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 Posted: Thu Apr 3rd, 2008 09:53 pm
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cody6397
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well by now you probally all noticed me, but i thought id just stop by and introduce my self anyway.
my favorite general(s) are Meade and Sherman.
i like all historic wars
my favorite battle is fredricksburg
my favorite president is andrew jackson
my favorite book is hatchet
just a few things i thought i should include



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 01:57 am
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Dixie Girl
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welcome cody!!

i have to admit ive never thought about the presidents enough to say i have a favorite. what makes andrew jackson your favorite?

Last edited on Fri Apr 4th, 2008 06:09 pm by Dixie Girl



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War Means Fighting And Fighting Means Killing - N. B. Forrest When war does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard." Stonewall Jackson


 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 06:52 am
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Kernow-Ox
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Hello Cody!



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 01:39 pm
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Scout
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hey cody, i too am curious as to why Old Hickory is your favorite.



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 09:45 pm
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cody6397
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i like him because of the trail of tears. i agree that it was a horrible thing to do but he knew that a president has power. other presidents wouldnt have the guts to say hey get out ! it was cruel that it was done in Winter however.Plus he was a great General in the revolution. He was hard on his troops some historians say that if his men were tired he was tiered if his men were hungry then he was hungry. He also gave up his horse to a wounded soldier



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 10:53 pm
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susansweet
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Cody Andrew Jackson was a teenage boy during the Revoution.   He actually watched a battle from the jail in Camdem South Carolina where he was held prisoners. 

He made his name in the War of 1812 at the Battle of New Orleans fought after the Treaty to end the war was signed . 

The Trail of Tears is one of the periods of his life I do not admire.  I do admire many of the things he did do.   He was a man of the people , not one of the upperclass Virginians or the Adams on New England. 

I also admire how he stood up for and loved his dear Rachel.  I have been to his home in Nashville and visited his and Rachel's grave .  It is a lovely home, a lovely garden with the pavilion in the corner that holds their graves. 

There are many good books about his life .  I would have to look at the shelf to tell you the author of the one I really like .

Susan



 Posted: Fri Apr 4th, 2008 11:09 pm
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Scout
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interesting point on the powers of presidents. i beleive his popularity among the common public and his decidedly unaristocratic development gave him the brass to push the presidential powers in ways not seen before and in some ways since.

being from Nashville i grew up getting a fair dose of old hickory. he was a great general though he distinguished himself mostly in the Creek War and Seminole Wars. And his famous victory came at New Orleans after the War of 1812 had ended. I believe the news reached the battlefield a few days late, right susan? (He was only a boy during the Revolution and i think served as a scout or courier)

I have to say that his dismissal of the Supreme Court ruling which the state of GA lost versus the Cherokee went too far and led to one of the most unfortunate in our many sad dealings with native americans. It was a case in which the Cherokee tried to abide by OUR laws, won, and then were still forced to leave.

but in other ways, particularly the Nullification Crisis he certainly did flex his presidential muscle, and his qualities as a leader are well documented.

Last edited on Fri Apr 4th, 2008 11:17 pm by Scout



 Posted: Sat Apr 5th, 2008 12:58 am
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CleburneFan
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When we lived in Nashville, in 1998 a tornado ripped through parts of the city. That unfortunately ripped apart the gorgeous shade trees that lined the drive way to Old Hickory's home, The Hermitage, ever since the time he lived there. One was a famous 275 year old tulip poplar tree.

Gibson Guitar Company stepped up and used that precious wood from that ancient tree  to make fabulous commemorative guitars. I wish I could have bought one. They went for a premium. The name "Old Hickory" is inlaid on the fretboard. One guitar was given to the Smithsonian Institute and the others were sold with the proceeds going to help maintain and restore The Hermitage. Those guitars must be collectors' items.

Gibson Guitars are headquartered in Nashville. At least they were then. I thought it was a generous thing for them to do to make the best use possible of an ancient tree the tornado brutally ripped apart.



 Posted: Sat Apr 5th, 2008 01:39 am
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Scout
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CF, I remember the '98 tornado very well. I was in high school and practising baseball when in a matter of minutes the sky turned black and we asked our coach if we could maybe go inside for a while...We had a game a few weeks later in donelson and I remember driving through that area with my dad. It seemed like every tree at the Hermitage had been uprooted or split (many of those trees AJ personally planted). Centennial Pak downtown also got hit. It was a very big storm.

As for Gibson it still is downtown several blocks south of the Ryman on Church St. I recall seeing an episode of extreme home makeover a few months back where Gibson donated some great pieces for this kids music room. great stuff.



 Posted: Sat Apr 5th, 2008 01:43 am
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CleburneFan
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What you said brings back so many memories. We drove past The Hermitage a couple of weeks after the tornaod and all the trees looked as if they had been beaten with some kind of grinder. There wasn't a leaf left on any tree. I wonder what Andrew Jackson would have thought if he could somehow have seen the destruction.

Last edited on Sat Apr 5th, 2008 01:44 am by CleburneFan



 Posted: Sat Apr 5th, 2008 01:56 am
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susansweet
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Fan, when I was at the Hermitage a few years ago I saw one of the guitars in a display case in the visitors center before you get to the home.  It was a marvelous guitar .

Susan



 Posted: Sat Apr 5th, 2008 02:05 am
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CleburneFan
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Gosh, I bet it was beautiful! I'm glad that one guitar is on display at The Hermitage.

As an aside, one of my favorite displays at DisneyWorld--if it is still there--is the House of Presidents. It features moving statues of every US President in order. For some odd reason, it always seemed to me that Andrew Jackson has one of the most elegant and eye-catching statues of the entire display, even more so than Theodore Roosevelt or even John Kennedy. 

 



 Posted: Sat Apr 5th, 2008 01:37 pm
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cody6397
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there was a documentry i watched called Andrew Jackson:Good or Evil Presidencey
i apologize, i meant war of 1812 he also fought in the first seminole war. i dont really admire the indian removal act/trail of tears i just belive it was a show of power

Last edited on Sat Apr 5th, 2008 01:43 pm by cody6397



 Posted: Sat Apr 5th, 2008 03:56 pm
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ole
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i dont really admire the indian removal act/trail of tears i just belive it was a show of power

It was really more of a political move. Not that Andy didn't personally want the natives to move, but the good citizens of the deep south put heavy pressure on him to accomplish it. It was not a nice time.

ole

Last edited on Sat Apr 5th, 2008 03:57 pm by ole



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