View single post by indy19th
 Posted: Wed Jun 21st, 2006 07:34 pm
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indy19th
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I thought this was a bit of a stretch. How can the loss of part of the field that no one could visit before, destroy what's already part of the park? I know that the area around Marye's Heights is not what it should be, but it's still a great site to visit. It's got part of the freaking stone wall. Plus the areas south of the park, including Prospect Hill, are well worth a stop.

 

Finally, Frank O’Reilly, historian and author of the authoritative book The Fredericksburg Campaign:



Winter War on the Rappahannock movingly says:




“The Slaughter Pen is the very heart and soul of the Fredericksburg Battlefield. Without it, nothing makes sense. This is the point where the battle was won and lost on December 13, 1862. After Burnside’s bloody failure here, there was nothing the Union Army could do to win the Battle of




Fredericksburg – or the Confederates to lose it. Correspondingly, this is where Preservation ultimately will win or lose the struggle for Fredericksburg’s history.




“Once this national treasure is gone, there will be nothing worthy of saving. Standing on this unblemished historic land – christened in the blood of brave men, North and South – one touches the past, and understands the sacrifices of those men on the most decisive point of the Fredericksburg Battlefield. They fought for this land, and paid for it with their lives – for the future, for us. We need to fight for this land, too – for the past, for them, lest we forget.”




“This hallowed ground means more to me than just about any other in Civil War history. If it is lost, then the whole Fredericksburg Battlefield will become meaningless and irrelevant. This battlefield may die if that field disappears.”




 

Last edited on Wed Jun 21st, 2006 07:43 pm by

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