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 Posted: Tue Nov 15th, 2005 08:29 am
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Hellcat
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My mom had a grandfather (well, at least one anyway that I'm aware of) who fought during the war. Years ago she had the paperwork for his birth and death and some of his military career. Before you ask which side, Confederate. The problem is that someone took that paperwork (and from the sounds of it, it could have been one of her cousins or aunts or uncles as there are a few she has made clear in the past she doesn't like or trust) so she's no longer able to check it and be sure of everything on it. She's pretty sure he fought with the 6th Alabama, though the question I have isn't about his service. Rather, he was supposed to have been wounded during a battle and carried the bullet around for the rest of his life (she's pretty certain he died 1905 and had been born 1844). The battle is one I've been having trouble trying to find out about. She says that the paperwork said he was injured at the Battle of Cold Creek. Can anyone tell me anything about this? Was it another name for some other battle? A minor skrimish? What?

 



 Posted: Tue Nov 15th, 2005 12:27 pm
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javal1
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Welcome Hellcat.

You're not the only one looking for info on "Cold Creek" - see the thread at http://history-sites.com/mb/cw/alcwmb/archive_index.cgi?noframes;read=13591 .

Also saw a reference to this name at http://www.historyforsale.com/html/prodetails.asp?documentid=79426&sstart=11 , which is a site describiing a letter for sale... " Yates had his second brigade at this time, records of the Battle of Cold Creek the following year show the 5th New York Infantry being comprised of two brigades and a volunteer unit..."

Reading the history of the 6th AL Infantry, note they did fight at Cedar Creek (short history below. Good luck on your search.

The Sixth Infantry organized at Montgomery, May 6, 1861, with twelve companies, and about 1400 men. It was first ordered to Corinth, and from there went to Virginia. Reaching Manassas Junction, it was brigaded under Gen. Ewell. It was on the field, but not actively engaged in the first Manassas, and passed the fall and winter in that vicinity. General Rodes succeeded Ewell in command of the brigade. In the spring it moved to Yorktown with the army, and there re-organized, and re-enlisted for the war. It was on the field at Williamsburg, but not under fire. At Seven Pines the regiment took a prominent part, suffering terribly, losing 102 killed, and 282 wounded out of about 650 engaged; while the brigade lost 1296 out of about 2500. Its mutilated columns again took a conspicuous part at Mechanicsville, Cold Harbor and Malvern Hill, and suffered very severely. It was in the advance in the movement across the Potomac, and lost slightly at Boonsboro; but at Sharpsburg was severely cut up, the loss being 52 killed and 104 wounded. The regiment was present, but did not take part at Fredericksburg. With its brigade companions - the Third, Fifth, Twelfth , and Twenty-sixth - Col. O'Neal commanding them, the regiment was in the victorious wave of battle at Chancellorsville, and again its ranks were thinned by its losses. It shared the perils of the Pennsylvania campaign, when Gen. Battle led the brigade, and in the fierce shock on the rocky slopes of Gettysburg it suffered frightfully. Having wintered near Orange Courthouse, the regiment was at the Wilderness, where it lost considerably; and was badly mutilated at Spottsylvania. It took part in the Valley campaign of Gen. Early, and suffered severely at Winchester; and lost a number captured at Cedar Creek. Moving back to Petersburg, it was placed in Fort Mahone, and was almost continuously under fire till its colors were folded at Appomatox; its number present being about 80 men under Lieut. Col. Culver. Of 2109 names on its rolls, nearly 400 perished in battle, 243 died of disease in the service, and 675 were discharged or transferred.



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 Posted: Wed Nov 16th, 2005 04:15 am
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Hellcat
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Thanks for all the help so far. Really wish I had more to give you, but without that paperwork all I can give is word of mouth.



 Posted: Thu Nov 17th, 2005 09:05 pm
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last_cav1971
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The 6th Alabama fought at the well known Battle of Cold Harbor, VA.  They served under Brig. Gen. Cullen A. Battle, part of what was known as 'Battles' Brigade'. 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia; Rodes' Division.

Cold Harbor  

Other Names: Second Cold Harbor
Location: Hanover County
Campaign: Grant’s Overland Campaign (May-June 1864)
Date(s): May 31-June 12, 1864
Principal Commanders: Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and Maj. Gen. George G. Meade [US]; Gen. Robert E. Lee [CS]
Forces Engaged: 170,000 total (US 108,000; CS 62,000)
Estimated Casualties: 15,500 total (US 13,000; CS 2,500)
Description: On May 31, Sheridan’s cavalry seized the vital crossroads of Old Cold Harbor. Early on June 1, relying heavily on their new repeating carbines and shallow entrenchments, Sheridan’s troopers threw back an attack by Confederate infantry. Confederate reinforcements arrived from Richmond and from the Totopotomoy Creek lines. Late on June 1, the Union VI and XVIII Corps reached Cold Harbor and assaulted the Confederate works with some success. By June 2, both armies were on the field, forming on a seven-mile front that extended from Bethesda Church to the Chickahominy River. At dawn June 3, the II and XVIII Corps, followed later by the IX Corps, assaulted along the Bethesda Church-Cold Harbor line and were slaughtered at all points. Grant commented in his memoirs that this was the only attack he wished he had never ordered. The armies confronted each other on these lines until the night of June 12, when Grant again advanced by his left flank, marching to James River. On June 14, the II Corps was ferried across the river at Wilcox’s Landing by transports. On June 15, the rest of the army began crossing on a 2,200-foot long pontoon bridge at Weyanoke. Abandoning the well-defended approaches to Richmond, Grant sought to shift his army quickly south of the river to threaten Petersburg.
Result(s): Confederate victory

Mark

Deo Vindice

Last edited on Thu Nov 17th, 2005 09:08 pm by last_cav1971



 Posted: Thu Nov 17th, 2005 09:20 pm
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last_cav1971
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Here is a portion of Gen. Richard Ewell's battle report mentioning Batttles' Brigade in action.

Just after they came the enemy demonstrated against Jones' brigade, and I placed Battle's brigade, of Rodes' division, to support it, with Doles' on Battle's right. They were instructed not to allow themselves to become involved, but to fall back slowly if pressed. Some artillery posted near the pike on Jones' front was withdrawn. Soon afterward the enemy fell suddenly upon Jones' right flank and front, broke his brigade, and drove it back upon Battle's, which it disordered. Daniel's brigade, of Rodes' division, and Gordon's, of Early's, were soon brought up and regained the lost ground, the latter capturing, by a dashing charge, several hundred prisoners and relieving Doles, who, though hard pressed, had held his ground. General John M. Jones and his aide-de-camp, Capt. Robert. Early, fell in a desperate effort to rally their brigade. I placed it in reserve to reorganize; Battle's brigade, which had rallied in time to do good service, taking its place in the line which was now formed on the ground first occupied. The brigades were as follows: From right to left of my line, Daniel's, Doles', Battle's (Rodes' division); George H. Steuart's, the Stonewall (Walker's), Stafford's (Johnson's division); Pegram's, Hays', Gordon's (Early's division). Battle's left and Steuart's right rested on the pike.

Mark

Deo Vindice



 Posted: Thu Nov 17th, 2005 09:45 pm
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last_cav1971
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Here's a great site.  Should be well worth your time to take a look.

http://www.rootsweb.com/~alcwroot/6th_alabama_inf/

Mark

Deo Vindice



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