View single post by susansweet
 Posted: Thu Dec 13th, 2007 07:28 pm
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susansweet
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Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: California USA
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Mana: 

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What are your references that cite that people were more caring on the plantations than they are today?  Who would run the plantations today?  How many people actually lived on plantations back then , how many lived on small farms or up in the hollows scratching out a living ?How many lived in towns? 

Very few gangs like we have today?  hmm ever heard of Jesse James, Cole Yoonger, The Daltons, the Doolans, The Baldnobbers to name a few.  You think gangs today are violent?  Read about some of these gangs. 

Men today think they have a right to beat women? Women in the 19th century  were considered their husbands personal property.  He could divorce her and the children became his legally not hers.  If he died he could leave his personal property to someone else not his wife and usually did. 

You want to read what it was really like especially for women pick up any book by Catherine Clinton.  Tara Revisited is one ,subtitled WomenWar and Plantation Legions revisited

Any of the many books by Catherine Clinton would also be good to read to see what life for women was really like. 

As to people helping each other , some did some didn't , today some do, some don't , depends on who they are , and where they are , same as it was back then.

What other ways of the Old South would you like to go back to?  How about Yellow Fever.  It ran though the plantations like wildfire.  

Many women working in the fields with their husband, those that did not own plantations  were soon aged beyond their years.  Many died in childbirth with no help except their family to deliever the child. Or they died of infections after giving birth because of the sanitary conditons.   Many large southern families lost several children before they reached the age of maturity . 

Just a few things to think about.  As for me I will stick with the 20th Century .

Susan

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