghost story, but it is a legend related to the war.

Anyone who knows much about North Carolina knows that the state is known as the Old North State and as the Tar Heel State. Now there are a number of legends as to why North Carolina became the Tar Heel State and you've probably read some of them yourselves. Walser's version is among the versions that come out of the Civil War.

According to this version the nickname for the state and North Carolinians was originally an insult among their fellow Confederates. They were viewed as poor and ignorant and it was easy to make fun of the troops from North Carolina. Especially since they often were barefoot, and some of these barefoot troops would enter battle with pine pitch on their feet.

But things changed when North Carolinian troops went into battle along side Virginian and South Carolinian troops. In this unnamed battle the boys from Virginia and South Carolina broke and retreated while the boys from North Carolina held fast.

After he battle the Virginians and South Carolinians, so the story goes, decided to make light of their own cowardice and suggest that it was supposed to be a retreat and the tar on their feet wouldn't let the North Carolinians follow suit. Someone asked "Any more tar down in the Old North State, boys?" Some North Carolinian shot back "No, not a bit. Old Jeff Davis has bought it all up." Which prompted a South Carolinian to ask "Is that so? What's he going to do with it?" The prideful answer, and perhaps meant to be a bit insulting in response to the insults hurled at the North Carolinians for having tar on their heels, was "He's going to put it on you'ns heels to make you stick better in the next battle."

How true it is, who knows, but this exchange reached the ears of Robert E. Lee and he is said to have said "God bless the Tar Heel boys!"

Not a ghost story, but like I said it is a legend related to the war. And one some of you may have seen in various forms.



 Posted: Sat Oct 5th, 2013 05:49 am
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The old railroad track ways aren't only haunted by the Lincoln funeral train. Tony Reevy relates the tale of a particular railroad that gained notoriety during the war in his Ghost Train! American Railroad Ghost Legends.

The Western and Atlantic Railroad is famed today for the Great Locomotive Chase. But it is also haunted by the ghost of a Confederate soldier buried just north of the Allatoona Pass. Apparently the man was returning to his unit and having to pass through Federal lines, leading to his death. He was then buried near the track.

Railroaders working the area near his grave have claimed to see his ghost wandering the tracks with a lantern, searching for his friends. Perhaps still searching for his unit. Some have also seen the ghost of the soldier's dog which is said to sometimes run in front of a train until it passes by the soldier's grave.

The best report comes from a Polly Milan who at one time was an engineer on the railroad. And one of the engineers on the run past the grave site. One night the train he was driving past the grave broke down, forcing him to walk past the grave and flag don any approaching trains in warning. As he was passing the grave the ghost of the Confederate soldier suddenly appeared, walking towards him. The ghost then proceeded to sit down on the ties. Milan tried to gather up the courage to talk to the ghost and even touch him, but in the end he did what most of us would do when confronted with a ghost. Ran away in terror.



 Posted: Sat Oct 5th, 2013 11:24 pm
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This next story comes from Nancy Roberts' Ghosts of the Carolinas. In some ways it reminds me a little of Edgar Allan Poe's The Masque of the Red Death.

In late August 1862 the steamer Kate left Nassau for Wilmington, North Carolina. This is likely the same Kate that was reported lost near Fort Caswell November 18, 1862 in an article from the North Carolina Whig dated November 25, 1862. It may also be the side wheel steamer Wikipedia calls the CSS Kate (the date and location suggest their one in the same). The people of Wilmington may not have welcomed the Kate had they known what was to follow. It is through the experiences of a local doctor that Roberts tells us the story of what happened to make Wilmington, as she titled the story, a City of Death that September.

For a week days Dr. James H. Dickson had been treating a sick child against a disease supposedly new to Wilmington in September 1862. This disease so terrified the country people that the were no longer willing to risk their own lives to bring supplies into the city. Dr. Dickson had just lost his young patient after a week of futilely trying to save the child's life. And they weren't the first he'd lost, he'd been powerless to save close friends from this horror. It had no care for station in life. Wealthy business men or dirt poor paupers, it struck all down just the same. And worse was the rumors of a faceless horror roaming the streets of Wilmington, a grim reaper cutting down all in the city. Burning barrels of tar were being used to try and purify the air and supposedly on the morning of the child's death Dr. Dickson thought this the perfect setting for such a rumored evil spirit.

At the moment he was leaving the scene of the child's death a gust of wind blew past and he felt what seemed a soft cloak brush against his face. Yet when he tried to defend himself against it he found nothing there. It was as if the rumors were true and he had come into contact with this faceless horror.

Recovering from his own terror he continued on his way to his home. But his terror once more began to return when, nearing his home, he saw movement in the shadows. Surely this was the same thing that had brushed his face outside the child's home come for him. As there is no escaping the reaper when your time has come the doctor found the courage to approach and discovered he need not have feared. It was only an old man, a Mr. Fairly, who had come seeking his services. The man's only daughter, recently made a widow just a week before thanks to the Battle of Antietam (Sharpsburg) was in need of medical attention. Despite his exhaustion he allowed himself to be led to the Fairly house, but it was already too late to do more than comfort the dying young woman. The Fairly's only daughter was already hemorrhaging badly when Dr. Dickson arrived. All he could was prescribe fruit juices to comfort the dying woman in her final days, tortured in the knowledge that the Fairly's probably wouldn't be able to get them thanks to the Federal blockade.

The next morning he continued his rounds of trying to help the inflicted of Wilmington somehow survive this dreadful illness. At every house he stopped someone always asked him if the rumors were true. At the home of the Lassiters James Lassiter asked if it true that the nameless horror, which he called "The Thing" had killed Ben Trumble the night before. Dr. Dickson could only shake his head, too tired to respond.

At home he would write exhaustedly in his journal even as his body was becoming racked with aches and pains. And by that Friday he could no longer make house calls, being a victim of the nameless horror. By Saturday night he lay dying from the touch of The Thing. And he realized at last what was happening.

Oh but the horror named by James Lassiter as The Thing had a name. The Wilmington Journal in it's September 29, 1862 edition reported the death of Dr. James H Dickson on September 28th. The cause, a hemorrhagic disease. Perhaps Poe would today write of what struck Wilmington that year in a story called The Mask of the Yellow Death for it was that yellow fever inflicted nearly a thousand of the citizens of the city, killing more than three hundred of them. Including Dr. Dickson.

Last edited on Mon Oct 28th, 2013 04:53 pm by Hellcat



 Posted: Sun Oct 6th, 2013 11:59 pm
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For this next one I'm going to turn Arthur Myers' The Ghostly Register. The book is not really a ghost story book, it's broken down as more of investigations into locations that are supposed to be haunted, or were supposedly haunted.

In the late '60s a Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Cutler moved into a house in Gilsum, New Hampshire. Mr. Cutler had been a student at Keene State College in Keene, New Hampshire, which may have been important in what would happen. Almost as soon as the Cutler's moved into the house they discovered they weren't alone. They would hear heavy footsteps they could not explain, lights would turn on and off on their own, and objects would be moved for no apparent reason. Thinking their house might be haunted, they decided to have someone come in to investigate. From 1956 to 1966 one of the teachers at Keene State was Charles Hapgood, an anthropology teacher noted for his hypothesis on polar shift while teaching at Springfield College in Springfield, Massachusetts. Hapgood had also worked for ten years with the medium Elwood Babbitt. Babbitt lived in Massachusetts

Though it doesn't mention it within the book, Cutler may either have known of Hapgood as he may have been one of his former students or as an alumni of Keene State he may have had relations with the school since graduating. In any case the Cutlers asked Hapgood to come to their house to investigate for the possibility of a haunting and see if he could exorcise the spirit. Hapgood's method of investigation was through automatic writing. Now for those not familiar with automatic writing, the basic idea is that you hold pencil or pen to paper and let spirits guide your writing.

In his initial investigation Hapgood discovered the ghost was the ghost was named George and that he had been there for a hundred years. The ghost admit that he would sit in the kitchen or on the steps to the cellar or the second floor. And that he wanted to move on but couldn't. At this point Hapgood called Babbitt into the investigation. The medium revealed that George was the spirit of a young man and that he appeared to be dressed in a Civil War uniform. Together they determined that George was too self-centered to pass on. The ghost admitted to praying daily to cross over and that he had even done everything he should have to pass over. This lead to Hapgood trying a little bit of paranormal psychotherapy, suggesting that the ghost leave the house and try to help other's in Gilsum. It was reported that George may have followed this advice as the ghost never appeared again.

On checking of the history of the house it was discovered that during the Civil War two Georges did live in the house, a father and his son. The son is believed to have been a soldier in the war and Hapgood believed he may have died, possibly in battle, during the war.

Last edited on Sun Oct 27th, 2013 11:25 pm by Hellcat



 Posted: Mon Oct 28th, 2013 04:57 am
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This next story begins in 1908, some 43 years after the war ended. This one comes from Nancy Robert's Ghosts of the Carolinas.

1908 in Deadwood, South Dakota, Francis Moore published a book. Moore had been an officer in Federal army and had served on Folly Island during the siege of Charleston and the book appears to have at least dealt with some of the activity of the siege. But Moore was only the one to tell the following events, he did not take part in them.

From April 3rd to July 10, 1863 the 62nd Ohio Infantry had taken part in the occupation of Folly Island, including action during the Skirmish of Folly Island. In preparation for the fighting to come General Gilmore ordered that all black residents of Folly Island be removed to Port Royal. Among those supervising the move was one Lt. Yokum of the 62nd. Yokum went to the house of an old woman and child, possibly her granddaughter/grandson or great granddaughter/great grandson or possibly just some child under her care as well as watching out for the old woman themselvesself, trying to get her to leave. She refused to leave and Yokum was forced to sit and listen to her, believing that showing her a little kindness would convince her that the Federal forces really did have her safety at heart.

The woman mentioned that her family had been living on Folly Island for a long time, dating back to the early part of the previous century. Some time as a little girl the woman, who appeared close to a hundred, and her family had witnessed pirates come ashore and bury six treasure chests, which she claimed were filled with gold, silver, and jewels, between a pair of nearby oaks. With the chests in the hole the pirate captain proceeded to run one of his men through. The victim fell into the hole and the pirates quickly buried them and the treasure chests before leaving the area. It may have been just in time to for apparently as soon as there ship was out of sight a British man of war appeared on the horizon searching for pirates.

The story of a treasure naturally interested Yokum and he asked if it had ever been dug up. The old woman told him it never had as the family was too afraid of the ghost created by the pirate captain to guard the treasure. In fact no one dared go near the spot for that reason. After this Yokum managed to convince the old woman and child to board the boat. Who knows what he said to her to convince her to leave. Maybe it was that she just needed a little kindness. Maybe he didn't give her a choice. Or maybe she had been serving sentry over the spot and needed to pass on her knowledge to someone else so that they could then take up her role. Whatever the case Lt. Yokum succeeded in getting her to leave. And with her and the child safely out of the way Yokum returned to the 62nd Ohio's camp and related her story to his friend Lt. Hatcher.

It was just before the witching hour, which we all know is when the creatures of the night are said to come out, when Yokum and Hatcher stole from their camp and returned to the old black woman's cabin, shovels in hand to unearth the long buried ill gotten booty. There was no breeze in the air to cool the evening. So perhaps it should have been a bit strange that the tops of the to oaks began to rustle as the treasure hunters approached. But then thoughts of gold and silver and jewels undoubtedly were all that occupied their minds.

Find a spot directly between the two oaks the men began t dig. There was a sudden flash of lightning, causing them to look up. Yokum searched for signs of an impending summer thunderstorm but to hi surprise the lightning was not accompanied by thunder of any kind. It was Hatcher who noted the change in the trees, their tops were now being buffeted as if by a strong wind though there is no mention of if either man could feel one. Most likely not as the men did not feel a breeze earlier when the tree tops were merely rustling.

The men returned to their digging. This time they did feel a wind as it blew sand against their faces and shirtless bodies. Perhaps it was they were willing to tolerate the blowing sand as it offered some relief from the heat of the night. But as they continued to dig the noiseless lightning became a constant companion, at times illuminating the darkness so that they could see each other as if it were daylight. And following one particularly long flash the two men suddenly realized they were no longer alone.

There, beside them was a figure dressed clearly like a pirate from days gone by. Neither man waited for anything to be said or even for a ghostly cackle or scream. They quickly fled the site and returned to the 62nd's camp. Once their they agreed to never tell another sole what they saw. The next day the 62nd went into action on Morris Island. In the days t come the regiment would take part in the infamous assault on Fort Wagner. Both men would be decorated for bravery. But not once during the war or in the years following it did either man relate the story of what happened. It wasn't until years after Hatcher had passed away that Yokum would relate the tale to his friend, Francis Moore.

Now for those saying "but the woman couldn't have been alive during the age of piracy" here is something to think about. Even though the golden age of piracy ended around the 1730s, the US would be dealing with coastal pirates well into the 19th century. So it would be possible for someone born prior to the Revolution and in their 90s or early 100s might still have witnessed pirates burying treasure.

But did Yokum and Hatcher really see the ghost of a the long dead pirate or did they find his skeleton wrapped in the tatters of it's 18th century clothing. And if they did see a ghost, is the treasure still there to be found? Surely by now that old cabin and one or both of the oaks gone. After all the city of Folly Beach is located of the island. Is it possible the treasure was dug up by some city developer long ago. Or has the treasure some home managed to remain buried, waiting for a modern treasure hunter with modern equipment to come along and find it?



 Posted: Mon Oct 28th, 2013 08:26 pm
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Well I'm guessing this thread is in line with the soldiers themselves. Michael Sanders in his Strange Tales of the Civil War mentions that the telling of tall tales and ghost stories was among the past times of the soldiers during the Siege of Petersburg. Likely like gambling and singing the telling of tall tales and ghosts stories was one of the past times of the soldiers throughout the war, not just during Petersburg. And this next one, coming from Sanders' book, actually was apparently told by one of the officers of 116th Pennsylvania.

1st Lt. Eugene Brady had been listening to the stories of George Halpin during his time with the British Army in India and decided to counter with a ghost story of his own. It would happen that around the time of the Battle of Chancellorsville there was an old woman living in Hockendaque (likely an old spelling for Hokendauqua, Pa), a villageon Pennsylvania's Lehigh River, whose son was serving in the Eleventh Corps. On May 3rd the woman crossed the river to Catasauqua in order to see a pastor there.

The woman told the pastor that her son John was home and wandering the village but would not talk to her. He had arrived home the not before, completely unexpected. The woman was to shocked at his appearance that she did not immediately go to him and he did not offer to come to her either. Instead he merely went up to the next floor. Coming to her senses the woman tried going to her son, but he was no where to be scene. Instead she saw one of the upstairs windows was open and believed that he had climbed down the trellis outside. She expected he would, at some point that evening, come back to the house but he never did.

The earlier that day she had gone looking for her son and found him walking the streets of the village. She tried running to him but he turned a corner and vanished. She reached the corner and could not see hide nor hair of him. She believed he had gone into one of the houses, but could not tell which one it was. Believing her son was angry with her for some reason she asked the pastor if he would return to Hockendaque with her and try to talk with John.

Having pity for the poor woman the pastor agreed to do what he could. He looked everywhere in the village, but could not find John anywhere. And questioning the residents of Hockendaque revealed that the old woman was the only one who had seen the young man. It was not until May 5th that they learned just what it was that she had been seeing. On that day a letter came announcing that John had been killed on the night of May 2nd, at exactly the same time his mother saw him come in through the door.

Could it be that John was killed at around Jackson was shot? Certainly he was among the soldiers who had to face Jackson's flanking attack on May 2nd.



 Posted: Tue Oct 29th, 2013 05:14 am
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These next two come from Lighthouse Ghosts & Carolina Costal Legends by Norma Elizabeth and Bruce Roberts.

We begin at Fort Macon. Now as some of you may already know in the early part of 1862 Ambrose Burnside launched his North Carolina Expedition. Put in command of the expedition by McClellan, the North Carolina Expedition was probably the high point of Burnside's military career for 1862. The expedition would see Burnside's forces take Roanoke Island, Elizabeth City, and New Bern all by mid-March. Then late in march he began the siege of Fort Macon which would last from March 23rd to April 26th before the fort fell to Federal hands.

Today Fort Macon is a state park which normally draws visitors into the millions. Though if you ask some of the visitors and staff, Fort Macon is haunted and the spirit doing the haunting is a Confederate soldier named Benjamin Combs. Now apparently according to historical records Combs was killed by shrapnel in his back, suffering for several hours before finally succumbing to his wounds early in the war. Just how early the book does not actually say, only that it was during the early days of the war. This could mean some time in 1861, perhaps during a live fire training drill gone wrong, or, as I suspect, during the siege of the fort. Now I have looked on CWSS and discovered five Ben Combs serving in the Confederate army there, one with an unlisted Maryland unit, one with the Virginia Cavalry unit Harness' Independent Company, one with the 2nd Arkansas Mounted Rifles, one with the 35th Arkansas Infantry, and the last one with Company F of the 1st North Carolina Artillery. The last one would seem the most likely though I can't find evidence Co. F was at Fort Macon during the siege or before. I do find that the company was captured at Fort Fisher, which would fall later in the war.

No matter what unit Combs belonged to, his ghost has been said to be responsible for locking one park ranger out of their office. The ghost is also said to turn lights off and on, slam doors, and do other things that aren't considered harmful or dangerous but more playful little pranks. When this happens all the staff has to do is tell Ben to knock it off and the pranks stop for a while. As for visitors, their more likely to actually see the ghost in some for or other. Reenactors who have spent the night at the fort have reported seeing someone or something hanging around their equipment. Perhaps as they are re-enactors dressed in period clothing and carrying period equipment the ghost believes they are fellow Confederate soldiers returning to the fort.

From Fort Macon we travel south to mouth of the Cape Fear River and Fort Fisher. In January of 1865 Federal forces launched the 2nd Battle of Fort Fisher. Among the Confederates present at the fort was Major General William H.C. Whiting, commander of the District of Cape Fear. Upon arriving at Fisher prior to the battle Whiting is to have told the commander of Fisher's Garrison, one Colonel William Lamb, "Lamb my boy, I have come to share your fate. You and your garrison are to be sacrificed" Whiting would be wounded in the battle and by 10 PM on January 15 would be forced to surrender his command. Taken prisoner, the general would die on March 10th of dysentery while on Governor's Island in NYC.

It was just a few years after the war that the story of the haunting of the grounds of Fort Fisher would first be reported. And it would be appropriate that it was Confederate veterans of the 2nd Battle of Fort Fisher who would be the first witnesses. Near to dusk as the men were conducting their pilgrimage to the site where they and their friends had shed their blood, sweat, and tears all those years before the men discovered another being at the remains of the old fort with them. They believed at first it was another veteran, this one dressed in his old uniform, also making a pilgrimage to the site of he fort. The figure mounted the gun emplacement near to the Wilmington road and they realized not only was this man wearing the uniform of the Confederate Army but he also wore the stars of a general. The group suddenly realized that they recognized him as the man they had called "Little Billy" It was, as you already know, none other than General Whiting. The men moved to welcome the general back only to have him suddenly vanish before their eyes. As they stood in wonder of what had just happened one of the veterans suddenly realized that the spot they had just seen the figure in was the very spot where General Whiting had been wounded.

This would not be the last time the ghost of General Whiting would be seen. Indeed today some still claim to see Whiting's ghost. A column today marks the center of the old fort. Visitors to the fort claim that if you wait long enough around dusk you will see General Whiting appear at this spot before moving off to a nearby hill. At a distance you can tell the figure is an officer with generals stars. He reaches the low hill and appears to be scanning the horizon, perhaps seeing the now long gone Federal naval force that took part in his last battle or perhaps searching for blockade runners, before he vanishes.



 Posted: Wed Oct 30th, 2013 12:06 am
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Until now I've been doing stories from books. Now I'm going to turn to a DVD and the TV series Unsolved Mysteries. These come from the fourth disc of the Unsolved Mysteries: Ghosts DVD set.

Of course we all know about Gettysburg. Those of us from the US had to learn about it in school for years. And while I can't say that those of us who aren't from the US learned about it in school, I would say that those joining this forum have studied the American Civil War at least a little and are familiar with. And certainly there are those of us who have heard that the battlefield is haunted. In fact Darryl graced us with a story from his first trip to Gettysburg.

It's not been unheard of for re-enactors to have encounters on the battlefield. One such re-enactor was a man named Ray Hock. Hock and another re-enactor were taking a break from a Gettysburg re-enactment when they were approached by what appeared to be another re-enactor. The man was dressed in period outfit and gear, naturally not uncommon for re-enactors. But this man's clothing and gear looked even more period accurate than both men were used to. It looked to Hock like the guy wasn't wearing and carrying reproduction uniform and equipment but rather the period original stuff. Hock says this man smelled heavily of sulfur and looked tired. The figure approached the two men, asking them if it was a hard day. He then proceeded to give each man what appeared to be authentic live cartridges even though live rounds are banned on the battlefield today. The men looked at the rounds in their hands and when they looked up the man was gone. There was no sign of him anywhere, as if he'd vanished into thin air. Hock took the cartridges to a university for examination and says they determined that the cartridges, right down to the minie ball and powder inside, were authentic to the Civil War.

The story then moves on to the hunt for the wounded during the battle. Search parties went out each night looking for the day's wounded and host Robert Stack says that some of the searchers may still be carrying on their duties to this day. In '93 a group of friends who had been witness to the 130th anniversary re-enactment were out walking the battlefield at night along a creek called Bloody Run. Richard Knapp, one of the re-enactors and a member of the group, and his wife discovered the body of a man, which Knapp describes as more of a hazy mist. The figure looked to be in pain, probably a wounded soldier. His brother David would go with a group to an area called the Slaughter Pen. David says he could hear cannon shots and drumrolls and men marching, and one member of his group saw a ghostly figure. All this activity caused David to tell the group it was time for them to leave.

The story then ends with the surgeons of Gettysburg and the field hospital at Pennsylvania Hall. Today Pennsylvania Hall serves as the central administrative building for Gettysburg College, so it is little wonder that the story ends with a pair of school administrators. They boarded the elevator close to midnight one night preparing to leave the school after work years ago. They were the last ones in the building that day. One of them pressed the button for the ground floor, but instead they found themselves going to the basement. Their thoughts at this point were that there was someone else in the building, in the basement, who had called for the elevator and it was going there instead of letting them off on the 1st floor. But when the door opened they found themselves transported to another time as they witnessed the surgeons of a hundred years before hard at work tending to the wounded. The to administrators claimed they could smell the stench that went along with the field hospital. They were only able to escape their ordeal only after one of the orderlies beseechingly turned to them. Stack reveals that they have never submitted to a formal interview, but the night of there ordeal they did tell the story to a campus security officer, a Timon Linn who does say that the two were obviously frightenedby something. Linn says he doesn't himself believe in ghosts but he does believe the administrators saw something because they are credible people.



 Posted: Wed Oct 30th, 2013 08:55 pm
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Comets. For centuries these heavenly bodies were viewed as the harbingers of death. Bringers of doom and destruction. In early 1861 there was at least on comet spotted in the skies over DC. Both Christopher Coleman in Ghosts and Haunts of the Civil War and Michael Sanders in Strange Tales of the Civil War tell the story of Oola an the War Comet.

Ghosts and Haunts of the Civil War says that Oola was an ancient black woman, the slave of the Woodward family. She was tall with wrinkled features and hawk-like eyes. The black community at large were afraid of her, claiming she the evil eye and was a conjurer of spells. She was also the teller of fortunes and the children of the neighborhood would have their fortunes told by Oola. One day she told the Taft children that the comet in the sky was a fiery sword with it's handle pointed to the North and the point pointed towards the South. It was predicting, according to Oola, a war between the North and the South in which the North would take this "sword" and cut out the heart of the South. But it was not without it's consequences for if Lincoln took the sword then he would perish by it.

The Tafts were playmates with Willie and Tad Lincoln and Julia Taft (later Julia Taft Bayne, author of Tad Lincoln's Father) told Tad Oola's prophecy. Now Ghost and Haunts of the Civil War says that Tad told his father about the prophecy and Lincoln laughed at it. But that he did take interest in it and could be spotted a few nights later staring up at the comet. Strange Tales of the Civil War takes the conversation between father and son a little differently. Here Tad tells both his parents about Oola's prophecy and that it was his mother who laughed at the prophecy but Lincoln was interested by it. When Tad asked if he thought that was what she had meant Lincoln supposedly said he hoped it wouldn't come to that.

This comet was supposedly seen in April 1861. Of course we all know what happened that month and in the years to come. And we know that the war ultimately cost Lincoln his life. Did Oola actually see Lincoln's death or was it just a coincidence?



 Posted: Thu Oct 31st, 2013 06:35 pm
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Well gonna return to Pennsylvania Hall. This time this is coming from Angus Konstam's Civil War Ghost Stories.

Now in the 30th post I mentioned that during the Battle of Gettysburg Pennsylvania Hall served as a field hospital. I also mentioned what happened to the two school administrators, which Konstam reveals were two men who did not believe in ghosts before that night. Tour-guide Mark Nesbitt reveals that at the time of the books writing both men were still working in the building but never took the elevator again. Konstam says that both men are reluctant to submit to any formal interviews as they know they will not be believed and would even be seen as being a little crazy for telling their story and revealing their identities.

But their incident hasn't been the only one at Pennsylvania Hall. Staff and students alike have reported seeing the outlines of people in the cupola. Whenever anyone would try to investigate they would find no one there. Some of these witnesses have reported that the figures appear to be Confederate soldiers, which has led to some claiming the building, or at least the upper portion of it, is haunted by soldiers from the Army of Northern Virginia. With what the administrators witnessed in the basement, perhaps it's likely we can say the entire building is haunted by soldiers of the Army of Northern Virginia. That is if you believe in ghosts.



 Posted: Fri Nov 1st, 2013 05:01 am
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HAPPY HALLOWEEN




Well it's Halloween once again, and will probably be November 1st when I finish this post. This will be the last ghost story I tell this year, maybe I'll tell some more next year. My next post in this thread is going to be a bibliography of my sources.

Back in 2010 I did a number of stories concerning Lincoln, in fact I've done at least one this year concerning him. How about I go a different route to close this on out. Let's go to Fort Monroe. And like 2010 I'm going to look to Christopher Coleman's Ghosts and Haunts of the Civil War to finish out this years stories as well as using Angus Konstam's Civil War Ghost Stories. in place of Nancy Roberts'Civil War Ghost Stories and Legends.

As many of you know Fort Monroe probably holds the distinction of being the only fort to have served as a prison for a president. At the end of the war and after a man hunt, Jefferson Davis was imprisoned in Fort Monroe without even a trial of any kind. Coleman suggests that the radical Republican's were actually afraid to try him for treason because they were afraid he'd get a fair trial and be proved innocent. This is something we have an open discussion on an if you would like to discuss it please go here. Konstam does point out that he was indicted on charges of treason in May 1866 even though he'd already been a prisoner in the fort for a year at that point, again pointing out he was never brought to trial.

Davis would be placed in Casemate No. 2 where he would be placed, hands and feet, in shackles which would result in his health beginning to decline. His wife, Varina, would constantly fight for his freedom and for improved living conditions for him. It may have been this coupled with the doctors concern for his health, that lead to his being moved to different quarters which would allow family to stay with him. Finally in 1867 he was released.

But did Davis and Varina truly leave Fort Monroe. It's true we know what happened to Davis and his wife after his release, but some times we never truly leave places that may have had some kind of important link to us in life. And this may be true of the Davis'.

Of the two Varina is the most commonly associated to haunt Fort Monroe. Varina stayed in the quarters opposite Casemate No. 2 while Davis was incarcerated there. The second floor window to her room is the only one directly opposite of Davis' cell. Witnesses have claimed to have seen the figure of a grown woman and a little girl standing at the window, staring out it. If approached the figures will vanish. This window itself is a bit perculiar as it will vibrate. According The vibration starts around 4 PM and continues on into the night. And the sound can be loud enough to drown out any TV in the room. Army personnel have tried to stop this strange vibration, but apparently it's a bit like the stories of bloodstains in other places where the bloodstain can't seem to be removed no matter what is tried.

And if Varina and apparently their daughter Winnie appears at Fort Monroe, what of Davis himself. Though not witnessed as often as his wife, Davis has been witnessed as well. Konstam says that Davis is rarely witnessed in either of the locations of the fort where he was imprisoned, though he does reveal that Both Davis and Varina have been spotted in Casemate No 2, she seated and he on his knees in front of her, his head cradled in her lap.

It is more common to see Davis's ghost wandering the ramparts of the fort. Whether or not he was allowed to go to the ramparts in his life time, his ghost does so today. It appears to walk past the area of the flagstaff. Coleman speculates that the ghost's appearance here is more a desire from his time in Casemate No 2, a desire for freedom that may have somehow manifested itself. But Davis was eventually liberated, so was it possible that Davis did actually get to walk the ramparts before leaving in 1867? Or did he perhaps visit Fort Monroe at some point prior to the war, perhaps when he was Secretary of War.

Last edited on Fri Nov 1st, 2013 05:02 am by Hellcat



 Posted: Fri Nov 1st, 2013 06:56 pm
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Well as promised this post will be a bibliography of the sources used this year, not me posting another ghost story. or those who feel like posting ghost stories they've read or scene, or for those who wish to share there personal experiences, please feel free to do so.

For those interested in further reading or watching further, or just to get how these stories originally appeared, try checking out


Books
  • Coleman, Christopher K. Ghosts and Haunts of the Civil War. NY: Barnes & Noble Books. 2003 (First printing 1999)
  • Elizabeth, Norma and Bruce Roberts. Lighthouse Ghosts & Carolina Coastal Legends. Morehead City, NC: Lighthouse Publications 2004
  • Konstam, Angus. Civil War Ghost Stories. San Diego, Ca: Thunder Bay Press. 2005
  • Myers, Arthur. The Ghostly Register. Chicago, Illinois: Contemporary Books, Inc. 1986
  • Reevy, Tony. Ghost Train! American Railroad Ghost Legends. Lynchburg, Va: TLC Publishing, Inc. 1998 (Sixth printing 2002)
  • Roberts, Nancy. Ghosts of the Carolinas. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press 1967 (First Printing 1962)
  • Sanders, Michael. Strange Tales of the Civil War. Hippenburg, Pa: Burd Street Press. 2001
  • Walser, Richard. North Carolina Legends. Raleigh NC: Historical Publications Section, North Carolina Division of Archives and History. 1980 (Twentieth printing 2007)


Video
  • Unsolved Myseries. Eisode "Gettysburg Ghosts." Exec. Prod. Terry Dunn Meurer and John Cosgrove. Host Robert Stack. 1996. DVD (DVD collection Unsolved Mysteries: Ghosts. Cosgrove/Meurer Productions, Inc. 2004)

Last edited on Thu Nov 7th, 2013 06:10 pm by Hellcat



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