Civil War Interactive Discussion Board Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register


John Bell Hood Website - John Bell Hood - The Participants of the War - Mikitary & Civilian - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
 Moderated by: javal1 Page:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  
 New Topic   Reply   Printer Friendly 
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Tue Feb 14th, 2006 06:34 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
1st Post
javal1
Grumpy Geezer


Joined: Thu Sep 1st, 2005
Location: Tennessee USA
Posts: 1503
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Wow! Somehow through all my searching for good quality websites, I never saw this one before. True, it's about a man who I have no admiration for (realizing others disagree strongly!), but it's a gorgeous site that's extremely well researched. We'll add it to LinkCentral next update, but I thought I'd share it in the meantime:

http://www.johnbellhood.org/index.htm



 Posted: Thu Feb 16th, 2006 10:31 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
2nd Post
Kent Nielsen
Member
 

Joined: Wed Dec 14th, 2005
Location: Calgary, Alberta Canada
Posts: 76
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

It looks like a well designed website. I added it to my favourites list. But to be honest I'm wondering we're going to be seeing Gideon Pillow and Sterling Price websites next.:)



 Posted: Fri Feb 17th, 2006 02:38 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
3rd Post
David White
Member


Joined: Tue Sep 6th, 2005
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 909
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I think you could have some fun creating a Gideon Pillow website; you could open it with a flash screen showing him fleeing Ft. Donelson in a row boat.  Then announce in bold letters:  Gideon Pillow, Presidential law partner, Major General USA, Brigadier General, CSA...  Apparently the Confederacy was a better judge of character.  Then you could have chapters like “Bad boy gets coal in his stocking” talking about him getting sued for confiscating the coal company’s assets during the Civil War or “Pillow fight results in reassignment of Winfield Scott,”  talking about Scott’s and Pillow’s feud after the Mexican War.



 Posted: Thu Feb 23rd, 2006 04:27 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
4th Post
samhood
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 6th, 2005
Location: West Virginia USA
Posts: 55
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Thanks for the kind words about the John Bell Hood website(s).  http://www.johnbellhood.org and http://www.hoodslasthurrah.com   I realize that many Civil Warriors have little admiration for Gen. Hood, but these websites try to tackle the causes of Hood's soiled legacy.  Like all CW commanders, Hood had his faults and made mistakes, but many of his words and deeds have been mischaracterized, and in many cases important credible historical information has been concealed from the general public by biased authors and historians.  The websites provide a lot of pertinent information that may change some open minds.

Gideon Pillow and Sterling Price didn't save Richmond at Gaines' Mill; route Duryee's Zuoaves at Second Manassas; hold Lee's left flank at Miller's Cornfield at Antietam; lose an arm at Gettysburg; lose a leg leading the Confederate breakthrough at the Brotherton Cabin at Chickamauga; hold Atlanta for 45 days; and come within a whisker of bagging Schofield at Spring Hill and then again at Franklin. 

The JB Hood websites honor his service and accomplishments, and provides him a well-deserved defense of his many criticisms and condemnations. 



 Posted: Mon Feb 27th, 2006 11:35 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
5th Post
GenHood
Member


Joined: Mon Sep 5th, 2005
Location: Urbana, Illinois USA
Posts: 32
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Surprise!  I love this site, as well as my membership in the John Bell Hood Historical Society.  A visit to the site will definitely cause folks to rethink their position on J.B. Hood, the soldier as well as the man, and perhaps even bring about a change in attitude towards the General and his military and personal experiences.  On top of that, it's one of the more aesthetically pleasing websites you'll ever visit. 



 Posted: Tue Feb 28th, 2006 06:03 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
6th Post
connyankee
Member


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2005
Location: Colchester, Connecticut USA
Posts: 83
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I stumbled upon the Hood website about a year ago and was impressed with it's content.  Note the link to a review of Wiley Sword's "The Confederacy's Last Hurrah" which is interesting and about a book that I purchased last April while "following Hood's army" from Mt. Pleasant to Nashville.  This was a fun trip and full of discoveries.  I had always been confused about the movements of the armies during this campaign until I took the trip myself!

Never A Hood fan, nonetheless, a better understanding of the man is greatly appreciated.  Same thing can be said of me about Stonewall, yet I own more books and other material about Jackson than any other figure.

I also found these websites quite helpful if anyone wants to make this self-guided tour sometime-

Tennessee's Civil War Heritage Trail:

http://www.state.tn.us/environment/hist/PathDivided/index.html

Virtual Tour of the AOT's 1864 Campaign:

http://www.civilwarweb.com/articles/04-99/vtour1.htm

:) connyankee

 



 Posted: Tue Feb 28th, 2006 07:46 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
7th Post
GenHood
Member


Joined: Mon Sep 5th, 2005
Location: Urbana, Illinois USA
Posts: 32
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Thanks for the links.  A few years ago a friend and I "followed Hood's army"  from Huntsville AL to Franklin.  It was a lot of fun and definitely a learning experience, although a little sad to try and picture the terrain as it was in the face of all the development.



You have chosen to ignore Savez. click Here to view this post


 Posted: Sat Apr 22nd, 2006 04:09 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
9th Post
samhood
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 6th, 2005
Location: West Virginia USA
Posts: 55
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Savez:

   The http://www.johnbellhood.org website is not necessarily intended to be fair and balanced, rather, it IS the balance that is absent in the unbalanced fact-filtered books by Wiley Sword, James L. McDonough and the late Thomas Connelly.  Anyone studying Hood and the 1864 TN Campaign and wants to get all the historical evidence on Hood (and who shouldn't?) should read Sword's book to get everything negative ever said about Hood, and refer to the Johnbellhood.org website to get what was said positive about Hood.

    By the way, as author of the Johnbellhood.org website, I would appreciate your telling me exactly where in the approximately 200 pages of historical text have I made any factual errors, or editorial analysis that is unreasonable.  I will immediately correct any error.

    Finally, if the Army of Tennessee were indeed destroyed in 1864, it was William T. Sherman, John M. Schofield and George Thomas that did it.



 Posted: Sat Apr 22nd, 2006 05:06 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
10th Post
javal1
Grumpy Geezer


Joined: Thu Sep 1st, 2005
Location: Tennessee USA
Posts: 1503
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Sam,

I would highly recommend Of Cause and Of Country: the Saga of Spring Hill and Franklin to you. I think you'll find the treatment of Hood's performance much more objective. Perhaps not complimentary, but certainly fairer than Sword's diatribe. I really think in time this will become the authorative book on Franklin.



 Posted: Sat Apr 22nd, 2006 07:30 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
11th Post
samhood
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 6th, 2005
Location: West Virginia USA
Posts: 55
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

javal1:

Thanks.  Actually I assisted the author, Eric Jacobson, over the past few years while he was researching and writing the book.  I read the manuscript several weeks ago, and am looking forward to reading the finished product, which, ironically, arrived in the mail today!

I can't agree more with your brief assessment.  It is much more objective in its treatment of not only Gen. Hood, but all other primary characters as well.  Unlike Wiley Sword, Eric clearly has no ax to grind, and does not conceal historical evidence that doesn't support his premise.  For Cause and For Country is surely no hagiography of Gen. Hood, nor should it be, but Eric has made a bona fide effort to seperate fact from conjecture and fiction;  the first book on the subject since Thomas Hay's 1929 Hood's Tennessee Campaign to do so.

When I finish the book, I will post a more complete review on CWI .

Thanks again.



 Posted: Sat Apr 22nd, 2006 10:47 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
12th Post
susansweet2
Member
 

Joined: Thu Feb 9th, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 98
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Sam , excuse my ignorance but could you explain the ax to grind that Wiley Sword had in his book?   We read the book in book group at the Drum Barracks last year.  Several people who are very knowledgable about the war said it had some omissions etc. We also read Shrouds of Glory and The Stonewall of the West.   It was interesting the two differet sides in those two books. 

Thanks for any information you can give me .

 



 Posted: Sat Apr 22nd, 2006 11:22 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
13th Post
samhood
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 6th, 2005
Location: West Virginia USA
Posts: 55
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Susansweet2:

    Glad to ma'am. 

    Please go to http://www.hoodslasthurrah.com/two.htm where I have written a 5,000 word review of Sword's The Confederacy's Last Hurrah.  The review chronicles, in detail, Sword's numerous errors, omissions, misrepresentations, and half-truths in regards to Gen. Hood.

    There are many other errors and misrepresentations by Sword that I did not include; some that I thought might be over-kill (although Sword didn't hold back on over-killing Gen. Hood), and others that I didn't discover until recently, such as Sword's undeniably incorrect Confederate casualty figures for the Tennessee Campaign.

     I am sincerely impressed with your desire to make your own independent assessment of Gen. Hood's conduct of the Tennessee Campaign.  Sword's literary skills are so eloquent and mesmerizing that it is difficult to be skeptical of his historiography.



You have chosen to ignore Eric. click Here to view this post


 Posted: Tue Apr 25th, 2006 04:51 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
15th Post
susansweet2
Member
 

Joined: Thu Feb 9th, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 98
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Sam , thanks for the information.  One of our bookgroup is a member of the John Bell Hood SVC here in Southern California.  He shared some of the information when we read the book.  I had forgotten about that.  I will read the information . 



You have chosen to ignore Eric. click Here to view this post


 Posted: Tue Apr 25th, 2006 02:55 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
17th Post
javal1
Grumpy Geezer


Joined: Thu Sep 1st, 2005
Location: Tennessee USA
Posts: 1503
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Eric - it's really good to have you aboard. For those who haven't ordered Eric's book, you can do so here.

One of the things I loved about it is the great detail you went into regarding Spring Hill. In fact, this easily could have been two books, one on each of the battles. I've told you on the phone, and I don't mind saying it here, that this is THE best book on Franklin I've read (and I've read them all!) Great job....



You have chosen to ignore Savez. click Here to view this post


 Posted: Tue Apr 25th, 2006 08:09 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
19th Post
samhood
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 6th, 2005
Location: West Virginia USA
Posts: 55
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Savez:

     I am sure the approx. 2,500 Union soldiers killed and wounded at Nashville would contend that they were not shot up by an opposing army that had been destroyed two weeks earlier.  And the 15,000 Confederate casualty number that you (and Eric Jacobson) cite includes approximately 5,000-6,000 Confederate desertions during the retreat.  I don't think that desertions are typically counted as casualties by modern scholars.  Hood's casualties in killed, wounded, missing and captured were probably closer to 10,000, which is about 28%...a percentage only slightly higher than the 20 largest Civil War campaigns.  I will concede that desertions are the responsibility of the commander, but for the purposes of calculating "casualties" should be considered seperately.  I will agree that the Army of Tennessee was decisively defeated at Franklin and Nashville, but it was not destroyed there.  The destruction, if there was one, began at Dalton in the spring of 64, and was completed at Bentonville.   

     I will not enter a debate over the "stupidity" of the assault at Franklin or the Nashville investment in this forum, when the reasoning for Hood's decisions are explained in detail at my http://www.hoodslasthurrah.com/one.htm web page, and even greater detail in Eric Jacobson's new book.  (Or at least the Franklin decision.)  Franklin was a terrible bloodbath for sure, but was only one of several tragedies in the War.

    Hood did indeed lay a lot of blame on Hardee after the fall of Atlanta, some probably unwarranted, but some probably legitimate.  He also observed that the troops, under Johnston, had become unwilling to fight outside of breastworks, which may or may not have been true, but even if so, would have been understandable.  However, Hood wasn't alone in making such comments, and similar quotes by some other Civil War commanders are detailed on my web page, although these other commanders seem to escape the ire of modern authors and scholars.

A couple of items I haven't yet inserted into my site text (I'm past due for an update)...  

Regarding Hood's assault at Franklin, one quote that I haven't yet inserted into my site text comes from William T Sherman, commenting in the OR on his attack at Kennesaw, "...I perceived that the enemy and our own officers had settled down
to the conviction that I would not assault fortified lines.  All looked to me to outflank
...An army to be efficient must not settle down to a single mode of offence, but must be prepared to execute any plan which promises success.  I wanted, therefore, for the moral effect, to make a successful assault against the enemy behind his breastworks, and resolved to attempt it at that point where success would give the largest fruits of victory."  Hood said something similar about Franklin, and is harshly condemned, while Sherman avoids criticism of most authors for saying essentially the same thing. 

Another related point...Hood is accused of blaming the army for the loss at Jonesboro, commenting that the relatively low CS casualties at that battle indicated a lack of aggressiveness.  In fact he was simply repeating SD Lee's OR on Jonesboro almost ver batim.  But again citing Sherman, "At times assaults [on Kennesaw] are necessary and inevitable....Had we broken his line today it would have been most decisive, as it is our loss is small compared with some of those East."  This rather callous, albeit statistically accurate, rationalization by Sherman escapes condemnation of many scholars.  Had Hood said something similar, he would have been condemned.  The only comparison that Hood made between Franklin and "back East" was in his postwar memoirs, "The attack (at Franklin), which entailed so great a sacrifice of life, had become a necessity as imperative as that which impelled Gen. Lee to order the assault at Gaines’ Mill, when our troops charged across an open space, a distance of one mile, under a most galling fire of musketry and artillery, against an enemy heavily entrenched. The heroes in that action fought not more gallantly than the soldiers of the Army of Tennessee upon the fields of Franklin."  Unfortunately, although Hood's memoirs are cited substantially in all the books on the Tennessee Campaign, this quote of high praise by Hood for the soldiers of the Army of Tennessee appears nowhere (not even in Eric's outstanding new book.)    

Last edited on Tue Apr 25th, 2006 10:53 pm by samhood



You have chosen to ignore Eric. click Here to view this post


 Current time is 03:51 pmPage:    1  2  Next Page Last Page  
Top




UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.4721 seconds (26% database + 74% PHP). 31 queries executed.