View single post by HankC
 Posted: Mon Jul 10th, 2006 04:02 pm
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HankC
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Shadowrebel wrote: HankC,

You wrote
Oh, please...If you are merely going to cut and paste from LewRockwell.com, I can just read it there, if I were so inclined...
You are now asking about what you are calling "3 snippets", which are three historical events. First you imply that my whole post is from Lewrockwell.com, now you say three snippets. These historical events are neither my words, Adam's, Neely's, or Dieteman's they are events you can find in any number of places.

 

The words I used, from your first reply to me, are taken exactly and without attribution from another writer. That's not exactly a good lead to the rest of your presentation ;) Any tint of plageriasm throws great doubt on the entire...

When you wrote, or rather when you lifted from Dieteman, "see Charles Adams, p 46-53", I assume you mean Charles *Francis* Adams, but which of his many books?

Also in your cherry-picking of evidence from the UMKC law site about the 13th amendment it is curious that you ignored the snippet directly above that which you *did* use, to wit:

Was the Civil War about slavery?

The short answer is "yes."  One might consider, for example, Mississippi's 21-paragraph declaration of reasons in 1861 for leaving the Union.  Only two paragraphs, one introductory and the other conclusory, did not mention slavery.  The state's principal complaints concerned the refusal of free states to return fugitive slaves and opposition of the extension of slavery into the territories.  The election of Abraham Lincoln, on an anti-slavery platform, obviously had a lot to do with the decisions of southern states to secede as well. 
The best evidence that "states' rights" was a secondary interest of the southern states is the Confederate Constitution which forced states to accept central authority on the issue of slavery and required all new territories in the Confederation to become slave states, regardless of the popular will of the people of the new state.


As far as "The North teached that Lincoln freed the slaves, he did not", many people have reached that conclusion without being so "teached".

Do you have any references to textbooks with the actual 'teachings' you love to hate or is it only anecdotal?

 

HankC



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