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What's everyone reading these days? - Idle Chit-Chat - The Lounge - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
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 Posted: Fri May 29th, 2009 03:00 pm
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susansweet3
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Only the Blue and Gray issue that just came out with a driving tour and information about Battle

 



 Posted: Sat May 30th, 2009 02:02 pm
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Henry
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fedreb wrote: Whilst on holiday recently I picked up a book by John Baldwin and Ron Powers called "Last Flag Down", the story of the commerce raider Shenandoah. It is written from the daily log of Lt Conway Whittle, the ships executive officer and ancestor of author John Baldwin. It gives the reader a very good feel of how tough life at sea was, not only the daily routine drudgery of working a sailing ship but of being alone at sea, no home port to run to and unsure of who your friends were or even if your country was still at war, whilst hunting down and taking many prizes from the US merchant and whaling fleets and in that respect it is a very good book. I do feel though that it is very harsh in its treatment of the Captain, James I Waddell, who it would seem was only aboard the ship so that he could be blamed for everything that went wrong whilst his young exec is credited with everything right. Maybe that's how it was, maybe not, and it certainly has me searching now for other accounts of the Shenandoahs' epic voyage,  those of Captain Waddell and other officers and crew members.
Another rendition of the cruise of the "Shen" is one compiled under the guidance of D. Alan Harris and was pressed by the University of Alabama Press. "The Voyage of the CSS Shenandoah" in 2005. All due respect to cousins Baldwin and Powers, this one is the pick of the litter to me.

Attachment: chatta2.jpg (Downloaded 91 times)



 Posted: Sat May 30th, 2009 08:38 pm
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The Iron Duke
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Cap'n,

I take it that you don't see yourself reading Cozzens' books over and over again?

Last edited on Sat May 30th, 2009 08:42 pm by The Iron Duke



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 Posted: Sat May 30th, 2009 10:35 pm
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ole
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I have something like 10 started books on my reading table. Actually that's not true; Dear One clears that table regularly and stacks them in my rom. So I have 10 started books stacked behind my chair. I'm still reading Southern Storm, two books on Perryville, one on Wildcat Mountain and one on "How the States got their Shapes."



 Posted: Tue Jun 2nd, 2009 11:35 am
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susansweet3
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Reading like Ole does, many at a time.  Reading the Assassin's Accomplice for Drum Book discussion.  Can't get into it. 

Reading Hafendorfer's Perryville. Must get that finished in next week or two.

Have also started and almost finished South Carolina's Civil War and Klein's Days of Defiance.   on

Also have started a book on the California Column in Arizona during the Civil War.

Just picked up a book yesterday on Andrew Jackson   American Lion which I think I will bring with me on the plane to Kentucky.  Like to take longer books with me on a trip . I once finished all my reading material an hour out of Los Angeles on a plane.  I was beside myself with nothing to read for that hour .  I now always have a back up book that has not been started when I get on a plane. One and a spare . The California Column book and the Jackson book will be my plane books.



 Posted: Tue Jun 2nd, 2009 11:29 pm
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CleburneFan
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Susan, I just read "American Lion" in February. I got about 2/3 of the way through and gave up. Yes, Jackson had an interesting life, but for some reason I lost interest in it and decided to find a book I'd like better.

I SHOULD have enjoyed the book being as Jackson lived near Nashville at the Hermitage. Anyway, I tried to like the book, but didn't. Maybe it was the writer's style. I am not sure.



 Posted: Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 02:27 pm
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susansweet3
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Oh no!!  I have always liked Jackson.  I read Robert Remini's bio of Jackson years ago and loved it which is the reason I bought this one.   Think I will rethink reading it now and not be lugging it around as I travel.  Choose something else.  Back to bookshelf.



 Posted: Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 02:36 pm
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javal1
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Fan,

It's not you, it's the author. Meacham is one of the dryest writers I've ever attempted to read. I attempted his "An Intimate Portrait of an Epic Friendship", about Roosevelt & Churchill and only lasted about 100 pages. If you ever see an interview with him, he speaks dry as well. Think he's the editor of Newsweek.

BTW, I'm reading "The Shiloh Campaign" edited by Woodworth. It's one of those collections of essays which I'm not generally not a fan of. Will do a mini-review when through.



 Posted: Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 03:11 pm
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susansweet3
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Wish I had asked you two about the book before I bought it . Oh well



 Posted: Wed Jun 3rd, 2009 11:47 pm
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CleburneFan
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Javal and Susan, the book is very dry, just as Javal said. I can take pretty dry writing, but this was over the top. Still, Susan, don't give up on the book just because of me.

Or look at the pictures in it anyway. I found them more interesting than the book itself.:D



 Posted: Thu Jun 4th, 2009 02:22 pm
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Captain Crow
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Susan Have you read 'Patriotic Fire" by Winston Groom? While mainly focusing on the battle of New Orleans...it does provide some good background on Jackson as well as Lafite. And his writing is anything but dry.....makes me wish he would do a full biography on Old hickory.



 Posted: Fri Jun 5th, 2009 09:22 pm
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susansweet3
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I have not read that Groom book.  I have read Robert Remini 's  book on Jackson and enjoyed it and years ago in college our text for the Age of Jackson was a book by Wellman about the Age of Jackson.  I don't always agree with what Jackson did but the man amazes me at what all he did. I also love the Hermitage.  My mother went there in the 1930's .  She would talk about it all the time as I was growing up.  She had a small match holder that was shaped like a goblet that was carved out of the cedar at the Hermitage.  I use to look at it alot on our mantle and wonder about the place.  When I started traveling cross country it was one of the places I went.  The gentleman in the gift shop told me those were carved by an old man who had been a slave on the plantation from the actual trees there.  He said they are valuable collectors items.  I have it still but would never get rid of it , it was my mother's prize treasure . 

I am not giving up on the book.  Another friend said he really liked the book .  Just not taking it to Kentucky with me.  Decided to take my book on the California Column in Arizona to read. 

Susan



 Posted: Wed Nov 25th, 2009 03:15 pm
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susansweet3
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I just finished a non Civil War book I would recommend to anyone interested in the West  or Teddy Roosevelt .  It is called the Big Burn  by Timothy Egan.  It is the story of the huge forest fire in 1910 that is considered the biggest ever .  It covered three states with fire .  The smoke was seen five miles out to sea in the Atlantic. 

The story is about the beginnings of the Ranger service and how they dealt with the fire.  It is an amazing read.



 Posted: Wed Nov 25th, 2009 04:37 pm
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Old North State
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I heard him speak about the book in Seattle recently.  I agree with Susan, it's a fascinating story!



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 Posted: Fri Nov 27th, 2009 04:25 pm
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susansweet3
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Old North , after reading the Big Burn I looked to see what else he has written and have three other of his books on my wish list .  He has written about the Dust Bowl which is another period of American history that is of interest to me since I read Grapes of Wrath years ago .

Lucky you to have heard him talk. 

Susan



 Posted: Mon Nov 30th, 2009 11:35 am
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Old Blu
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Just finished Robertson's book 'A.P. Hill'.



 Posted: Mon Nov 30th, 2009 03:25 pm
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susansweet3
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I reallly liked that book on A. P. Hill.  I read it and then Robertson's book on Stonewall Jackson both last summer .



 Posted: Fri Mar 26th, 2010 02:50 pm
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I just finished reading "The Name of the Wind" by Patrick Rothfuss. Really wonderful! Looking forward to the second book!!



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 Posted: Sat Mar 27th, 2010 07:34 pm
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Doc C
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In the midst of Chesapeake. Great book for me since I live there and 10 minutes from where Michener wrote it and the central town - Cambridge, Md.

Doc C



 Posted: Sat Mar 27th, 2010 08:00 pm
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susansweet3
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Doc I bought that book on St. Michael's Island and read it while visiting relatives in Annapolis many many years ago .  I loved it .  I use to love reading Michner . 

Susan



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