Civil War Interactive Discussion Board Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register


A.P. HILLS LIGHT DIVISION - Other People of the Civil War - The Participants of the War - Mikitary & Civilian - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
 Moderated by: javal1 Page:    1  2  3  4  Next Page Last Page  
 New Topic   Reply   Printer Friendly 
 Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Sun Jul 3rd, 2011 02:39 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
1st Post
pender
Member


Joined: Wed Jun 8th, 2011
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 148
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

A.P. Hills division formed in mid June 1862. Many historians have called this division Lees shock troops. Bringing on the Seven Days Battle. Also saving Jacksons command at Cedar Mountain, And taking the brunt of the waves of men Pope sent against Jacksons lines at Second Manassas. Thier attack at Chantilly or Ox Hill, Thier role in taking Harpers Ferry. Then they saved the confederate army at Sharpsburg. At Fredricksburg it was the gap in thier lines that Meades brigades was able to penetrate. The light division taking some of the highest confederate casualties at Fredricksburg. They were on Jacksons great flanking march at Chancellorsville, and in the brunt of the next days fighting. It was the light divison that pushed the union troops through the streets of Gettysburg the first day, and on the third day as remnants awaiting for the assault on the center.When Lee passed by and saw thier condition of the first days battle, He said These men should not make this charge, they should be sent too the rear. After Gettysburg they were in the Overland Campaign, the siege of Petersburg, and were in the firing of the last shots at Appomattox. The division commanders were A.P.Hill, William D.Pender and Cadmus M.Wilcox. The division was changed some after Jacksons death, Archers and Brockenbroughs brigades were given to Heths divison. The organization of A.P.Hills light division in 1862 was, First Brigade, Brig. Gen. C.W. Field, 40th,47th,55th,60th Virginia. Second Brigade, Brig. Gen. Maxcy Gregg, 1st,12th,13th,14th,South Carolina.1st South Carolina Rifles. Third Brigade, Brig. Gen. Joseph R.Anderson, 14th,35th,45th,49th Georgia.3rd Louisiana Battalion. Fourth Brigade, Brig. Gen. L.O'B. Branch, 7th,18th,28th,33rd,37th North Carolina. Fifth Brigade, Brig. Gen. J.J. Archer, 5th Alabama Battalion, 19th Georgia, 1st,7th,14th Tennessee. Sixth Brigade, Brig. Gen. William D. Pender, 16th,22nd,34th,38th North Carolina. 22nd Virginia Battalion. ARTILLERY: Liet. Col. Lewis M. Colemon. 5 Virginia Batteries, 2 South Carolina Batteries and 1 Maryland Battery, Plus Masters Battery. Of course they were in Stonewall Jacksons Corp. I would like a discussion on this division. Were they indeed the hardest hitting division in the confederate army? What did the men that made up the ranks in these regiments say of themselves? Or there letters, diaries out there? Did you have an ancestor in any of these regiments? Did you have union ancestors that fought against them? What did they say about A.P. Hills Light Division? What are the regimental histories of these men? What does the union regimental histories say about them? What was thier position on the battlefields? What was the unoin positions that opposed them? Give your opinion of this regiment.



 Posted: Sun Jul 3rd, 2011 04:55 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
2nd Post
Hellcat
Root Beer Lover


Joined: Tue Nov 15th, 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 889
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Sorry Pender, I don't know enough of my family to say if any of them made up members of the division or even fought it. What I do know is that my mother has mentioned we have ancestors who fought on both sides as apparently in the past their were branches of her family that blamed each other for the war, at least one member fighting for the North and at least one for the South. I know my grandfather was in an Alabama unit, which I'm not sure. Someone in the family stole her copy of his records, think it was supposed to be the 6th Alabama Infantry though. For all I know I had some uncle or cousin in Pender's Division and  another going against them.

 

 



 Posted: Sun Jul 3rd, 2011 06:02 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
3rd Post
Mark
Member
 

Joined: Mon Mar 30th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 434
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

No question that as a division they were one of the best in the Confederate Armies--perhaps only rivaled on the Rebel side by Hood's division and Cleburne's division.

Mark



 Posted: Mon Jul 4th, 2011 02:13 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
4th Post
Captain Crow
Proud Southerner


Joined: Sun Jul 13th, 2008
Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma USA
Posts: 542
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

A.P.Hill=underrated as a division commander IMO.....unfortunately youthful indiscretions left him prone to chronic UTI's which severely compromised his health and adversely affected his ability to stay in the field.

Last edited on Mon Jul 4th, 2011 02:14 am by Captain Crow



 Posted: Mon Jul 4th, 2011 06:32 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
5th Post
sgtredleg
Life NRA, CW Trust, VFW member


Joined: Mon Jul 4th, 2011
Location: Arizona USA
Posts: 51
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Good Thread!
My relative, Cpt. William Jefferson Head, served as the "A" Company commander of Col. E.L Thomas' Regiment, under Brig. Gen. J.R. Andersons 3rd Brigade of A.P Hills Light Division.
Cpt. Head was with the Unit from the beginnings thru 3 July 1862, when he resigned for medical reasons. He fought the Yanks thru the entire Penninsular Campaign of 1862.
His unit was one of the few to penetrate the Union skirmish lines at Mecahanicsville.
The 35th Ga. was in the center of A.P. Hills attacks at Gaine Mill. Gen. Anderson reported 364 killed in the 35th Ga. during the Gaines mill assaults. (very hi losses).
Yes, for obvious reasons I am partial to the Light Division. But, I do think they were instrumental in the many successful operations of the Army of Northern Virginia.



 Posted: Tue Jul 5th, 2011 12:27 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
6th Post
pender
Member


Joined: Wed Jun 8th, 2011
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 148
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

At Mechanicsville, from what I can gather the Light Division faced union genreal McCalls third division of the federal fifth corp. In the front line of the main position along Beaver Dam creek were two brigades of the Pennsylvania Reserves under Brig. Gen. John F. Reynolds. In reserve was George Meades brigade also of McCalls division. The other two divisions of Porters corp were about three miles to the east at Gaines farm. McCalls division was supported by six batteries of field artillery. A.P.Hill ordered the light division to deploy into line and advance at about 3:00 p.m. Union pickets are driven back by Archer and Fields brigades. At 3:20 union batteries open on Fields brigade. At about the same time Andersons Georgians advance to the east to try to out flank Porters line. Archer and Fields men are exsposed to a murderous fire as they cross an open field toward Beaver Dam creek. There Reynolds with the first brigade were ready to meet them. Pender advances to the right of Fields Brigade and runs into Seymours third brigade. Lee orders Ripleys brigade of D.H. Hills division to support Pender. But he gets pinned down with Pender opposite Ellersons Mill a little after 6:00 p.m. So there is no way to flank the union on the right. But to the left, J.R. Andersons brigade succeeds in driving back the men of Reynolds brigade. Until reinforcements from Martindales first brigade drive back Andersons men. Branch had been trying to connect his line with Jackson. Greggs men were on the way. And would pay a terrible price at Gaines Mill next day. The light division plus Ripleys brigade suffered 1,484 killed and wounded at Mechanicsville. Most of it due to frontal assaults, however they are going to do it again on the morrow at Gaines Mill.

Pender



 Posted: Tue Jul 5th, 2011 01:29 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
7th Post
Mark
Member
 

Joined: Mon Mar 30th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 434
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

If I remember correctly troops from the Light Division actually captured BG Reynolds during that action. He got separated from his brigade and ended up a prisoner for a couple months before being exchanged. D.H. Hill remembered meeting with Reynolds shortly after he was captured and related the story of their encounter in Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. I think they were friends at West Point.

Mark



 Posted: Tue Jul 5th, 2011 06:53 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
8th Post
sgtredleg
Life NRA, CW Trust, VFW member


Joined: Mon Jul 4th, 2011
Location: Arizona USA
Posts: 51
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I'd say you have good info on the subject of the Light Division. Per chance do you have a descendent that was in A.P. Hills command?
I have always thought A.P. Hill performed at his best as the Light Division Commander, especially under Stonewalls strict guidance. However, toward the end General Lee did not have many options for Corps commanders. I suppose General A.P. Hill performed as a Corps commander, as well as could be expected, under the circumstances that the Army of Northern Virginia faced during the last years.



 Posted: Tue Jul 5th, 2011 10:24 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
9th Post
pender
Member


Joined: Wed Jun 8th, 2011
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 148
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

sgtredleg wrote: I'd say you have good info on the subject of the Light Division. Per chance do you have a descendent that was in A.P. Hills command? I have always thought A.P. Hill performed at his best as the Light Division Commander, especially under Stonewalls strict guidance. However, toward the end General Lee did not have many options for Corps commanders. I suppose General A.P. Hill performed as a Corps commander, as well as could be expected, under the circumstances that the Army of Northern Virginia faced during the last years. Sgtredleg, Nice too hear from another Light Division descendent. Yes I had nine ancestors that served in the Light Division. All in the sixteenth N.C. My G-G-G-G-G-Grandfather Joseph R. Hall enlisted at age 23, May, 1st 1861. And served thourgh out the war until captured at Hatchers Run on the Petersburg lines April 2nd, 1865. His brothers James and Elzaphan enlisted the same time as J.R. James was wounded at Seven Pines, then returned but was captured at Fredricksburg. Elzaphan was wounded during the Seven Days battle then died July 1st, 1862. Also J.R's wife's brothers(my uncles) served in this regiment . John, Stephen and William Collis. John was wounded in the Seven Days battle, Stephen being very young did not join the regiment until 1864. Stephen and John were both captured at Hatchers Run also on Apr. 2nd 1865. William was killed at Fredricksburg. My other ancestors in the sixteenth is Henry and James Allen. Henry was wounded at Seven Pines. James made it to Appomattox. He is the only ancestor of mine known to make it there. The last ancestor in this fine regiment is Nathaniel Allen, James and Henrys uncle. He enlisted on May 1st, 1861, at the age of 47. I agree with you 100% A.P. Hill was much better as a Division commander than corp commander. I think Hills sickness impaired him alot. I would say Hill, as Hood was out of thier element when they were not leading a division. But under Stonewall Jackson A.P. Hills Division is a power house. I think what historian James I Robertson said about Lee and Jackson, could also apply to Jackson and Hill. Though the Jackson and Hill fued seemed unrelentless. Robertson said Lee was like a great quaterback, able to see the whole field. And Jackson was like a great running back able to put his quaterbacks plan in motion. So could A.P Hill put Jacksons plans in motion. Pender

Last edited on Tue Jul 5th, 2011 10:32 pm by pender



 Posted: Thu Jul 21st, 2011 11:43 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
10th Post
pender
Member


Joined: Wed Jun 8th, 2011
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 148
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

One thing that may be interesting to the members of the board on the light division, is companies A and L of the 16th N.C. They were transferred to Thomas's Legion on October 5th 1862. They had went through the battle's of the Seven Pine's, Seven Day's, Cedar Mountain, 2nd Manassas, Sharpsburg and Shepherdstown. The men were from the counties of Jackson and Haywood. Thomas's Legion were formed to garrison the Blue Ridge mountain passage's into western N.C. They were made up of high lander's and cherokee indian's. The cherokee numbered about four hundred in thier rank's. The confederate battle flag of the legion is on display at the museum of the cherokee indian, in Cherokee N.C. If any one is passing by that way, check it out. Thomas's Legion fired the last shot of the war east of the Mississippi. Thomas is the only white man to serve as chief of the cherokee. Before the war Thomas lobbied hard in Washington for indian right's. If any one is interested in more on this legion see http://thomaslegion.net/ Pender

Last edited on Sun Jul 24th, 2011 02:11 pm by pender



 Posted: Sun Jul 31st, 2011 02:45 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
11th Post
rebelnc1987
Transplanted Tar Heel


Joined: Fri Jul 29th, 2011
Location: Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 9
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Hey Pender,

That is pretty awesome to have your family so concentrated in the 16th- very awesome unit. Just as a background on my relation to the Light Division- Firstly, years back, before I knew about my ancestors, I for some reason, was always drawn to the Light Division- W.D. Pender specifically. I really enjoyed learning about them and then when I did my geneaology, I found out why I was so into them. My GGG Grandfather was a private in company K 28th NC, William Hinson- he served from March 1862 through May 12 1864 where he was wounded and captured at  Spotsylvania- though no records of his imprisonment survive, I have been able to piece together through family stories that he survived his imprisonment (the CMSRs assume that he died in captivity since he never returned to his unit) and returned home after the war- he appears on census records until 1900. From what I know about William's records- he was at many of the major battles in the eastern theater and was a survivor of the Pickett-Pettigrew-Trimble Charge on July 3rd at Gettysburg.
My other GGG Grandfather, Jacob E. Gurley Co. E 37th NC, signed up late in the war at the encouragement of his brother-in-law, Kenneth Dees of company D of the 37th NC (who had 6 other brothers who served in various units one brother served in Company D as well but died of disease in the Summer of 62') and both of these men were captured on April 2nd at the Petersburg Breakthrough.

I have two 1st cousins who served in Company H of the 18th NC, James and Joshua Hinson.

I have other ancestors in many N.C. units. Including the nearest cousins, about 75 in all. So I tend to have a North Carolina bias whenever they are on the field.

But as for the Light Division itself- I feel that in many battles they played such a key role that is often forgotten by history, unjustly so, in my opinion. I think that A P Hill was a fantastic division leader and that Lee was just in promoting him for the Gettysburg campaign, but his corps leadership left much to be desired. But his Light Division was always up to par and ready to fight.

 For one example of being forgotten on the field, take Fredericksburg 1862. The assault on Marye's Heights gets all the history and publicity, when in modern life, little of that land still exists untouched. However, it was the Light Division that threw back Meade's attacking PA Reserves (one of the best Union units in my opinion). The situation was so dire on the southern end of the field and the Light Division was responsible for driving back the attack (although a misplacing of units left large gaps between brigades left a breach inevitable).

At Gettysburg, Heth's division gets all the attention for their early role in the battle and for their fight with Wadsworth's Division (not that it is not well deserved) but often forgotten is the charge of Scales and Perrin's brigades on day 1. And then on July 3rd- Pickett gets all the attention while the other non-Virginians are forgotten (again not meaning to step on any toes, Pickett's division was spectacular during that assault!)

The point I am attempting to make is that the Light Division's contributions are stellar- in each battle they were put into, they performed above and beyond the call of duty and often times are overshadowed by others. I suppose this is the fate of many units in history whose fighting capabilities are overshadowed by others and are largely forgotten. Although the following statement could make up its own thread, I also feel that Daniel's brigade is often a forgotten unit as well and that it's sacrifices go largely unattended.

As this post is getting rather long, I will end it by saying this, the war brought out many unsung heroes and I believe that the men of the Light Division are some of those men.



 Posted: Sun Jul 31st, 2011 03:05 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
12th Post
Mark
Member
 

Joined: Mon Mar 30th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 434
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

There are two battles that they do get the credit they deserve I think... they were widely acknowledged to have saved Jackson's hide at Cedar Mountain and then of course their famous forced march to save the day at Sharpsburg.

Mark



 Posted: Sun Jul 31st, 2011 03:26 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
13th Post
pender
Member


Joined: Wed Jun 8th, 2011
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 148
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Rebelnc1987, Have you got a copy of Michael C. Hardy's book on the 37th N.C. If not I would recommend looking it up on Amazon. It is a good look into the 37th N.C. I Agree with you that it look's as if the Light Division often get's over looked. I try to read every thing and every man associated with the Light Division. In my opinion they have some of the best leadership in the confederate army. Rebelnc, Here is a link you maybe interested in on the 37th http://www.petersburgbreakthrough.org/37thNC.htm

Pender 



 Posted: Sun Aug 7th, 2011 09:49 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
14th Post
pender
Member


Joined: Wed Jun 8th, 2011
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 148
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Mark, The forced march from Harpers Ferry to Sharpsburg by the Light Division. Is one of the high marks of the confederate army of northern Virginia. McClellan's attack on the left which saw ferocious fighting. Then after the failed attack shifting to the center. The fight there on that small country lane would forever be remebered as bloody lane. I can just imagine Gordon limping along the lane steadying his men with four bullet holes in his body before the fifth hits him in the face and takes him out. The screams of the irish brigade of the union rushing foward and being repelled. Then after enormous pressure the confederate line breaks. The only thing that stops the union on rush is Longstreet with some confederate artillery, and more than that the mortal wounding of Major General Isreal B. Richardson. So McClellan turns to the right. The union men of 11th Connecticut are forwarded first as skirmishers. Then the men of Sturgis's 2nd division. The confederates that opossed them were only a single brigade commanded by Brigadier General Robert Toombs. However they stopped the 2nd Maryland and the 6th New Hampshire of the 2nd division. Next came the 51st Pennsylvania and the 51st New York, they done it, they crossed the bridge and routed Toombs small force. Here Burnside began to consolidate his position on the far bank. The union men regrouped the forces of Christ, Welsh, Fairchild, Harland, Crook, Ferrero, Nagle and Scammon are now on the confederate right flank. Lee's reserves are gone there is no one left to put in. In many minds at this point in the battle the war is probably over. Lee is about to have his right flank rolled up. But as some ancient tale as Thermopylae or the battle of Issus UP CAME HILL. They had made a march of seventeen miles or you could say a run of seventeen miles. Hill drove them so hard straggler's lined the road. They deployed in the following order Archer's brigade, Gregg's brigade, Branch's brigade, Pender's brigade and Brockenbrough's brigade. Thomas's Georgian brigade had been left at Harpers Ferry to parole union pow's. Pender and Brockenbrough's brigade held the extreme right. Archer, Gregg and Branch advanced "with a yell of defiance" wrote Hill. They smashed into Rodman's division, Harland's brigade was particularly hit hard. Some confusion may have prevailed in the union ranks as ths soldiers in the Light Division, or many any way were wearing captured federal uniforms from Harpers Ferry. Now a route was beginning in the union ranks and would have more than likely countinued if the 1st brigade of the Kanawha division had not made a stand. The Light Division's counter-attack had won the day Lee's lines had held. One more point I would like to make is Lee still very heavily out numbered. But now with the Light Division chose to stay the next day and dare McCellan too attack. That attack never came. Yes Mark I also agree with you the Light Division is given much credit for saving Lee's army at Sharpsburg.

Pender    



 Posted: Mon Aug 8th, 2011 11:43 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
15th Post
Old Blu
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 16th, 2008
Location: Waynesboro., Virginia USA
Posts: 330
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Robertsons book on A.P. Hill indicates that A.P. was an extra ordinary man even under his handicap.  It appears he was a personal confidant to General Lee. They spent quite a bit of time together on the battle fields in private conversation.

On the topic of Cedar Mountain, my G-Grand fought in the 52nd Virginia Regiment which was on the extreme right in Early's brigade.



 Posted: Mon Aug 8th, 2011 01:18 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
16th Post
Old Blu
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 16th, 2008
Location: Waynesboro., Virginia USA
Posts: 330
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Here is a good review of A.P. Hill.  Enjoy.

http://www.aphillcsa.goellnitz.org/index.html



 Posted: Thu Aug 11th, 2011 12:04 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
17th Post
pender
Member


Joined: Wed Jun 8th, 2011
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 148
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Old Blu, I did enjoy the A.P. Hill web site. Our ancestors trod the same ground about 1862 around Cedar Mountain. Have you read Robert K. Krick's Stonewall Jackson at Cedar Mountain. Thought it was a very good book. Not only is it a good look at the Light Division there but also other confederate regiments. Plus the union regiments they faced.

Pender 



 Posted: Sat Aug 13th, 2011 04:11 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
18th Post
Old Blu
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 16th, 2008
Location: Waynesboro., Virginia USA
Posts: 330
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I have been looking at Krick's book but have not purchased it.  CWPT has excellent maps on that fight and I have been going over there taking some pictures.  I may order that for my next book.

Right now I am studying 2 books.  Robertsons book about A.P.Hill, which has shed some light on what was really going on in personal matters between Jackson and Hill at that time.  The other is Early's book.  My G-Grand and the 52nd was in his division.

Right now I am working on Early and his new Corp and their path and where they camped in their advance to Gettysburg.  Told the wife I need 2 days for that and am working on the maps laying out a plan.  I have a friend who is a guide there and I might be able to talk him into doing the Pennsylvania part.   Gathering this information for a slide presentation one of these days.  Been working 2 years, soon be 3 on my G-Grand for the family.

Oh, do I forever rattle on.  Sorry.:(



 Posted: Sun Aug 14th, 2011 03:57 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
19th Post
pender
Member


Joined: Wed Jun 8th, 2011
Location: North Carolina USA
Posts: 148
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Old Blu, The battle of Cedar Mountain has always been very interesting to me though I have never visted the battle field I would like to one day. Does the battle field at Cedar Mountain have the markers around the field that tells the regiment's position's and what they done? I know the Gettysburg and Sharpsburg battle fields do. One of the things that I like about Cedar Mt. is it is one of the only battle's where Stonewall Jackson got very excited. When Tallaferro and Garnett's brigade's and part of the famed Stonewall brigade are getting pushed back by the union brigade's of Crawford and Gordon. The light division arrive last. Thomas's Georgian brigade is sent to support Early and with the help of Thomas Early holds off Augur's attack through the cornfield. As the line begins to disintegrate on Tallaferro and a Garnett's front. Branch, Archer and Pender's brigade's begin to arrive. Old Stonewall gets excited grabs his sword to pull out and wave above his head but the sword is rusted in the scabbard. So he takes sword in the scabbard lifts and waves. Then he took hold of a confederate battle flag waded in among his men shouting with the sword in scabbard in one hand confederate battle flag in the other. Branch's men move into position were Garnett's men had previously been reestablishing the line. Archer and Pender move to support the Stonewall brigade. Here is what I have called a mystery at Cedar Mt. for me anyway. It has to do with Pender's brigade. In most of what I have read they almost always give Pender the iorn fisted blow that melt's away the union right flank. I know from study that Pender took time to position his men just right before the awesome blow. Here is my mystery the casualties list. As most know when an regiment is heavily engaged you can often tell through the casualties. Well at Cedar Mt. Penders casualties for his entire brigade is 2 killed 11 wounded 2 missing. Total casualties 15. The union men that Pender drove into the men of Gordon's division was the 2nd Massachusetts, 3rd Wisconsin, 27th Indiana, Zouaves d Afrique ( Collis's Co. ). Thier brigade's total casualties are 74 killed 191 wounded 79 missing. Total casualties 265. I know these men were engaged from the front some from Archer and the Stonewall brigade, but still. Was Pender's flank attack that decisive? One thing you may or not know Old Blu is the 52nd's casualties at Cedar Mt. I will give them either way in case you dont. 52nd Virginia 4 killed 12 wounded. Total casualties 16.

Pender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 Posted: Sun Aug 14th, 2011 05:39 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
20th Post
Old Blu
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 16th, 2008
Location: Waynesboro., Virginia USA
Posts: 330
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Pender, there are no markers around the Battlefield.
I use this for my help. sword.
-http://www.civilwar.org/maps/maps-listings.html?map_type=cwpt
 There supposedly is a marker where Jackson pulled his scabbard

The march was simply a fiasco due to communication from Jackson.  The more I read about him the more I see him as an a$$ hole as much as I hate to say it. That almost over rides his brilliancy.  He never had independent command again after this battle.

If you ever decide to come this way (Staunton), I will give you a tour of Battle of Piedmont, Cross Keys, Port Republic, Waynesboro, Cedar Mountian, Lexington, New Market.
Get a cup of coffee from the CrackerBarrel and then head out. The only place I won't go to without wheels is The Battle of McDowell.  I can't make a 3 mile hike up a trail anymore.

Oh, and thanks for the casualty numbers.

Blue




Last edited on Sun Aug 14th, 2011 05:41 pm by Old Blu



 Current time is 03:56 amPage:    1  2  3  4  Next Page Last Page  
Top




UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.4808 seconds (9% database + 91% PHP). 27 queries executed.