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 Posted: Wed Jan 16th, 2008 04:02 pm
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TimHoffman01
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AMen OLE.

It DOES start at home.  Whenever I read in the papers how more and more stuff is being legislated to be taught in the schools, I keep wondering where the parents are in all this.  This is especially true when they want to start legislating VALUES to be taught.  I don't know about the Joe on the street, but I learned MINE from my PARENTS and GRANDPARENTS.  That is as it used to be, and IMHO as it should be.

  I really don't want a teacher who is already doing all he/she can to try to teach 30+ kids an academic subject to have to turn around and teach them how to live their lives.  Now, showing that certain values (honor, truthfullness, hard work, etc.) actually have value is one thing, but not to have to instill those values.  That is just asking too much.

Even with academics, home examples mean more than a ton of classes.  If I demonstrate to my kids that a subject (history for example) can be interesting and has an importance, they are more likely to wonder about it on thier own and explore.  If I demonstrate only contempt for it, or a total lack of interest, then they will in turn apply no value to it in school or life.  Hence, I take my kids interesting places whenever I can.  They see me reading all the time.  My wife and I keep on them to do their homework before other things (such as sports or scouting).   We are clear on what must come first.



 Posted: Wed Jan 16th, 2008 05:28 pm
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ole
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Tim: Your efforts will be rewarded in ways you cannot begin to see.

Mine had nothing to offer. But they made sure that we were exposed. Intuitive? I have no idea where it came from but there was one thing apparent in growing up helter skelter: it was expected that each of us was to do something worthwhile.

Parents. There is no substitute.

ole



 Posted: Wed Jan 16th, 2008 10:51 pm
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susansweet
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Bless you Tim.  When I retired they were just starting the Values education in California.  This included another assembly once a month to pass out certificates to children showing the value of the month.  I was helping out in a friends classroom that year.  I would show up to do activities with her kindergarteners and once a month I attended an assembly instead.  Or rather I attended one assembly .  After that I just went home on those days . I had better things to do. 

Susan



 Posted: Thu Jan 17th, 2008 12:22 am
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Johan Steele
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I have a tendency to take my hat off to teachers, at least those I know are giving it their all. My mother was a teacher for most of 30 years... and saying the two of us didn't get along would be like saying Genghis Khan dabbled in real estate. My wife is a teacher as is a brother in law. The pay sucks and the appreciation is non existant but the knowledge that a young mind has been opened to knowledge. And many of those young minds will forever fondly remember the teachers that opened that door. I know I do to this day... though it was a college professor and not a grade or secondary school teacher.

Many a teacher has been the pathway to want for higher education for a child. Ole is quite right, it has to at least start at home.



 Posted: Thu Jan 17th, 2008 03:44 am
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ole
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Shane, I've run across a few who, and I thank God mine never got into, were teachers in name only. Some really incredible dolts are there marking time and feeding the little buggers who knows what.

A real teacher, and I include Miss Susan, is a precious asset. Somehow, we have to figure out which are real and which just got the degree and are working toward retirement. But if we don't do it, it ain't going to get done. The teacher is a tool, and one would hope that it is a fine tool. But if one doesn't send that kid out knowing that he or she is expected to learn, the teacher is irrelevant.



 Posted: Thu Jan 17th, 2008 06:04 pm
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j harold 587
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At the expense of hijacking the thread how often do we see people in all areas of public service who are logging time to get to retirement. As a state trooper who worked his last 10 years in drug interdiction I was able to screen the officers who worked on my team so only those who wanted to be there were .  I had no room for folks who were showing up for a pay check.

As far as teaching I and My wife did drug and traffic safety presentations in the schools sponsored by my department. They were done on my personal time we were not financially compensated.  Grades K-6 were our target areas. I was doing an interpetation of an Ohio long hunter then, so I was frequently asked to return in costume with that presentation also. The teachers liked being able to use the point that I was in law enforcement and had an interesting hobby too. I also came to school for a reading program for fourth graders where I read my favorie childs book Mrs. Mooly Jumps Over the Moon in uniform.   

To repeat the theme childhood development comes from from the family. It does not need to be a traditional family.  Children need a mentor a parent, relative, neighbor, clergy or a police officer may provide the proper guidance. If the child does not receive the care and training at home they will learn it on the street.   



 Posted: Fri Jan 18th, 2008 05:12 am
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Kentucky_Orphan
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My frame of reference for judging the teaching of history, I am sorry to say, is a bit tainted. The last social studies class I had was in high school (I tested out of the need for taking social studies in college either, I think, because of my 99 percentile score on the Kats test or an ACT score-I can't remember which). Anyway, I was in "AP" (advanced progress) history and it was kinda pathetic. I remember going all through the semester without once having to open my text book-I already knew all the answers. Now, mind you, Kentucky as a state is pretty much smack in the middle, if I am not mistaken, in state high school rankings. Additionally, my high school is in the bottom third of high schools in the state.

However, I think the point is still valid to all parents, and has oft been repeated on this board, take responsibility yourself for your child's learning.I realize the lack of time many parents experience, but this is simply not a satisfactory excuse in my mind. You do not have to sit down for 5 hours and teach-just plant the seed of interest in their mind, encourage learning, and the kids will do the rest. They may seem to deviate from the course for a while (teenagers, hey, I was one not too long ago), but they will come around.

No offense to teachers intended-there are many good ones out there. However, relying entirely on someone else to teach your child is incredibly dangerous and lazy.

 



 Posted: Fri Jan 18th, 2008 05:00 pm
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Fuller
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And I just have to clairfy that I do know better than to assume that just because a child's home life is horrible, doesn't mean that there is zero chance for an education.  My mother had a student in her first grade class who was reading above most 5th graders.  Maybe it had to do with the fact that he was homeless with his mother and she would take him to the library for as long as the doors were unlocked and they would read together.  My mom actually prefers the schools with the more challenged situations.  She has been bullied by the thug parents and has stood her ground with her 5 foot little frame, all for the sake of the kids in her classroom.  She also is considered close to royalty to some parents.  She is the bilingual "Maestra" who they view as the last fighting chance for their kids' future in this country.  She really is underpaid.



 Posted: Sat Jan 19th, 2008 04:09 pm
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Dixie Girl
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Believe it or not I would rather go on a cross country Civil War trip than play video games. I will admit I love Super Mario, Donkey Kong and the other games that go with the Mario thing. War games are also cool and thats as far as video games go for me.



____________________
War Means Fighting And Fighting Means Killing - N. B. Forrest When war does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Stonewall Jackson


 Posted: Sat Oct 31st, 2009 10:27 pm
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greener
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Kids will live history if they are engaged and there is meaning attached to their study that somehow connects them to the topic they are studying. After teaching for 30 years I have seen and experienced some of the most breath taking moments when students give insights and ask meaningful questions during the course of a lesson. One such moment occured recently in my 6th grade classroom when a young man asked whether the North would have been as eager to use slaves if they had proper soil and climate to grow the crops that the South had. On many different levels this is just an astonishing question, asked by a student with many barriers in his life but a zeal for learning. I hope that the rest of you educators out there continue having moments like this in your classrooms. By the way, how would you have responded to this young man's question?



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