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 Posted: Tue Jan 22nd, 2008 02:11 am
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Doc C
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I agree that the Reverend King was an exceptional individual who shaped afro-american history by his non violent preaching and protests. However, I do believe that his contributions were only secondary to those of Frederick Douglas. Imagine, how could a black individual, a former slave, gain entry to the White House, other than as a servant, and visit with the president in the 1860's. Who had influence enough to engage Lincoln to initiate earth shattering policies at the time - emancipation proclamation, blacks in the military.

Doc C



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 Posted: Wed Jan 23rd, 2008 07:20 pm
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younglobo
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Doc C .. Great point had never thought of that .

One of the great men in our history Reverend King RIP



 Posted: Sat Mar 28th, 2009 04:08 pm
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5fish
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Doc C wrote: I agree that the Reverend King was an exceptional individual who shaped afro-american history by his non violent preaching and protests. However, I do believe that his contributions were only secondary to those of Frederick Douglas. Imagine, how could a black individual, a former slave, gain entry to the White House, other than as a servant, and visit with the president in the 1860's. Who had influence enough to engage Lincoln to initiate earth shattering policies at the time - emancipation proclamation, blacks in the military.

Doc C


Doc C,

Could one say Mr. Douglas started the processes but it was Mr. King's that led the final efforts to bring equality too all..... Mr Douglas cracked the walls of injustice but it was Mr. King who smashed through the final walls of injustice bring forth a knew meaning to those few word...."All men are created equal"

A few Musing...

 



 Posted: Sat Mar 28th, 2009 05:01 pm
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Doc C
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I'm not demeaning Rev. Kings role in combating injustice (he did pay the ultimate price) but I think he overshadowed others who perhaps took just as important role in this fight, i.e. Rev. Shuttlesworth in Birmingham. A good book on Rev. Kings role in the civil rights movement and 60's Birmingham is- Carry Me Home By Diane McWhorter.

Doc C



 Posted: Sat Mar 28th, 2009 06:54 pm
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TimK
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Doc - If you have not made it to the Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, it should be very high on your "must visit" list. It is an awesome, awesome place.



 Posted: Sat Mar 28th, 2009 07:16 pm
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Doc C
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There's a rumor floating around my neck of the woods that the road from Easton to St. Michaels, MD will be named in honor of Frederick Douglas. St. Michaels is one of the locations which Douglas lived as a slave. I live just off this road.

Doc C



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