View single post by indy19th
 Posted: Thu Apr 20th, 2006 01:47 pm
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indy19th
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javal1 wrote: Interesting conversation. I would suggest however that someone open a new thread on the legalities of seccession, rather than continuing it here. Not a demand, just a suggestion. To combine two hot topic subjects under one thread may make it too difficult to navigate.

I was thinking the same thing. It's so easy to stray off topic. Would it be to much to ask that some of these posts be transplanted to another, new thread?

I was going to post one more thing. It's in regard to the requirement for a nation's sovereignty:

In international law, the term recognition refers to the formal acknowledgment by one state that another state exists as a separate and independent government. Recognition is not a mere technicality. A state has no status among nations until it is recognized by other states, in spite of the fact that it might possess all other attributes of a state, including a definable territory and population, a recognizable government, and a certain amount of continuity or stability.

The decision to recognize a new national government is a political act that is in the discretion of the officials who are responsible for foreign policy. In the United States, the president makes the decision to recognize a country and can do so by making a formal announcement or by having another official, such as the secretary of state, make the announcement for him. Recognition can also be informal, such as by opening negotiations with a new state or exchanging diplomats with it.

A nation is not truly sovereign and independent unless other nations recognize its sovereignty. Formal recognition operates to assure a new state that it will be permitted to hold its place and rank as an independent political body among the nations.


 http://www.answers.com/topic/recognition
 

Last edited on Thu Apr 20th, 2006 02:08 pm by

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