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 Posted: Sat Sep 13th, 2008 06:46 pm
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mikenoirot
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I have been looking for a good book, on Sherman's March to the Sea, and have not found many choices.  I see that Noah Andre Trudeau, author of a great Gettysburg histroy, has a new book out: "Southern Storm: Sherman's March to the Sea."  Has anyone read this yet?  How would you rate it?  Would you suggest something else on this subject?  Thanks!



 Posted: Sat Sep 13th, 2008 07:24 pm
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susansweet
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Mike a friend I trust on recommendations for books just finished reading the Trudeau book.  She highly recommends it.  Matter of fact she suggested that our reading group at the Drum Barracks read it later on next spring. 

Susan



 Posted: Sun Sep 14th, 2008 12:55 am
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Johan Steele
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If it's by Trudeau it's golden.

I might also suggest:

Glatthaar, Joseph T., The March to the Sea and Beyond, New York University Press, 1985.

Hitchcock, Henry, Marching with Sherman, University of Nebraska Press, 1995.

Cox, Jacob D., Campaigns of the Civil War.-X. The March to the Sea-Franklin and Nashville, Castle Books, 2002.



 Posted: Sun Sep 14th, 2008 02:53 am
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CleburneFan
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I am presently reading Southern Storm. As soon as I saw Trudeau had written it, I wanted it because I loved his book on Gettysburg. It is very readable. I have to admit some of the books I read teach me a lot of valuable material about the war, but, oh my, can some of them be DRY!!! Not Trudeau.

The only thing I would change--- and it is always what I would change with almost any Civil War book--- is the maps--bigger, more detailed , please.

After I had already purchased this book I discovered that Joseph Glatthaar has written a similar one. I really found Glatthaar's book  General Lee's Army from Victory to Collapse to be most insightful. He writes about the "little guy" in the army--the lowest ranks and lowest officer ranks. I suspect he might take the same tack on his book about Sherman's grand march.

I plan to read Glatthaar's book next year. There are several other fine books in line ahead of it. Meanwhile I am enjoying Southern Storm. One thing it has taught me so far is that at least in the early days of the grand march, Sherman's army had little difficulty foraging. That fact makes me wonder why the CSA army was always so hungry by 1864. and earlier. It also makes me wonder why prisoners at Andersonville and Camp Lawton were so hungry. Apparently there was plenty of livestock, corn and  ubiquitous sweet potatos to be had. Also there were so many head of cattle and other livestock in the relatively close Florida.

The book also makes apparent that CSA cavalry general Joseph Wheeler was under orders from Hood to race ahead of Sherman and destroy all food and items that might be of value to the Union army. So Wheeler's men did their own share of damage in Georgia as a pre-emptive strike. 

Last edited on Sun Sep 14th, 2008 02:54 am by CleburneFan



 Posted: Sun Sep 14th, 2008 06:25 am
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ole
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The book also makes apparent that CSA cavalry general Joseph Wheeler was under orders from Hood to race ahead of Sherman and destroy all food and items that might be of value to the Union army. So Wheeler's men did their own share of damage in Georgia as a pre-emptive strike. 
What did Wheeler have? 3,500 men? But, yes, Wheeler is ignored in many accounts of Sherman's Destructive March. Sherman had 60,000 men travelling in four columns and often playing games with Wheeler's mind. (We're going there. Hah! Gotcha!)

Wheeler couldn't do much but pick off foraging parties and bummers. (Yes. There is a difference.) And try to destroy as much as he could if he could figure out where to destroy them. (Sherman and his commanders played Wheeler like a yoyo.)

Had started another post and fouled up and it went away. I did recommend that you do both The Campaign for Atlanta and Sherman's March to the Sea. There is much groundwork in the Atlanta Campaign that build's on Sherman's planning. (Edited and Published by Savas/Woodbury.) Castel's Decision in the West is also a good choice and is available on the secondary markets.

Just a thought.

ole



 Posted: Mon Sep 15th, 2008 12:16 am
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CleburneFan
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Actually I have already read Castell's book Decision in the West: The Atlanta Campaign of 1864 and found it very interesting. I have also read Atlanta 1864: Last Chance for the Confederacy by Richard McMurry. Both books make a very complete study of the Atlanta Campaign. McMurry has a newer book The Road Past Kennesaw: The Atlanta Campaign of 1864 that I haven't read. I may put it on my list for next year. I like McMurry's writing style and would gladly read any book Castell or McMurry have written about the Civil War.

It seems as if you are arguing with me about the extent of Wheeler's damage to his very own Georgian civilian population. You are reading Southern Storm right along with me. You will see several references to Hood's orders to Wheeler to destroy whatever would be of use to the Union army in Georgia before they could get it. I said Wheeler did his share of damage, but I did not say he did an equal or greater amount of damage than Sherman. Afterall, Sherman prevailed and was the victor in Georgia. But if you choose to read that I am giving Wheeler more credit than he deserves, go ahead. Whatever.

Oh, by the way, I will suggest a book for you on Joseph Wheeler. I just read it a couple months ago and could hardly put it down. A Soldier to the Last: Major General Joseph Wheeler in Blue and Gray by Edward G. Longacre. What a great book! Wheeler is so interesting to me because he not only fought as a very young man for the Confederacy, after the Civil War he fought for the US Army in the Spanish-American War.



 Posted: Mon Sep 15th, 2008 01:17 am
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The Iron Duke
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Gerry's latest show is an interview with Trudeau.

http://www.modavox.com/WTRStudioA/HostModaviewForWTR.aspx?ShowId=446



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"Cleburne is here!" meant that all was well. -Daniel Harvey Hill


 Posted: Mon Sep 15th, 2008 12:42 pm
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ole
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It seems as if you are arguing with me about the extent of Wheeler's damage to his very own Georgian civilian population.

Not at all. I was trying to get at saying that, to hear some talk, Sherman got much of the blame for Wheeler's orders. That is, if someone's ancestor got destroyed by Wheeler, the years of oral history have turned the destroyer into Sherman.

ole;)


Edit: The book recommendation was for mikenoirot. My bad.:shock:

Last edited on Mon Sep 15th, 2008 12:46 pm by ole



 Posted: Tue Sep 16th, 2008 02:30 am
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CleburneFan
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Actually MY BAD, Ole. I didn't understand what you were saying in reference to Wheeler's responsibility for at least SOME of the destruction and abuses of private property in Georgia in 1864. I apologize for the misunderstanding.



 Posted: Tue Sep 16th, 2008 03:57 am
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ole
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I apologize for the misunderstanding.
I neither require nor accept apologies. (Especially since it was my fault for being abstruse. Notice that I'm not apologizing for that?) We've been hanging around together for too long to get upset with an occasional misunderstanding.

ole



 Posted: Thu Oct 9th, 2008 03:57 am
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Kent Nielsen
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Hi. I'm partway through the Trudeau book now. So far it's quite good and quite readable. But I would agree with Johan's suggestion to read the books by Glaathaar and Cox. There are also two small books by Anne Bailey "The Chessboard of War" and "War and Ruin: William T Sherman and The Savannah Campaign" that I would recommend. John F. Marsalek's small book "Sherman's March To The Sea" is a good introduction.

Last edited on Thu Oct 9th, 2008 03:58 am by Kent Nielsen



 Posted: Sun Oct 19th, 2008 09:29 pm
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Kent Nielsen
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I finished Southern Storm several days ago. I highly recommend it.



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