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 Posted: Tue Nov 6th, 2007 05:36 pm
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ArtorBart
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Can y'all tell I've got nothing better to do and am plumbing the depths of CWi for something of interest?

1776, though historically inaccurate in many details, tells the story of our nation's birth very effectively. When slavery finally rears its ugly head near the end of the movie, our "irrepressible conflict," the American Civil War, is plainly forecast. "What are we? Demigods? For God's sake, John, let's make America first." I'm not sure the ethical showdown between Adams/Franklin and Rutledge/other "deep southerners" is accurate, but it's great drama. The final compromise by Jefferson/Adams -- giving in to Rutledge's demand to "remove the offending passage" -- led to the many subsequent compromises in the ensuing years [Missouri, Kansas-Nebraska, et al.].

The maneuvering/delaying tactics that Adams & Franklin pulled a couple of times [to have a written declaration and the polling of the Pennsylvania delegation] were truly fine examples of parliamentary procedure that also provided cinematic tension. After the final vote is taken, notice the total quiet that intervenes before John Adams says, "It is done."

I was sad to learn that Virginia Vestoff -- Abigail Adams -- died in 1982. She and William Daniels portrayed the true-life closeness of the real John & Abigail; their correspondence with each other was a long-distance, slow-motion love-affair and served much like a psychologist's couch for John during this tumultuous time in this nation's history.

Have y'all heard that Richard Nixon censored the movie? He spoke to Jack Warner to have the song "Cool Considerate Men" excised from the original film version. Tricky Dick was afraid the Continental Congress' conservatives were portrayed as too stuffy, too concerned about wealth, too egocentric, etc. What we can buy on DVD today is a restored, "as intended to be released in 1972" version.

Always enjoyable to watch! Highly recommended!

Art in Tampa

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