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 Posted: Fri Jan 11th, 2008 07:09 pm
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ole
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Do something in Geordie for us.



 Posted: Fri Jan 11th, 2008 07:12 pm
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Roger
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What yer gannin' on aboot ole man?



 Posted: Fri Jan 11th, 2008 08:32 pm
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ole
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Thanks, Roger. Not bad at all! (Like I'd know!)

Some years ago, I mentioned that I got so much more out of Monty Python's "Holy
Grail" when subtitles became available on a dvd. Was almost hooted out the forum! Imagine, subtitles for a movie in English!

Saw a movie some time ago that was apparently done in southern Scotland. If it weren't for the subtitles, I would have caught but about half of the words.

Was in Corinth, Mississippi this last summer. Had country ham for breakfast but wasn't provided a knife with which to cut it. I asked the young man behind the counter for a knife. He didn't know what I was talking about. Finally had to resort to cutting motions before he figured out that I wanted a "naahf."

I'll expect that the thoroughly charming waitress had as much difficulty in deciphering what we ordered. Can't deny that there is an air of hospitality down there, although I'll bet we were the subject of more than a few remarks after we had left. It's always recommended to leave a generous tip. Money talks.

ole



 Posted: Fri Jan 11th, 2008 08:44 pm
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ole
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By the way, I was testing Dixie Girl. Figured you'd have a good handle on it, Roger. A British accent ain't necessarily Cary Grant or David Niven. Suspect there's as much difference in English idiom as there is here. There was a time when it was possible to listen to a sentence and get really close to where the person was born (ala 'enry 'iggins). Now we have a Bama in Illinois, and a southerner being required to acquire a Sooner speak. We have Colonel Clewell in Nawth Carlina and questions about the proper spelling of Tar Heel. (Have a lady on a chat room that insists on a certain way. But I forget what it ought to be. I have to ask her every time we run across each other.)

Just rambling.

ole



 Posted: Sat Jan 12th, 2008 05:21 am
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Roger
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Keep ramblin' ole, it's entertaining. I like the sound of country ham for breakfast, I have to make do with porridge.

Roger



 Posted: Sat Jan 12th, 2008 04:56 pm
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susansweet
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Ole I asked Teej again last night in the chat and she insist it is TAR HEEL and as she says she was born and raised in North Carolina. 

I have had the same kind of experiences in the South ordering.  Pull up to a Sonic and try to order with my California accent over a speaker.  In Vicksburg I ordered a diet coke.  Drove off and took a sip of something that when I pulled over and looked was bright red.  Some kind of cherry something so sweet it was not drinkable.

In Oklahoma I ordered a grilled cheese at Sonic and got a grilled chicken sandwich. 

It is hard anymore to really tell where someone is from.  My father was from Idaho , my mother from Oklahoma.  I grew up here in Southern California.  My speech is scattered with Southern terms from mother , and western terms from my father plus typical SoCal speech. NO I donot speak Valley Girl .

For a period of time when McDonell-Douglas was bringing engineers over from England many of the children were put in my class.  I had three families, I learned a great deal of English from these kids.   Each family from a different section of the country.  Devon and Blackpool, I don't remember where the third was from.  We all learned new words.   One of the families had a little one that came to school with Mom when she worked in my room.  She had an American accent at the time.  They moved back to Blackpool. Five years later they came to visit again.  The child then sounded like Paul McCartney!!!

Susan



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