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 Posted: Wed Feb 29th, 2012 01:27 pm
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Savez
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The people of Ohio thought Lincoln went too far...

 
http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/P?mal:11:./temp/~ammem_HBGc::

from the above letter...

"The people of Ohio, are willing to co-operate zealously with you in every effort warranted by the Constitution to restore the Union of the States, but they cannot consent to abandon those fundamental principles of Civil liberty, which are essential to their existence as a free people-- In their name we ask, -- that by a revocation of the order of his banishment, Mr Vallandigham, may be restored to the enjoyment of those rights of which they beleive, he has been unconstitutionally deprived."

Here is what Lincoln told them...

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/mal:@field(DOCID+@lit(d2449400))

"You ask, in substance, whether I really claim that I may over-ride all the guarrantied rights of individuals, on the plea of conserving the public safety -- when I may choose to say the public safety requires it-- This question, divested of the phraseology calculated to represent me as struggling for an arbitrary personal prerogative, is either simply a question who shall decide, or an affirmation that nobody shall decide, what the public safety does require, in cases of Rebellion or Invasion-- The constitution contemplates the question as likely to occur for decision, but it does not expressly declare who is to decide it. By necessary implication, when Rebellion or Invasion comes, the decision is to be made, from time to time; and I think the man whom, for the time, the people have, under the Constitution, made the Commander-in-Chief, of their Army and Navy, is the man who holds the power, and bears the responsibility of making it.* "

Bold and italics mine*

Sounds like a touch of narcissism in that response if you ask me.

 

Last edited on Wed Feb 29th, 2012 01:28 pm by

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