Civil War Interactive Discussion Board Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register


Civil War "Buffs" - Other Civil War Talk - Civil War Talk - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
 Moderated by: javal1 Page:    1  2  3  Next Page Last Page  
 New Topic   Reply   Printer Friendly 
 Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Sun Sep 25th, 2005 01:11 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
1st Post
george franks
Member
 

Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: Bethesda, Maryland USA
Posts: 37
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I am curious about the ages of Civil War buffs, historians, enactors, living historians, interpretors, etc.

I was born in 1958.  I grew up watching westerns, disney historical shows and movies, and the few Civil War shows like the GRAY GHOST, The Rebel and even (sort of.)..RIN TIN TIN.  In 1961 I saw LIFE magazine do a series on the Centennial. And all the stores carried toy Kepis (I had several), Kadet Muskets, Marx toy guns and CSA flags and more.

It all gelled for me when my parents took me to see Gettysburg for the first time in July 1963 days after the 100th of the battle.  The park was pristine, packed. I remember vendors on the sides of the road selling authetic relics. I climbed on every cannon I saw.  I loved the ground, the monuments, the museums, etc.  I was HOOKED.

I went on to visit many other battlefields over the next several years. And was fortunate enough to serve as a drummer boy with an N-SSA unit (even though my father was not a member).  Pretty amazing looking back. I saved my pennies to buy relics, repro gear, books, toy soldiers. You name it.

Interested to see about others - both older and younger than me.  I have to admit, I have never met a WWII or Korea combat veteran who was interested in the Civil War.  But I am sure there were and are some...

 



 Posted: Sun Sep 25th, 2005 02:02 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
2nd Post
a20thmainemiss
Member


Joined: Mon Sep 12th, 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 5
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

i dunno, maybe you should look on the poll about that. it's in the reenacting section.:)



 Posted: Sun Sep 25th, 2005 02:19 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
3rd Post
kj3553
Born in the wrong century


Joined: Tue Sep 6th, 2005
Location: Toledo, Ohio USA
Posts: 169
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I was born in '53, and remember all those programs you mentioned, especially Rin Tin Tin. :D My interest in the Civil War grew out of my mother's love of history. Whenever we took a family vacation, we'd camp somewhere near a body of water so my Dad could go fishing, and Mom could take my sister and I to any historical sites that were within driving distance. The first Civil War site I was taken to (but of which I have no recollection, as I was 3 years old), was Chickamauga. Over the years we visited just about every major and many minor battle sites, but I knew I was finally learning something when I no longer had to ask my mother, "Which side won this battle?"

The event that really turned the corner for me was the movie Gettysburg, when my interest went from casual to intense. My Dad had passed away, and I thought it would be fun for Mom and I to visit Gettysburg again. So we took a long weekend and drove there. That weekend, after touring the battlefield, we went downtown to see the Gettysburg movie which was playing there. The rest, as they say, is history...

Oh, and I know several WW2 and Korean War vets who are interested in the Civil War and are members of the CWRT I belong to.

~KJ



 Posted: Mon Sep 26th, 2005 08:23 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
4th Post
GenHood
Member


Joined: Mon Sep 5th, 2005
Location: Urbana, Illinois USA
Posts: 32
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I was born in 1965, and when I was eight our pastor took the Sunday School kids to Springfield, IL to see all the Lincoln sites (his home, the Old State Capitol, his law office, and the Lincoln Tomb where all but one of the Lincoln family rests).   We also went to the Lincoln cabin in Petersburg, IL where I purchased a few postcards and a small Rebel Battle Flag.   Why?  Something about that flag interested me, so when I returned to school on Monday I checked out a big, red clothbound book on the Civil War.  It had lots of illustrations of the battles, generals, soldiers, etc.  I think I eventually checked out every Civil War book in our school library.  I later gave my first oral book report on Robert E. Lee that same school year. My interest waned a little through my teens and 20's, but when I received "The Killer Angels" as a gift the same summer we went to Gettysburg, it roared back with a vengeance.   I always make it a point to check on ANYTHING related to the war whenever and wherever I travel, even if it's a small monument in a tiny county courthouse yard, and add it to my collection of visited sites, along with a photo.  Although not a participant, I enjoy attending re-enactments and living history events, and have visited battlefields big and small, and look forward to seeing and experiencing even more.



 Posted: Tue Sep 27th, 2005 02:36 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
5th Post
Albert Sailhorst
Member


Joined: Mon Sep 12th, 2005
Location: Aledo, Illinois USA
Posts: 555
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I was born in the suburbs of Chicago....my father, grandfather and all before us came from Tennessee/NorthCarolina.....I was the first born up north. When I was 6 years old, my dad took us on vacation to Tennessee and Atlanta. The night before we left, he told me of the Great Civil War....all about the soldiers, battles, horses and cannons. As a 6 year old kid, I couldn't wait to visit those battlefields.

By the time I was in my teens, I read every book I could get my hands on about Gen. Forrest, Shiloh, Ft. Pillow and the war in general (all of Buce Catton's books). As I got older still, I visited Shiloh, Ft. Pillow, Parker's Crossroads, Corinth, Gettysburg, Pea Ridge....In college, I read more Civil War books than books for my major!

This past year, I started reenacting (I am 40 now, so I figure I had 34 years to read about the war, now it is time to experience it!). No matter how old I get or how much I learn, I can never know enough or find out enough.....It's a hobby....a way of life...it's remembering my past....it's teaching my son by my example and passion for the subject.....

 

Albert Sailhorst, Cannoneer, Scott's Tennessee Battery



 Posted: Tue Sep 27th, 2005 03:36 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
6th Post
Boots
Member


Joined: Thu Sep 8th, 2005
Location:  
Posts: 16
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

man, at 34, i feel like i'm just a kid ~

grew up lost in books. developed a fascination for the Lincoln conspiracy when i was a teenager (acurally read all the trial transcripts in my sophomore year in college ~ they're great reading if anyone hasn't seen them).

that lead to a curiosity about the war's impact on civilians and the younger generation who got involved late (the kids who went to war at 14).

i'm not all that saavy about tactics, etc. nor am i particularly inerested in the details of such things (though i like to listen and learn). but i do find the effects of the war on the people who lived through it to be extraordinary.

despite its historical inaccuracies, i think the movie <i>Glory</i> gave a huge boost to my passion for the era at a time when i was just beginning to form an attachment to it, so i hold it dear.

: D



 Posted: Sat Oct 1st, 2005 05:51 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
7th Post
kj3553
Born in the wrong century


Joined: Tue Sep 6th, 2005
Location: Toledo, Ohio USA
Posts: 169
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I still love Glory. I think it's one of the best Civil War movies ever made. One thing that sticks out in my mind, though, is from a review I read on the movie when it came out. The author, who should have stuck to reviewing instead of thinking he knew anything about history, remarked that Matthew Broderick was too young to be playing the colonel of a regiment. If that person had even bothered to investigate before writing, he would have found out that the real Robert G. Shaw at the time he was commanding the 54th Mass. was actually younger than Broderick was when he portrayed Shaw.

~KJ



 Posted: Sat Oct 1st, 2005 06:04 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
8th Post
Boots
Member


Joined: Thu Sep 8th, 2005
Location:  
Posts: 16
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

that's so true, kj ~ i always marvel at how young shaw was and i think even though broderick was actually older, he has the right youthful quality to portray that.

and actually, matthew broderick is just an all-around good match for shaw. other than the hairline, their features are strikingly similar.

: D




 Posted: Sun Oct 2nd, 2005 05:36 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
9th Post
Harry
Member


Joined: Sat Oct 1st, 2005
Location: Key West, Florida USA
Posts: 27
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I was born in 1953 and remember all those television programs as well. I've always had an interest in history in general and military history in particular. I grew up out west in Arizona. My great-granddad was a cav soldier serving with Gen. Miles in Arizona during the Indian Wars and was in the party that "escorted" Geronimo out of Arizona. My great-granddad served at Fort Huachuca and nearly 100 years later, I followed in his footsteps there for my tour of duty.

I now work for the Florida Park Service at Fort Taylor, Fl. We host a reenactment every Feb and so it just seemed natural to don the Federal blue and man the 10-inch Rodman seacoast cannon we have set up in our casemate. Our unit is one of the few in the nation to do heavy artillery drill. Our unit also has a 3-inch ordnance rifle w/limber that we take to reenactments around the state.

Harry



 Posted: Mon Oct 3rd, 2005 05:22 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
10th Post
MAubrecht
Member


Joined: Wed Sep 7th, 2005
Location: Fredericksburg, Virginia USA
Posts: 143
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

In 1978, I was a scrawny six year-old kid with only two real interests in the world; GI Joe and the Pittsburgh Steelers. Unlike today, the 70's was a much simpler time, and playing army or sports in my backyard was all that really mattered. Family time was also an important part of my childhood and vacations were eagerly anticipated in the Aubrecht house. Over the years, we had driven or flown to several destinations including Disneyworld, Niagara Falls, and Sea World. All of them were magical, but none as special as the place we visited in 1978.

That was the summer my family traveled to the National Military Park at Gettysburg. I remember it like it was yesterday and how funny the name "Gettysburg" sounded to me at the time. I also recall how I had absolutely no idea what was there. Did it have an amusement park, or a beach, or maybe some natural wonder, or a water park? Those were the types of getaways I was used to. "Nope." my mother said, "Don't worry. I think you'll like it." For some reason, both my mother and father kept the main attraction a surprise and I vividly recall asking them repeatedly on the drive there, where were we going and what we would see.

After what seemed like days, we finally arrived at this little tourist town in Pennsylvania greeted by miles of wooden rail fences and wheat fields. "What is this?" I asked myself, "Some kind of farm?" Pulling into the town, I can still picture all of the flags (both Union and Confederate) that adorned the doorways of virtually every store and hotel in sight. I also remember seeing what I thought were blue and gray cowboys painted on the signs for several museums and attractions. "Whatever took place here," I told myself, "it happened a long time ago."

As we checked in, my parents gave me a very brief introduction on where we were and why we were there. Hearing the key word "war," my mind began to race as I tried to take it all in. A Civil War? Americans fighting Americans? Soldiers? Slaves? Instantly a mass of both familiar and foreign terms sparked my interest. As we departed the hotel and began to sightsee, I found myself becoming more and more excited about where we were and what I was about to experience. I recall seeing real cannons for the first time and lots of big gray statues and monuments. I remember feeling so small while looking up at these giant bearded guys on horses that were wielding guns and swords. Very cool. Very cool indeed!

The battlefield itself was a bit of a bore initially as endless rock outcroppings and miles of grassy fields failed to capture the imagination of this six year-old boy. On the other hand, the many museums and other attractions we later visited really caught my eye. I clearly remember every sight we saw including the Wax Museum, Robert E. Lee's Headquarters, Jenny Wade's House, the Gettysburg Cyclorama, and of course the National Cemetery where miles and miles of tombstones mark the graves of our fallen brothers in arms. After attending every show and spectacle available, the battlefield took on a whole new meaning and I vividly recall our second tour out to hallowed locations like Seminary Ridge, Little Round Top, High Water Mark, the site of Pickett's Charge and Devil's Den.

I remember ducking down behind the stone walls and pretending it was July of 1863. Often I would force my little sister to play the role of the "loser" in that particular melee and I must have "shot" her dead a thousand times. (Sorry Melissa.)

As our vacation progressed, the tales of these men and the three-day battle in which they participated captivated me like nothing had before, or has since. I began to understand the impact of the Civil War and respected the North's battle to preserve the Union, as well as the South's fight for state's rights. Initially, I struggled to find the "bad guy" in all of this. After all, when I played army at home it was always me, the American, fighting any number of our previous enemies whether the Germans or Japanese or Russians. This "civil" war however was very different and even I could not bring myself to judge either the blue or the gray. Ultimately, neither side were "true enemies" and I felt that both were acting on behalf of their country and God.

Over the next few days, I spent every waking minute possible soaking up as much knowledge as I could on the War Between the States. I also soaked up a ton of souvenirs and went home loaded down with a kepi hat, musket pistol, books, toy soldiers, postcards, maps and even a bunch of View Master discs (remember those) that featured the photography of Matthew Brady. In retrospect, Mom and Dad definitely shelled out some cash on that trip. The following year we returned again and I don't think I ever anticipated a family vacation as much as that one. By then I was a seasoned seven year-old Civil War Buff who had even memorized the Gettysburg Address. "Four score and seven years ago…" This time, I understood exactly where we were and the sacrifice of the men President Lincoln honored in that speech.

What had started off as a simple family vacation changed my life forever as Gettysburg left an indefinable impression on me that remains to this very day. Now I live in Fredericksburg, Virginia and the same magic that I experienced in the north now surrounds me in the south. Just as I cannot forget this childhood experience, I cannot forget the men who fought and died so that America could be reborn in unity.

God Bless every Billy Yank and Johnny Reb who fell on the fields of battle all across America and God Bless my parents who introduced me to them all.



 Posted: Thu Nov 3rd, 2005 12:39 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
11th Post
TheStratton4
Member


Joined: Wed Nov 2nd, 2005
Location: Pennington, New Jersey USA
Posts: 2
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Mid-forties here.  Didn't get hooked until I was in very early twenties.  Bruce Catton -I mentioned in another post, is what did it for me intellectually.  The rest of it was like falling in love in alot of ways, a passionate obsession.  

I think I connected the dots very early to Walt Whitman.  Experiencing his prose and poetry gave me an emotional connection to the period that has endured to this day.  For me, it is always a journey to touch- in some meaningful way -the people of those times.  It is to know who they were, what they thought and suffered, and to appreciate their sacrifice.  All my efforts are ultimately to come closer to this goal. 

Laurie

 



 Posted: Thu Nov 3rd, 2005 03:51 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
12th Post
Sarladaise
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 6th, 2005
Location: Sarlat, France
Posts: 9
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I was born in Austria in '50 and apart from hearing about the American Civil War in history class at school my interest was first kindled reading "Gone with the Wind" (in German) during my teens but books about the American Civil War are hard to come by in Austria and my interest was only revived after moving to the US in the '80s, visiting different battlefields and reading James McPherson's "Battle Cry of Freedom". But, like KJ,  it was after seeing the movie "Gettysburg"  that I became a real Civil War Buff. In the meantime, we have left the US and moved to France but my interest is as keen as ever and we go back to the US often so I can visit and re-visit battlefields and stock up on CW books. Sadly, none of my friends here share my interest and remarks like "won any battles lately?" are common.... Fortunately, there is the Internet!

 



 Posted: Fri Nov 4th, 2005 01:16 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
13th Post
anv57regnc
Member


Joined: Thu Nov 3rd, 2005
Location: Baltimore, Maryland USA
Posts: 10
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I was born in Oct 1971 in Baltimore, MD. And when I was a kid, my grandma lived in Va, and was a history buff. Me I would have rather watched Star Trek reruns then. But as she would take me to places like Bull Run, and Gettysburg I started to also love the history. By the time I was 11, I wanted to reenact, but cost and the fact that I was to young to fight keep me away. I did not want to beat a drum. Well she got sick, and the trips were less and less. My teen years hit, and history was the last thing on my mind. So for many years I really did not think about it. Got married, and all the normal things you do. But about 7 years ago my grandma died, and I went on a trip around to the places in VA that she use to take me too. But my wife got me a use copy of Gettysburg from a videostore that was going out of business. Well I poped it in one afternoon, and started to really really miss Gettysburg the town. The very next weekend I took a trip there and refell in love with the town. The 2nd time there about a month or so later I walked in to a Yankee camp out my the PA monument. And just like when I was a kid, I got the bug to reenact. And the rest goes, I found a unit, joined. Did that for a while but found out that I had all of these family members who fought for NC, and I really wanted to do a NC impression. So I started a unit, the 57th North Carolina Co A, based on one of my family members units. Thats been over 3 years ago. We are still going strong. I still live in Baltimore, but I take a trip to Gettysburg 3 or 4 times a month. Just for lunch, or shopping for new gear, or just to go flagging at the NC monument. Yes it is a 1 and a half hour trip one way but I love that place so much that it feels like home to me.



 Posted: Sat Nov 12th, 2005 12:38 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
14th Post
Bill
Member
 

Joined: Sat Nov 12th, 2005
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 14
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Where as much as when.

For me it all began, back in 1962. At the time I was  trying to balance an 5 year Apprenticeship, and its encumberant day school, with further studies at night. Our local library was my study den as well as my peace and quiet.

Walking out one night I noticed a display set up by the American-Australia League. One of the books which I can still see now propped up on its display stand, resplendent in its white dust cover, even amongst the other books on display, caught my eye.

'A Stillness at Appomattox by Bruce Catton'

And that was the begining.....

Regards

Bill



 Posted: Tue Nov 15th, 2005 07:55 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
15th Post
Hellcat
Root Beer Lover


Joined: Tue Nov 15th, 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 890
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Born December 1974, a little over a week before Christmas. So I'm in my early thirties. My mother's told me that I've been intrested in the war since I was real little though to be honest it wasn't until I was around 11 that I can remember getting intrested. So I guess I'll have to take her word for it.

Let's see, places I've visited. Well, I've been told that when I was real young we visited Appomatox and Durham Station, though my parents did pick up Catton's A Stillness at Appomatox there so I have that as proof (photos would personally be better since they could claim to have bought it there and actually purchased it at some bookstore somewhere else). I do know of four places for certain I've been. Fort Morgan, Berkeley Plantation, Petersburg, and Fredricksburg.

Fort Morgan I don't remember to well. All I really remember is an anchor and some masonry. That probably due to the fact that we were on vaction to the Gulf Shores area of Albama at the time and on that same day we either visited the USS Alabama or an aquarium in addition to visiting the fort. Maybe all three in one day. The Alabama and the Drum really left a big impression as did walking over a pool of lemon sharks and seeing a dolphin show on me when I was about seven or eight.

Berkeley Plantation and Petersburg were both part of another vacation when I was 11, the beginning and the end. What I remember the most about Berkeley Plantation was the gardens cause we really spent a lot of time out there. But there was a place in the main building itself where you could see where a cannonball was lodged into the building during the war. And you could visit the spot where Taps is supposed to have been written. But Petersburg sticks out even more. It was the last day of our vaction and as we were getting ready to leave the hotel I hit my head on the bathroom wall. Don't even remember what I did that caused it, wheter I slipped on a wet floor, got in a shoving match with one of my sisters, or tripped over something. At anyrate, I had a serious goose egg and we thought at first that it was even worse. So I kinda milked things a little. We probably would have stopped anyway, but since I was "injured" we stopped. I can remember seeing where there had been railroad mortars near the visitor center. But what I really got out of milking my injury was a chance to walk down into the crater with my mom while my dad and sisters drove down. We beat them too, as I recall. On the way out of the park there was an encampment where they explained what life during the seige was like for the Confederate soldiers.

Fredricksburg was a bit more recently, either '97 or '98. I'm a little fuzzy on the exact year and have to go grab some souviners from the Smithsonian museums to find out the year. My baby sister is in the navy and around that time was in A school in Dahlgren, Va. Flew down with my folks to visit her for three-four days. While there we hit the mall in DC then the following day we hit Fredricksburg. Biggest problem we had was trying to actually find the park. We'd found the visitor center no sweat and had checked out the displays. But then we took the car so as to visit the sunken road, the Kirkland memorial (which I was actually more intrested in finding after having read about him years before), and all that area. As I recall, at that time the sunken road was one way for car traffic, though I doubt it's changed if they're still letting cars go down it. We nearly got lost trying to find the entrance to the sunken road and almost gave up on that.

Beyond the places I've visited, I amassed a small collection of historic books on the war, but that's normal. My current prizes in my collection are reproductions of Union army manuals from Stackpole books. My dad's told me that in eighth grade my history teacher told both him and my mom that I actually knew more about the war than he did and at times when we were studying it he'd either turn the class over to me or would ask me if things he was teaching us were accurate. That's something I have a harder time believing than I was intrested in the war at a young age and we visited Appomatox and Durham Station. As a teenager, I'd think I'd have remembered if one of my teachers was actually turning a class over to me because I knew the subject better. I do remember that in eleventh grade we had to go more in depth on the war and at least half the class was asking me for help with the war because I did actually know more about it than our teachers then appeared to know. Though they weren't exactly history teachers (one was our english teacher and the other was more of an economics teacher, the actual history teacher for the 11th and 12 grades was primarily teaching on the 12th grade team and was not teaching us at the time as he was too buisy with the seniors) and they did pretty much set us loose without doing much in the way of teaching the subject.

What probably helped bring half class looking to me for help was that initially both the 11th and 12th grades would have one period a day during the regular class periods where we could take what amounted to a mixed elective. For whatever the reason this was dropped after the first half of the year, my guess was that we needed to focus on more grade specific subjects during the second half that we didn't have during the first half. At anyrate, the whole idea was that each of the teachers would teach a specific subject, history, creative writing, etc., each quarter and we had to sign up for each. So you'd get so many seniors and juniors in a class that was a bit smaller and more indepth. Second quarter I took the history course and for the final project of the course I did a pamphlet on the war, complete with a cardboard map of Sherman's March to the Sea then through the Carolinas. Got an A+ which wasn't easy to hide from the rest of the juniors since I had to turn it in late thanks to a computer crash and a very understanding teacher. Plus since all the rooms were open to everyone in the 11th and 12th grade, folks could easily see my map. So my already having done something on the war earlier in the year probably helped to cause folks to think of me as someone to ask for help.

Last edited on Tue Nov 15th, 2005 07:59 am by Hellcat



 Posted: Fri Mar 3rd, 2006 04:08 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
16th Post
Notch
Neutral Revisionist


Joined: Fri Mar 3rd, 2006
Location: Waynesville, Missouri USA
Posts: 14
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I was born in 1966 and while growing up I really never got involved in anything historical.

I think my interest in history started when I joined the US Army in 1985.

My interest in the Civil War really didn't start until about 5 years ago. I work at a military base and I started seeing a lot of displays of Civil War era stuff so I started reading and ended up watching the Ken Burn's Civil War documentary and found that the stories in the story were fascinating, intriguing, and thought provoking.

The fact that an event that happened over 140+ years ago can still produce stories, news and information and lessons in life is just mind numbing.


I now host a Civil War website, have visited a few battlefields with plans to visit many more, and possibly would like to get involved in reenacting and volunteer work at Wilson's Creek NB (which is not too far from my home).



 Posted: Sat Mar 4th, 2006 05:32 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
17th Post
arooper
Member


Joined: Thu Mar 2nd, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 24
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I was born in 1983, 22 years old. Grew up outside of Boston, MA. I really liked the Alamo movie as a little kid, and we had Ken Burns' Civil War book lying around, I so I always flipped through it and stared at the pictures for hours.

I didn't really get into it until freshman year of college when I took a class about the Civil War in literature now. I wrote a fourteen page paper defending Longstreet's actions at Gettysburg, and I was pretty much hooked at that point.

 



 Posted: Mon Mar 6th, 2006 01:42 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
18th Post
susansweet2
Member
 

Joined: Thu Feb 9th, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 98
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I am it seems older than most of you.  I grew up in the 50's watching the same tv shows.  My favorite was The Rebel with Nick Adams.  I lived in Southern California .  The closest we ever got to the Civil War in the East was a trip when Iwas in 3rd grade to visit my father's cousin in Springfield.  I was crazy about Lincoln that year.  My brother on the other hand wore his kepi hat from Disneyland everywhere he went, he was two years younger.  He had a Confederate one , I had a Union one .  We always bought hats when we were at Disneyland and we went many times a year. 

My dad's cousin took us everywhere around Springfield to show me all the Lincoln sites.  He nick named my brother Beau explaining who Beauregard was to my little brother.  He loved it. 

I studied history in school but focused on English History middle ages and Renaissance. 

I retired from 30 years of teaching and decided to see some of this country.  On the first trip east I saw a sign that said Pea Ridge.  The was the start.  I have visited many battlefields in the South and East in the past few years.  

I have also discovered a Civil War site near my home in Southern California The Drum Barracks.  I now am a docent there once a week, belong to a book discussion group and am program chair of Orange Country Civil War Round Table.  I have come a long way in the past couple of years.  Still have much to learn . 

Susan  



 Posted: Tue Mar 7th, 2006 12:20 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
19th Post
arooper
Member


Joined: Thu Mar 2nd, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 24
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Does anyone else dislike the term "buff"? It sounds so stupid. I'd rather be called an "enthusiast," as silly as that is, or even Civil War bore. Anything but buff.



 Posted: Sat Mar 11th, 2006 12:52 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
20th Post
javal1
Grumpy Geezer


Joined: Thu Sep 1st, 2005
Location: Tennessee USA
Posts: 1503
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

arooper -

When you posted this, I remembered a silly little editorial I wrote on just that subject almost 7 years ago. Searched everywhere and finally found it:

What Do We Call Ourselves?

In the almost four years that Civil War Interactive has been a viable entity, there’s been one question that I ponder almost every day. It obsesses me in a way, like a riddle wrapped in an enigma, surrounded by ...well, you get the idea. It’s a simple question on the surface, and to some, not a very important one. Stated bluntly - what do we call ourselves? By "we" I mean those of us to whom the Civil War is more than a black and white glimpse of a distant past. "We" who actually take pleasure in doing whatever we can to keep the memory of the men and the deeds alive. "We" whose idea of a vacation is hiking steep hills in 100 degree weather as long as the hills are on a battlefield. And yes, "we" who look at the men not as one dimensional symbols of a past forever gone, but instead as three dimensional icons of the freedom that we now enjoy. Are we Civil War Buffs? Civil War Fanatics? Civil War Aficionado’s? Civil War Lovers? You see where I’m going here? We need a damn name. So what should we be called......

Civil War Fan
- I can’t imagine calling myself a Civil War fan. When I think of "fan" I think of sports....football fan, baseball fan, etc. I get strange images of lines of mini-vans slowly parading through Gettysburg waving their banners that read " We Get A Charge Out Of Pickett" or "Meade Will Take Us To The Playoffs!" It denotes cheerleaders on top of Little Round Top reciting "Two, four, six, eight, who do we appreciate......Joshua!!!"

No, Civil War Fan won’t work. Sunday would no longer be the Fan’s sacred day. It would be whatever day Civil War Journal was on. Can you imagine as we sit there like couch potatoes, a huge bowl of chips and a quart of beer in hand, screaming "Sickle’s you bum! Does the word FLANK mean anything to you, you moron!!!" Meanwhile, our spouses desperately parade in front of the TV in various stages of undress, pleading for a moment of attention....."Not now dear, there’s two minutes left in the third day.." Of course, now that I think about it, that’s precisely what I do when Civil War Journal is on.

Civil War Lover
- Another one that just doesn’t sound quite right. Even though we know better, it implies that we love war. "Yea man, and then that whole regiment was decimated...I just love that!" It really labels us as rather demented, lost souls who take pleasure in the carnage that occurred. I imagine that people that don’t understand form a rather disturbing mental picture of us. It probably involves us retiring at night with a good book that we ordered from the back of a Soldier of Fortune magazine. No, I don’t think "Love" and "War" should ever be used together unless "Make" precedes the former, and "Not" precedes the latter..

Civil War Aficionado
- Way too snobbish. Let’s face it, words that sound as if they may even be remotely foreign turn people off. It gives one the image of a stately, erect (in stature we mean, you pig), gentleman escorting a portly woman in an evening gown to a quaint table set up on the banks of Bloody Pond at Shiloh...."The special today will be Carp...". Nope, Aficionado just won’t do it. Picture if you will an Aficionado re-enactor as he gently runs the cork of his canteen under his nose, commenting on the fragrance and the age of the pond water. He would insist that he be allowed to place himself gently on the ground when shot, so as not to disturb the crease in his pantaloons. No, Aficionado is way too presumptuous.

Civil War Fanatic - Well, I’m sure we can all see the problem with this one right off the bat. In this day and age, there’s just too many collateral images that pop into our mind when we hear "Fanatic". Instead of mini-vans, we’d have lines of sandal-clad Ayatollah Khomeni look-alikes in a slow procession through Gettysburg, chanting mantras to the spirits of the lost. The visitors center would look like O’Hare airport during a Hari Krishna convention. I can picture Civil War Fanatic terrorists holding hostages in the State Department...."We demand that the Imperialist Union Government admit to the cover-up of the lost Pickett Report or we will blockade the building until you comply!...". No, there’s enough people out there that think we’re fanatics. Let’s not encourage them.

Civil War Buff
- This one might be the most acceptable, but I still have some problems with it.  It just sounds so superficial. Nowadays (is that a word?) anyone who knows who was fighting, or in what century the war was fought, can be considered a buff (i.e. possessing a higher than average knowledge of the event). A Buff sounds like he or she would be better at minutiae, rather than a thorough understanding of the war. A Buff might know the size of the boot that Stonewall was wearing when he was shot, but probably has no idea who won the Battle of Chancellorsville. You can be a car buff, or a gun buff, but can you really be a Civil War Buff? I don’t know.....

     So I hope that now you can at least understand my dilemma. There’s a large part of my life that has no name. I’m the bastard child of a nameless Civil War affliction. But I guess we’ll just clog along, secure in the knowledge that we know who we are. Truth be told, I shouldn’t worry so much about what people should call me. I know what they do call me, and that’s bad enough. Till next time........



 Current time is 02:33 pmPage:    1  2  3  Next Page Last Page  
Top




UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.4511 seconds (7% database + 93% PHP). 25 queries executed.