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 Posted: Fri Dec 4th, 2009 08:10 pm
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javal1
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Joined: Thu Sep 1st, 2005
Location: Tennessee USA
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Tim,

To me Lebanon Bolgna is a misnomer. What it actually is a a slowly smoked sausage., with lots of spices....let me see if I can find something.....Ok, here ya go:

Originating with the Pennsylvania Dutch, Lebanon bologna was developed with heavy influence coming from slow-cured sausages of Europe. It it is commonly available throughout Pennsylvania and is often served as a luncheon meat. It is named for the Lebanon Valley of Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, where it is most commonly produced. There are two versions, original and sweet.

The thermal processing of Lebanon bologna typically does not exceed 120oF (48.8oC) due to undesirable quality effects high heat has on the final product. Because it is not cooked to a higher temperature, other ingredients and processes are used to control microbial growth. [1] Fermenting the product to a low pH coupled with the inclusion of curing salts inhibits the outgrowth of pathogenic bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, as well as spoilage organisms.

Typically, the blended and stuffed beef sausage is aged for 10 days prior to smoking to enrich lactic acid bacteria and allow for the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. [2] Fermentation occurs during the smoking step, which can last for up to 4 days. [3] A 1 pH unit (or more) decline is observed during this step, as well as the development of nitrosohemochrome, the pigment responsible for the red color of cured meats.

Sometimes cream cheese is spread onto slices of Lebanon bologna, rolled and then cut into small sections, and served as an appetizer. Lebanon bologna can also be fried.

In short - Lebanon Bologna actually has a taste, unlike what we call bologna.

 

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