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What's everyone reading these days? - Idle Chit-Chat - The Lounge - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
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 Posted: Sat Jan 31st, 2009 04:12 pm
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susansweet3
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So glad you liked Fanny Kimble.  Did you get her Diary too?  Fanny Kimble's Diary fills in the graps in the other book.  I liked it even more than the first one. 

Susan



 Posted: Sat Jan 31st, 2009 04:20 pm
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susansweet3
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I have read the Princes in the Tower which is the title I am pretty sure of Weir's book.  I also have most of her others on the Tutors and Plantagents .  I don't know the one Browner mentioned.  Have to look into it although the pile here is high. 

I use to read historical mysteries.  Peter Doherty (sp?)  has dozens and dozens of historical mysteries written under different names even.  Read all of his that I could find on English history.  Loved Brother Cadfeal (sp?)  Also there is a series of mysteries about a nun whose is related to Chaucer Dame Feverse  Nun's Tale is the first .  Each is someone and Tale.  Loved those. 

Penman also wrote a series not mystery on the Plantagents.  Then wrote a couple of mysteries using Eleanor as a character.  Those were also good. 

Don't get to read much historical fiction any more  the Civil War keeps me busy . My pile growns instead of shrinks.

Susan



 Posted: Sat Jan 31st, 2009 04:28 pm
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browner
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Hey Susan.  No, I didn't get the diary yet.  Put that one down too.

I really liked the Penman books, and Tom's mom sent me the series with "Nuns Tale" and Bro. Cadfael,  (pardon my spelling) but haven't got to them yet! Actually just pulled them from boxes last week and tried to match series so I can look at the dates and try to get them in order before I start.

Just going to mention to kj about the bbc site (and you guys probably already know it) but its fun to click on the "history hub" and read the forums.  http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/mbhistory/



 Posted: Sat Jan 31st, 2009 04:32 pm
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kj3553
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Yes, that's it -- THE PRINCES OF THE TOWER! LOL! That one should have been obvious, especially as the life and times of Richard III is as fascinating to me as the Civil War.

I've read some of Paul C Doharty's Egyptian mysteries and a few Hugh Corbett ones, too. Also the Brother Cadfael series. I'm also hooked on Peter Tremayne's Sister Fidelma series, and am reading MASTER OF SOULS right now.

I haven't read many of Penman's medieval mysteries, but absolutely love her SUNNE IN SPLENDOUR. That fact that it presents a positive portraint of Richard III probably has a lot to do with that.

Browner, thanks for the link! I'll go check it out now. (back from checking)

Oh wow! Does that look like a good site! I'm going to have to bookmark it and check it out in more! Thanks!!

KJ



 Posted: Sat Jan 31st, 2009 04:41 pm
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browner
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Hey kj, yes i like the site, think you will enjoy it. love their humor too.  they also happened to have mentioned on the latest topic Lady Jane Grey and thats what the book I am reading (Innocent Traitor) is about. 

The Tremayne books you mentioned are also ones I received from Toms family (so grateful they keep me supplied!)and I am with you on Sunne in Splendor. 

We are headed to La. for a week, so I have a stack of books already to go with me, so I can hang out and read while Tom does some preservation work at Cane River.

maybe by the time I get back I will have got at least a couple read.  We are enjoying the book from the chat room too, "Class of 1846".



 Posted: Sat Jan 31st, 2009 04:42 pm
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kj3553
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I think I've got CLASS OF 1846 around the house somewhere. If not, I'm sure I can borrow a copy from one of the members of the Roundtable here in Toledo.



 Posted: Sat Jan 31st, 2009 05:20 pm
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susansweet3
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Class of146 is so good .  I am trying to just stick to the chapters for each week although  I do want to read ahead.  Other books though stop me from doing that. 

Funny Sunne in Splendor is the only one of Pennman's books I have not read.  I started it several times and just couldn't get going on it.  I will someday maybe it is still on the shelf.  Have given away many of my medieval English history books both fiction and nonfiction to make way for Civil War and Western history (Lewis and Clark, Mountain Men and Oregon Trail).

Too many books sooo little time.



 Posted: Sat Jan 31st, 2009 05:35 pm
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kj3553
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I can definitely relate to the "too many books, so little time" thing!

Penman's research in SUNNE IN SPLENDOUR is excellent, and she presents plausible explanations for what happened and why. I've been reading and informally studying Richard III for quite a long while, even before I got hooked on the Civil War! Then again, the Wars of the Roses was a civil war, so maybe there's a connection that I've missed.

Last edited on Sat Jan 31st, 2009 05:35 pm by kj3553



 Posted: Sat Jan 31st, 2009 06:19 pm
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susansweet3
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War of the Roses was a major read for me plus Maud and Stephen's battle for the crown.  Two other Civil Wars right?  I was addicted for many years to English medieval and Tudor history.  Did Renaissance faires etc.  Now the Civil War has taken over.  I do love both though. 

Sharon Kay Pennman starts with Maud and Stephen and works her eay though English history to Richard in that series.  I read many nonfiction works on the period too.



 Posted: Sat Jan 31st, 2009 06:25 pm
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kj3553
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Forgot about Maud and Stephen! Yeah, another civil war.

On the subject of the earlier Plantagenets, a couple other good mysteries are MISTRESS OF THE ART OF DEATH and THE SERPENT'S TALE, both by Ariana Franklin. This is a new series featuring Vesuvia Aguilar, a kind of early forensic pathologist (I think that's the right term). The stories are set during the reign of Henry II. Think of them as CSI: Plantagenet!



 Posted: Sun Feb 1st, 2009 02:52 am
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I decided to take a little vacation from Civil War books and bought the brand new  Madness under the Royal Palms: Love and Death Behind the Gates of Palm Beach by Laurence Leamer & Todd McLaren. The book sells for $16.49 plus S&H at Amazon.com.

The book is one of those I can't put down mainly because it deals with the "stories behind the stories" of major Palm Beach, Florida scandals, most of which have taken place while I have lived in the area--NOT Palm Beach, but close enough that the stories make compelling reading for me.

What the book appears to teach again and again is that even the world's richest people have serious problems, anxieties, frustrations and humiliations. Some of thse end, eventually, in muder. And, yes, in Palm Beach you truly can never be too rich or too thin.

The author, who lives in Palm Beach explains much of what is expected of the super rich and what they expect of one another. The main focus of their lives during the winter "season" is an endless round of nightly charity parties and balls at which the women attempt to have the most exquisite gowns and the hostesses complete to have the utmost in party decor, menus, orchestras and a supremely elite guest list.

The book has especial currency because of the Bernard Madoff scandal. One of Madoff's homes, one worth over nine million dollars is in the heart of Palm Beach right beside the Intracoastal Waterway. Two days ago some "Trust fund kids" threw rolls and rolls of toilet paper all over the trees in his front yard. Word leaked out they did so because their parents had lost every cent in their heirs' trust funds, thanks to Madoff's outrageous Ponzi scheme.

 Madoff was a prominent member of the exclusive  Palm Beach Country Club member. He allegedly has cleaned out the bank accounts of so many of his closest friends at that very club.

Just being among the super wealthy of the world does not protect those lucky folks from being victims of the temptations caused by so much money. This book does a splendid job of giving the common man and outsiders such as myself a glimpse of that hidden life. I don't feel so envious of them anymore.

 

 



 Posted: Sun Feb 1st, 2009 07:38 pm
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pamc153PA
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After reading American Brutus, and re-reading Nothing But Victory, I took a brief breather from the CW, and am now reading Change of Heart by Jodi Picoult. I was on a Picoult streak a couple years ago, and read about five of hers in a row, starting with Keeping Faith, which took place in the Lancaster PA Amish community. Picoult does an excellent job of telling a story from multiple viewpoints, IMHO, and creates characters that are easy to visualize. Her plot lines are usually really believable, though the initial premise might not be. For example, in Change of Heart, a man who killed a woman's husband and daughter 11 years before and was given the dealth penalty for the crime has decided he wants to donate his heart to the woman's other daughter, who was not yet born when her husband was killed. There are all kinds of twists, moral and legal, and it's hard to put the book down, which has happened to me with all Picoult's books.

After this, I think I'll go back to that TOWERING stack of CW books I have yet to read, and maybe choose one from the bottom. . .

By the way, nice bump for the thread I started way back when, kj!

Pam



 Posted: Sun Feb 1st, 2009 07:42 pm
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kj3553
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You're welcome, Pam! I've seen Jodi Picoult's books in the store a lot, but wasn't sure if they were something I would like to read. Maybe that's because originally, they were recommended to me by a woman I no longer care for. I know; bad reason not to try a book! LOL! :D

CleburneFan, the book you wrote about sounds fascinating, and particularly relevant to what's going on in the world of finance these days.

Thanks to everyone for bringing out such interesting and tempting reads. You have only reinforced my belief that there is never enough time to read all the books we want to read!

Last edited on Sun Feb 1st, 2009 07:44 pm by kj3553



 Posted: Mon Feb 2nd, 2009 11:46 pm
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The Iron Duke
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It looks like the new Cleburne biography is finally available. However, I don't know what new information it has if any.

http://www.amazon.com/Invisible-Hero-Patrick-R-Cleburne/dp/0881461083/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1233621682&sr=8-2

Last edited on Mon Feb 2nd, 2009 11:47 pm by The Iron Duke



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 Posted: Tue Feb 3rd, 2009 12:07 am
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Have finished Madness Under the Royal Palms. My mom is reading it now. I have a long list of family members who want to read it, because the scandals in the book played out on our local TV stations and in the Palm Beach Post. We all felt like spectators in the events or voyeurs if you will.

Now I'm reading a book I selected because Johnny Depp and Christian Bale will be appearing in Universal's movie "Public Enemies" in late Spring based on Depression-era bank robber extraordinaire, John Dillinger, and the G-man who relentlessly pursued him, Melvin Purvis. Depp plays Dillinger and is said to wear the very same size clothing. Bale plays Purvis. The director is Michael Mann.

The script is taken from information in the book Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 1933-34 by Bryan Burrough. While the movie deals with only the Dillinger and Purvis relationship, the book is much more complete, including such well known criminals as the Barker-Karpis gang, Clyde Barrow's and Bonnie Parker's gang, Baby Face Nelson, Pretty Boy Floyd and Machine Gun Kelly plus many others who operated throughout the US just before and during the Depression.

This is just one more book I am having a hard time putting down and find myself neglecting housework and other obligations to race through its action-packed pages.  The "real-life" Bonnie and Clyde saga is particularly interesting as is the story of the Barker-Karpis gang. Once I get through this great book, I plan to get back to my Civil War book pile.



 Posted: Tue Feb 3rd, 2009 12:17 am
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Iron Duke. I just followed that link to Amazon and ordered the book. This is the time of year I like to read about Cleburne because we are coming nearing his birthday. There is also another Cleburne book that just came out that interests me, "Cleburne: A Graphic Novel." I'm not normally given to reading graphic novels but will make an exception in this case. However, times being what they are, I'll have to wait until it is being sold used at Amazon.

Many thanks Iron Duke, for alerting me to the new Cleburne book.



 Posted: Tue Feb 3rd, 2009 03:47 am
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  Southern Storm---Noah Andre Trudeau.

  Brigades of Gettysburg--- Bradley M Gottfried.

  Sickles The Incredible--- W.A. Swanberg.  Read this one 3 times already but never get bored reading about this charactor, pre, during, and after civil war life. lol.

  Wow !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!   My Brain hurts, lol.

 



 Posted: Tue Feb 3rd, 2009 08:04 am
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susansweet3
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With price of books I have to wait til both Cleburne books come out used on Amazon.  I did read an article about him in North & South I think this past month.  Here I was supose to be doing something important at the Drum but since I don't get paid anyway and there was no tour to do I was sitting reading the magazine in the library.  Had to read what they said about Patrick. 

Susan



 Posted: Tue Feb 3rd, 2009 04:35 pm
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Just finished the John Hunt Morgan biography by Dee Alexander Brown. 

Great story.  Dee Brown is a master in the use of the English language.

This book has been reprinted.  Bought a hardbound copy for $7.95 at Half Price Books.

 

 



 Posted: Wed Feb 4th, 2009 04:52 am
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kj3553
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I love getting books that are discounted!

I finished another historical mystery -- one of the Sister Fidelma novels -- and decided to start tackling my non-fiction pile. At least, one of them.

For Christmas, my mother bought me a book called THE HARP AND THE EAGLE: IRISH-AMERICAN VOLUNTEERS AND THE UNION ARMY, 1861-1865 by susannah Ural Bruce. Mom knows of my love for things Irish, especially Irish + Civil War. Not sure if any of this has to do with KJ *hearting* Notre Dame! No, that's just silly. ;)

However, when I used to go to Gettysburg (don't travel like I used to), I always made a point of visiting the statue of Fr. Corby and discussing "our" team! :D

So anyhoodles, this is what I'm reading now. Can't really say much on how it is, as I'm only on the first chapter. If any of you can recommend other worthwhile reads on the Irish in the Civil War, would you post them here? I've got a few, such as Fr. Corby's memoirs, a couple of regimental histories as well, and love reading first hand accounts -- letters, diaries and memoirs (though the latter tend to be influenced by 20/20 hindsight and revised versions of history).



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