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 Posted: Fri Dec 19th, 2008 04:37 am
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susansweet2
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I have spent the last couple of days in the Knoxville area with friends.  We did a driving tour of the Knoxville siege and battle yesterday.  I found a copy of a tour route on line done by the Knoxville Round table. 

I loved going up the hill and exploring Fort Dickerson .  It is isolated from the main part of the city so is in pretty good condition .  I was standing there in the misty rainy weather trying to imagine Wheeler charging up the hill and being replused. 

We stopped off at three of the houses that were part of the battles but all three were not open.  The Bleak House did have the Anchor and chain out side on the ground.  The anchor is made of a railroad rail bent in the shape of an anchor.  The chain is hand forged.  They were used to anchor a pontoon bridge and to keep the Confederates from sending a barge down river to crash into the bridge.  They were found several years ago at the bottom of the Loudon.  The tower of the house was where Confederate Sharpshooters were stationed.  One of them is said to have killed General Sanders a Union officer from Mississippi , cousin of Jefferson Davis , career officer who stayed with the Union .

The Confederate cemetery was locked up and hard to even see from the outside.  The National cemetery has a nice monument to the soldier of Tennesse that fought there .   Here I was wandering around in eventually pouring rain. 

Many sites are marked only by plaques.  As Sarah Vowel in her book would say I was Seward plaqued.   (She had taken a friend to see this wonderful site  which turned out to only be a plaque that said the house where Seward lived use to be on this site.  )

My friend who was driving me around must think I am crazy when I do such things as make him pull into a church parking lot as suggested on the driving tour to see where the Confederates had considered a charge that would have been longer than Pickett's charge up a well fortified hill.  With the rain and foggy type conditions it was hard to see in the distance but interesting to think about what might have been.

I read about Fort Sanders named for the General killed.  Sadly there is not anything left of this fort  except monuments and a sign. 

Does anyone know of a good book on the siege of Knoxville? 

Susan

We also went out to Campbell's Station but nothing is left there but some dug pieces in the local museum which also holds an interesting Farragut collection as he was born near by .  The town is now named for him. 

 



 Posted: Fri Dec 19th, 2008 02:16 pm
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The Iron Duke
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I haven't read this yet but it does have a section on Knoxville.

http://www.amazon.com/Confederate-Struggle-Command-Longstreet-University/dp/1603440526/ref=pd_bbs_sr_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1229699679&sr=8-6



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"Cleburne is here!" meant that all was well. -Daniel Harvey Hill


 Posted: Sat Jan 10th, 2009 01:25 am
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dw@cwba
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"Divided Loyalties: Fort Sanders and the Civil War in East Tennessee" by Digby Gordon Seymour. I would recommend the 2nd edition. 





Last edited on Sat Jan 10th, 2009 01:26 am by dw@cwba



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