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 Posted: Fri Dec 4th, 2009 05:43 pm
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susansweet3
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Fuller where have you been????? I was wondering about you the other day.  Glad to see you back posting .



 Posted: Fri Dec 4th, 2009 07:53 pm
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TimK
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First, what is the difference between Lebanon bologna and regular deli bologna? I think I saw something on the Food Network about a fried bologna sandwich (maybe a diner that specialized in the sandwich?), but the thought didn't hold my interest. To each his own, but it doesn't sound that tasty to me. I've never much cared for bologna.

I had goose once a few years ago. I guess it tasted okay, but I thought it was very greasy. I don't know enough about it to know if that is because of the way it was prepared, or if it is just a naturally greasy bird. I've never had duck. My brother had a turducken(?) for Thanksgiving last year, but didn't like it. He called it turdyucken.



 Posted: Fri Dec 4th, 2009 08:10 pm
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javal1
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Tim,

To me Lebanon Bolgna is a misnomer. What it actually is a a slowly smoked sausage., with lots of spices....let me see if I can find something.....Ok, here ya go:

Originating with the Pennsylvania Dutch, Lebanon bologna was developed with heavy influence coming from slow-cured sausages of Europe. It it is commonly available throughout Pennsylvania and is often served as a luncheon meat. It is named for the Lebanon Valley of Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, where it is most commonly produced. There are two versions, original and sweet.

The thermal processing of Lebanon bologna typically does not exceed 120oF (48.8oC) due to undesirable quality effects high heat has on the final product. Because it is not cooked to a higher temperature, other ingredients and processes are used to control microbial growth. [1] Fermenting the product to a low pH coupled with the inclusion of curing salts inhibits the outgrowth of pathogenic bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, as well as spoilage organisms.

Typically, the blended and stuffed beef sausage is aged for 10 days prior to smoking to enrich lactic acid bacteria and allow for the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. [2] Fermentation occurs during the smoking step, which can last for up to 4 days. [3] A 1 pH unit (or more) decline is observed during this step, as well as the development of nitrosohemochrome, the pigment responsible for the red color of cured meats.

Sometimes cream cheese is spread onto slices of Lebanon bologna, rolled and then cut into small sections, and served as an appetizer. Lebanon bologna can also be fried.

In short - Lebanon Bologna actually has a taste, unlike what we call bologna.

 



 Posted: Fri Dec 4th, 2009 08:49 pm
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TimK
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Well there you go. I learned something new today. I would try that. I like sausages, although I would prefer not to hear how they're made. Joe - how do you get a Pennsylvania specialty in rural Tennessee? Do you get it shipped down with your Tastykakes?

Next - what are steamers? And I always thought babaganouche was just a fun word to say. I never knew you could eat it.



 Posted: Fri Dec 4th, 2009 08:53 pm
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pamc153PA
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Yep, the Lebanon bologna with cream cheese rolls are always one of my mom's appetizers at Christmas.

Tim, if you think Oscar Mayer when you think bologna, then you're not thinking Lebanon bologna. Joe's info was correct, and so was his opinion: Lebanon bologna actually has a taste to it!

For me, it was a spate of Lebanon bologna and mustard on white (Wonder) bread sandwiches for my lunch at school when I was a kid. I think my mom was all for it because Lebanon bologna was cheaper than ham. This was the same time I developed a taste for chipped dried beef, straight, not in dried beef gravy or anything like that. I still sometimes splurge (oh, the massive amounts of salt!!) on a quarter pound for myself, and still eat it straight.

Steamers, Tim, are what we around Philly call steamed clams, cherrystones, the little sweet ones. Used to be a bar at college where you could get a dozen steamers and a beer for a buck on Thursday nights.

As for the goose, I think I'll pass on it.

Pam

Last edited on Fri Dec 4th, 2009 08:55 pm by pamc153PA



 Posted: Fri Dec 4th, 2009 09:31 pm
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javal1
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Tim,

As I told Pam in a PM a few weeks ago, I hadn't seen Lebanon Bologna since I moved here in 1996. I had given up on it. About a month ago I went to a butcher/deli in Paris, TN because it's the only place I can get good Blue Cheese. There in the counter was a beautiful bounty of Lebanon Bologna. I was shocked and promptly bought 3 pounds. I'm about out now, so I'll be making the 60 mile round trip for a new batch. Alas, as for Tastykake -, no joy. The have some horrible thing here called Little Debbie's which is basically various shaped sugar cubes.

Pam: You like Lebanon, steamers and chipped beef straight. We were meant to be together :P  If hubby's reading over your shoulder...It's a joke!!



 Posted: Fri Dec 4th, 2009 11:31 pm
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pamc153PA
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Joe, I can safely say that no one's ever said that to me before. . .for those reasons! :D

Pam



 Posted: Sat Dec 5th, 2009 12:58 am
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Doc C
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Pardon, I misunderstood. You meant meant Lebanon as Pa vs Lebanon as middle eastern. Mia culpa.

Doc C

Last edited on Sat Dec 5th, 2009 12:59 am by Doc C



 Posted: Sat Dec 5th, 2009 01:41 am
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pamc153PA
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That's okay, Doc. You got me thinking about hummus and babaganoush and taboule, which I haven't had in ages! Pitas and hummus with some really good olive oil. . .

Pam



 Posted: Sat Dec 5th, 2009 02:42 am
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Doc C
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DC, Baltimore & Annapolis has a great middle eastern chain called lebanese taverna - incredible whole grilled rock fish.



 Posted: Sat Dec 5th, 2009 03:31 pm
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TimK
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I wasn't kidding when I said I didn't know what babagaoush is, so I Googled it. Its eggplant. Pass!



 Posted: Sat Dec 5th, 2009 03:34 pm
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pamc153PA
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It doesn't taste like eggplant, tho, Tim. It's roasted egplant, tahini (sesame paste) and olive oil and spices all pureed together. It tastes smoky and spicy, more than like eggplant. But if you're not an eggplant person to begin with, it might be a little much.

Pam

 



 Posted: Sat Dec 5th, 2009 03:51 pm
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TimK
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If you invited me over to your house for dinner (I think Joe wants to come, too), and fried Lebanon Bologna sandwiches and babganoush was on the menu, I would eat it and I'm sure I would enjoy it. Just please don't tell me what I'm eating.

BTW - it is supposed to be about 20 degrees with flurries here tomorrow. An absolute perfect day for Soup Sunday. If anyone wants to come over and warm their chilled bones with whatever soup my wife makes, feel free. I'll just be in front of the television and fireplace watching football soaking in the aromas.



 Posted: Sat Dec 5th, 2009 07:54 pm
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ole
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A goose is greasy. It has to be roasted on a rack twice. And it is a waste of time to stuff them ... the stuffing will drip grease. Roast it 3/4 done; pour off the grease, roast it again. But save the grease for tomorrow's hash browns.

Ole



 Posted: Sun Dec 6th, 2009 10:14 am
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fedreb
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I have been reading this thread with some incredulity....never before had I heard of deep frying a whole turkey, sounds awesome! I had to google it to see what kit is required, those fryers look like a dustbin on a camp stove. I will have to try doing that some day, does it come under the heading of cooking or does the danger aspect make it exteme sports?



 Posted: Sun Dec 6th, 2009 06:35 pm
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pamc153PA
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Fedreb, I think it falls more under extreme sports. I have never deep fried a whole turkey myself, but I have heard of turkeys exploding in the process, so part of what you'll need would be goggles and maybe some chain mail!

Pam



 Posted: Sun Dec 6th, 2009 06:35 pm
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pamc153PA
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So Tim, what kind of soup is it today?

Pam



 Posted: Mon Dec 7th, 2009 02:29 pm
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TimK
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Nothing real special - I made my turkey chile and some homemade corn muffins.

Deep frying a turkey can be dangerous if you're stupid about it. Most accidents happen when you use too much oil, so that when you put the bird in, it overflows. Best to figure this out first. Another problem can happen if the bird is wet when you put it in. When we brined our turkey, we spent a good half hour taking turns making sure there was no water in or on it before frying. It's pretty much a matter of common sense.



 Posted: Mon Dec 7th, 2009 03:43 pm
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Fuller
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Fried turkey is well worth trying. Use peanut oil. Ours came out nice and black. We heard several people comment that it was the best turkey they ever had. The only draw back is there are no drippings to make a gravy.

I guess there are reports of people putting a frozen turkey in the hot oil?!!! Nice explosions of fire balls.

We fried ours out back with a fryer specified for frying turkeys, fueled by a propane tank waaaay far out from the house. Our chickens (live ones) came pecking over to have a horrified look. They were quickly escorted back to their coop before we had some KFC as well!



 Posted: Thu Feb 11th, 2010 10:54 pm
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ole
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Time to resurrect the thread.

For Christmas, we just set up a taco bar. All the fixins. Feed yourselves. And we did.

Ole



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