Civil War Interactive Discussion Board Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register


trivia - General Civil War Talk - Civil War Talk - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
 Moderated by: javal1
 New Topic   Reply   Printer Friendly 
 Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 02:16 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
1st Post
cwgeneral
Member
 

Joined: Wed Apr 2nd, 2008
Location: San Antonio, Texas USA
Posts: 3
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I know there are problems because of the lighting strike but I am going through withdrawals also ..What civil war general shot and killed someone connected to the star spangled banner in front of the white house



 Posted: Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 02:33 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
2nd Post
64thNYDrummer
Member
 

Joined: Fri Feb 9th, 2007
Location: Healdsburg, California USA
Posts: 48
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Dan Sickles, I think a more interesting trival fact about the young man he shot, Phillip Keys, is the fact that the man he was named for, Phillip Barton Keys, was a loyalist who fought for the Brits in the Revolution.

Dennis Conklin



 Posted: Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 03:03 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
3rd Post
Anonymous
Member
 

Joined: Thu Apr 3rd, 2008
Location:  
Posts: 1
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Daniel E. Sickles shot and killed Francis Scott Key's son, who was having an affair with Sickles' wife.  He was defended in court by Edwin Stanton, who employed the 'temporary insanity' defense for the first time in U.S. legal history - and won. 



 Posted: Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 09:08 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
4th Post
susansweet
Member


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: California USA
Posts: 1420
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Another question is what did Sickles do with his leg ?



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 02:07 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
5th Post
ashbel
Member
 

Joined: Fri Jan 25th, 2008
Location: Fort Worth
Posts: 165
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Sent it to the Smithsonian.



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 03:19 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
6th Post
Lincoln Fan
Member
 

Joined: Wed Feb 13th, 2008
Location: Mentor, Ohio USA
Posts: 31
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

OK, I'm in this "trivia in exile."
This Union Major owned a famous business establishment in Washington. He was assigned as an aide to McDowell in April of 1862. He married a confederate spy for whom he was a military escort. Their son would be a politician and diplomat and their granddaughter would be the daughter-in-law-of a president. The business establishment still carries his family name. Name him.



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 04:53 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
7th Post
susansweet
Member


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: California USA
Posts: 1420
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Not the right answer Ashbel



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 05:03 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
8th Post
susansweet
Member


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: California USA
Posts: 1420
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Major Joseph Willard , Willard Hotel,   granddaughter a Roosevelt



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 11:17 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
9th Post
PvtClewell
Member


Joined: Wed Jun 13th, 2007
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 420
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Re: Sickles.

Like Ashbel, my first impulse was to say Smithsonian. Checked my notes from the Civil War Institute a couple years ago, which focused on Civil War medicine that year. If I read my notes correctly, I think Sickles sent his leg to the then newly created Amy Medical Museum, now the National Museum of Health and Medicine, which is where the remains of his leg are still on display. Sickles had a small coffin made for his leg.

Ashbel's not far off, though. The Army Medical Museum was located on the mall, right next to the Smithsonian.



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 11:28 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
10th Post
PvtClewell
Member


Joined: Wed Jun 13th, 2007
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 420
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Ha. Just out of curiosity, I checked the Willard Hotel for rates. I requested a single bed, senior citizens discount, for one night. It's $494.10. Sheesh. They better leave the light on for that money. Red Roof Inn looks pretty good to me now. :D

I wonder if they still have the guest register from the 1860s?

We saw the Willard a few years ago on a John Wilkes Booth escape tour conducted by Ed Bearrs. Didn't have time to go inside, though. Plus, we were a pretty rough looking crew. None of us looked like we had $500 on us.



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 01:24 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
11th Post
connyankee
Member


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: Colchester, Connecticut USA
Posts: 83
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Don't feel bad, Pvt.  Wife always wanted to see the Radio City Christmas Spectacular Show in NYC so we went last year.  $1380 for two nights for two at the NY Hilton, $104 to park the car for two nights, $500 for 5 Show tickets, not to mention food and grog.  We had a good time - once a fool, always a fool I reckon.  Next time I'll take the bus.  I im still paying off the bill.

:shock: connyankee



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 01:27 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
12th Post
susansweet
Member


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: California USA
Posts: 1420
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Good job Pvt.   AND he use to go visit the leg on a regular basis. 

Back in the mid 70's I went to Washington for the first time.  My college friend that I was visiting in Virginia took me to breakfast at the Ebbets Bar and Grill where Daniel Webster had bellied up to the bar at one time or another .  As we were wandering around town she pointed out an old building surrounded with fencing.  "That's the Willard " she said .  "Use to be a very famous hotel from the Civil War days "   It looked very sad all closed down .  

The building that is on the site now is not the one Lincoln and Grant visited .  This is the Willard that was build on the site of the orginal in 1904.  Cosed in 1968 it didn't reopen til 1986. 



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 01:31 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
13th Post
susansweet
Member


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: California USA
Posts: 1420
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Conyankee cancel my thoughts of ever seeing the Rockettes .  I had also always wanted to see the show but at those prices I don't thinks so.   I would also have to add plane fare from the West Coast .  Too steep for me. 

Susan



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 01:38 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
14th Post
connyankee
Member


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: Colchester, Connecticut USA
Posts: 83
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Truth or Myth?  I once read that Julia did not allow Grant to smoke cigars in the White House and that he'd go to the Willard lobby to smoke, where he was often entertained by those who offered up political favors, being known forever as "lobbyists."

connyankee



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 01:48 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
15th Post
susansweet
Member


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: California USA
Posts: 1420
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Truth about the smoking in the lobby but I just read that the term lobby is a term that had been used for many years before this all happened.  Like the term Hookers and Joe Hooker just seem to match up. 

Susan



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 02:20 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
16th Post
PvtClewell
Member


Joined: Wed Jun 13th, 2007
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 420
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

ConnYankee,

Also, in Smith's biography of Grant, there are several mentions of Grant smoking cigars in the White House. This one was the most interesting and it came after Pennsylvania Republicans endorsed Grant for a third term. Grant wanted no part of it:

"Two days later Grant struck preemptively. Adjourning to his study after Sunday dinner, he composed a message that removed all doubt as to his intentions. Cabinet members were sent for surreptitiously, and quietly filed into the White House. Julia (from me: Julia loved being First Lady and would have loved another term) had no inkling of what was in store and was surprised at their arrival. 'Is there any news? Why is it you have all happened to call?' (Hamilton) Fish assured the first lady it was merely a coincidence. At that moment, Grant entered the reception room and Julia retired, 'seeing they were about to enjoy cigars.'"

"...as the cabinet was leaving, Julia retured to the room. 'I want to know what is happening. I feel sure there is something and I must know.'
'Yes,' said Grant. 'I will explain as soon as I light my cigar.' The president stepped outside of the room, drew an envelope from his coat pocket, and gave it to a waiting messenger. Then he returned to Julia. 'You know what a to-do the papers have been making about the third term,' said Grant. 'Well, until now I have never had the opportunity of announcing that I do not wish a third term, and I have written a letter to that effect.'
'And why did you not read it to me?'
'Oh, I know you too well,' laughed Grant. 'It would never have gone if I had read it to you.'
'Will you bring it to me and read it now?'
'No,' the president replied. 'It is already posted. That is why I lingered in the hall to light my cigar, so the letter would be beyond recall.'"



 Posted: Sat Apr 5th, 2008 07:03 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
17th Post
Texas Defender
Member


Joined: Sat Jan 27th, 2007
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 920
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

PvtClewell-

  It seems that after many years of marriage, Grant had learned that dealing with Julia required more subtlety than conducting military campaigns.  ;)



 Posted: Sun Apr 6th, 2008 12:23 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
18th Post
ole
Member


Joined: Sun Oct 22nd, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 2027
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Ulysses and Julia. Not exactly Romeo and Juliet, but a study in what could be called a better than typical marriage -- even today.

Julia pretty much ruled the roost -- to a point. (Sound familiar?) Grant hated the very idea of slavery, but Julia kept as many as three with her until Grant's star began to shine nationally.

When he was given command over all the armies, Julia's slaves disappeared. Grant missed her and the children terribly, to the point where they visited frequently, battlefield or not, and Grant kept his oldest boy with him through some gruesome campaigns.

We know these things about him. And I have judged him to be as devoted a father and husband as possible under the circumstances and more.

By the way, Enlisted Man Clewell, loved the story. Hadn't heard that one before, but it is illustrative of the balance they employed in their partnership. He could put his foot down if he were sneaky about it.

ole



 Posted: Sun Apr 6th, 2008 01:04 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
19th Post
Texas Defender
Member


Joined: Sat Jan 27th, 2007
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 920
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

ole-

  It sounds like you've learned a thing or two about leverage.  ;)



 Current time is 07:09 pm
Top




UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.2021 seconds (11% database + 89% PHP). 25 queries executed.