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1864 Red River - Other Western Theater and Trans-Miss. - Civil War Talk - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
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 Posted: Sun Mar 26th, 2006 04:57 pm
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JeremyScott
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I would like to find out some information about the Red River Campaign. I had two ancestors that fought there, but really cant find all that much on it. I know it centered around a large plantation and there was a huge river battle. But thats about all I know. Any help would be greatly appreciated.



 Posted: Mon Mar 27th, 2006 01:47 am
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Basecat
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Jeremy,

Have yet to read this book, but have heard it is a pretty decent history of the Red River Campaign.  The book is One Damn Blunder From Beginning to End: The Red River Campaign of 1864 by Gary Dilliard Joiner.  It was published in 2003, and is book 11 in the American Crisis Series: Books on the Civil War Era from SR books.  They also have a website, and that addy is:

http://www.rowmanlittlefield.com/srbooks/

Hope that helps.

Regards from the Garden State,

Steve Basic

Last edited on Mon Mar 27th, 2006 02:08 am by Basecat



 Posted: Tue Mar 28th, 2006 01:15 am
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susansweet2
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Civil War in the American West (Vintage Civil War Library) (Paperback)
by Alvin M. Jr Josephy
This is a book the book discussion group I belong to read a a few months ago.  I had a chapter or two on the Red River campaign.  We all agreeded it was an interesting book.  You won't get the detail of the other book suggested but it might get you started. 

Good luck on finding more information.  Hope you find what you are looking for. 

I find everytime I read one book it leads me to another question which leads to another book.  Does anyone else have this problem? 

 



 Posted: Tue May 2nd, 2006 08:02 pm
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Richard Taylor
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Unfortunately, there hasn't been a great deal of writing about the Red River campaign. Ludwell Johnson's book from the 50's hasn't really been improved upon. Studies since then have generally been summaries that don't really add much to Johnson's book. Joiner's book is better than most of the other's as he does add some new insight, but a detailed tactical history of the campaign is yet to be written. One of the few bright spots in Red River histiography has been the volume of the Civil War Regiments journal by Savas. It has been reprinted as a stand alone book and has some great essays in there. There's a few decent regimental histories that touch on the campaign.

Do you know what regiments your ancestors served in?



 Posted: Wed Oct 4th, 2006 01:15 am
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Doc C
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A relatively new book out may shed a little light on the Red River Campaign.  Ancestor of mine, Pikney Cone, served in the CMB throughout the Vicksburg and Red River Campaigns.  Captured during the RRC and sent to Camp Ford in Tyler, Tx where he spent the remainder of the war.  Even though I grew up and lived near there for many years, it was wasn't in my realm of interest at the time but have a contact also from Louisiana who could possiblly help.


Chicago's Battery Boys

The Chicago Mercantile Battery in the American Civil War

by Rick Williams
 
 
 
 



 Posted: Wed Oct 4th, 2006 02:34 am
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connyankee
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I read Joiner's book not too long ago and I thought it very good.  It's a relatively short read - less than 200 pages w/footnotes at the end of every chapter, maps and pics.  I really don't have anything similar to compare it to though.  It was Banks last command and a failure at that.  He had just won the Thanks of Congress for something  I can't even remember.  What a loser. :X 



 Posted: Wed Oct 4th, 2006 08:10 pm
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James Longstreet
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In my school's text book, the Red River campaign is referred to as a "draw"...Maybe I am way off, but I was pretty sure this was a solid Confederate victory.



 Posted: Wed Oct 4th, 2006 11:18 pm
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Doc C
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the only draw about it was that the union troops withdrew to Alexandria with their tails between their legs.

 

Doc C



 Posted: Fri Oct 13th, 2006 12:13 pm
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Kent Nielsen
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Hi There is also a book on the campaign titled "Disaster In Damp Sand: The Red River Expedition" by Curt Anders which was published 1n 1997-98 by the Guild Press of Indiana. I haven't read it but the two online revews I read both complimented the book. 



 Posted: Sat Apr 7th, 2007 01:41 am
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Texas Defender
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   General Banks received the Thanks of Congress for the capture of Port Hudson.

   During Banks' ill-fated Red River Campaign, Admiral Porter's ships were saved by Joseph Bailey with his: "Wing dam" idea.

Dead in the Water, Rough Ride on the Red River (Essay)

   For this accomplishment, Joseph Bailey was also given the Thanks of Congress.

   General Sherman was the only man to receive that honor twice during the war.



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 Posted: Tue Sep 15th, 2009 11:34 am
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Colonel Coffee
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General Nathaniel P. Banks and 30,000 federal troops attempted to fight their way up the Red River from New Orleans but were turned back by less than 12,000 Confederate troops of Lt. Gen. Richard Taylor. The plan was that of Union General-in-Chief Henry Halleck.

The goal of the Camden Expedition from Little Rock and the Red River Campaign from New Orleans was to combine the 30,000 man army of Gen. Banks with 15,000 troops under Gen. Frederick Steele and invade northeast Texas. Steele failed to get through due to heavy rain in southern Arkansas and was met by the forces of General Sterling Price and units from Gen. Taylor. Gen. Samuel Bell Maxey and the Texas Cavalry Brigade from north Texas and Indian Territory led by Col. Richard M. Gano also played a key role in the defeat of Gen. Steele. The highly mobile Texas Cavalry Brigade protected Gen. Price along the Line Road which ran down the Arkansas-Indian Territory border to Lanesport Arkansas on the Red River. Gano's mobile forces also   defended against an invasion of north Texas through Indian Territory on the Texas Road from Little Rock, Fort Gibson and Fort Scott Kansas.

 The Red River Campaign and the Camden Expediton was a brilliant Confederate victory and caused the Union forces in New Orleans to make an attempt to invade Texas from the Gulf of Mexico. That attempt was also a failure and was concluded with a Confederate victory at the  battle of Palminto Ranch in May 1865.

My great grandfather was  in Capt. John Henry Damron's  Spy Company (Co.C), Lt. Col. Peter C. Hardeman's/ Major Michael Looscan's and Col. T.C. Hawpe's  1st/31st  Texas Cavalry Consolidated Regiment  of Col. Richard Montgomery Gano's Texas Cavalry Brigade in  Gen. Samuel Bell Maxey's Division.  The 1st/31st Texas Cavalry regiment saw action at Poison Springs, Massard's Prairie and  2nd Battle of Cabin Creek in Indian Territory with Col. Gano and Col. Stand Watie in command of the  Confederate forces.  After the war, Capt. Damron and my great grandfather married sisters and moved to the frontier in west Texas in order to escape the post-war strife in northeast Texas.    

After Lee surrendered at Appomatox, Gen. Sheridan put his headquarters in New Orleans because he was still  afraid of Texas and knew they were not whipped. Aware of the sentiment in Texas, Sheridan sent Colonel George A. Custer to the "Deaf and Dumb School"  at the University of Texas in Austin to accept the surrender of Texas Confederates. Sheridan felt that Custer was expendable and indeed he was.

Last edited on Tue Sep 15th, 2009 11:58 am by Colonel Coffee



 Posted: Wed Oct 21st, 2009 05:03 am
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maccars
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Read Thomas Ayres, Dark and Bloody Ground, Taylor Trade Publishing, 2001. A very good read, however, unannotated.  I obtained my copy from the bookstore at the Visitor's Center for the Mansfield Battlefield Park, just outside of Mansfield, LA.



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 Posted: Mon Feb 15th, 2010 04:12 am
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spoofseeker
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Also look into the "Sabine Crossroads" You'll find even more info on he Red River Campaign. I did a paranormal Investigation with my group at Pleasant Hill. Give me a holler I'll be happy to hand over all the research amterials we found on the entire campaign

Last edited on Mon Feb 15th, 2010 04:15 am by spoofseeker



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