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 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2008 06:00 pm
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ole
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Better hope that you're genetically immune to lard, Girl. The taste is heavenly, but many, many will pay for their indulgence.

Maybe this ought to be on the comfort-thread, but on top of the wood-stove was an ocher enamelled cup. This is where the bacon and ham grease went. And in it was a cloth. The cloth would be used to wipe the baking or frying pan with bacon grease. You don't want it to stick, wipe it with bacon grease. This was used to fry potatoes, eggs, and a dollop or two more would work with chicken. It worked with catfish and shortening for almost everything. Where it didn't work, lard was the choice.

Mother would make ginger snaps. Aside from the traditional ingredients, bacon fat was the shortening. And you can't make a decent pie-crust unless you use real lard. Are we missing something here?

Where I came from, people ate this sort of ill-advised food all of their lives and managed to reach their late 80s in spite of it. Many of them got into their 90s.

The conditions for your ancestors, and his, and hers, and mine differed only slightly. We all ate stuff that appears strange to each other. But check it out. Every group of people designed their diet around what was available as to protein, carbs, and maybe more than a little bit of fat. While the Italians and Chinese and a few other groups ate pasta, the northern Europeans ate potatoes. Same difference.

In Central and South America, they eventually figured out that a combination of beans and corn was every bit as nutritious as a rib-eye. (Rare and salted only.) Chicken is as good for you as a pork chop.

A person has to have protein, carbs, and that which comes from veggies and fruits. A centuries-old process of figuring out that which maintains. So. When you figure that the Germans ate differently than the French or Italians or Brits, they still settled on the fomula of protein, carbs, and that which comes from veggies and fruits. Each had centuries of developing that which worked for them.

So, while we get comfort food from gramma and her mother, there is a design behind it. This sustains life. (That it might not be good for you is entirely beside the point.)

One of these days, someone is going to be able to evaluate your genes and be able to accurately tell you what you, personally, ought to avoid. Like, "gravy is going to kill you." Or, "You really ought to avoid ice cream."

We're not there yet, but we're getting there. And, until someone tells me that I can no longer have a hot roast-beef sandwich. I'll have one whenever I can find or make one. (And, when that someone does, I have an unused finger with which to make a salute to his/her advice.)

I'm guessing that all of us like our thing, and woe to the person who decides that we ought not have it.

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