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 Posted: Fri Nov 10th, 2006 11:04 am
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Widow
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Howdy from NoVa, Fuller,

In your post on 7 Nov 2006, you asked

In your readings, have you read any regimental histories?
No, not yet.  Some of my books are about units, such as Lincoln's Cavalrymen (Edward G. Longacre, 2000) and The Army of the Pacific, 1860-1866 (Aurora Hunt, 1951 and 2004).  So far, my curiosity hasn't pulled me to the regimental level.

Couple of reasons for that.
  • First, I had no ancestors in the war, as far as I know.  Researching an ancestor inevitably pulls you into the documentation about his outfit.
  • Second, my home town didn't raise any regiments.  Heck, Laramie was built in 1867, so there's no Civil War tradition.  No commemorative statues, cemeteries, parades, ceremonies, etc.
So let me ask you in turn, Fuller.  Do you have a favorite regimental history?  What led you to it?

Thanks for raising such an interesting topic.

From one bookoholic to another, Patty



 Posted: Fri Nov 10th, 2006 01:34 pm
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calcav
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Widow,

Aurora Hunt's book was and is very special to me. Her chapter on the California Hundred and Battalion was one of the deciding factors in me writing my book on the 2nd Massachusetts Cavalry.

Tom



 Posted: Fri Nov 10th, 2006 04:37 pm
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Widow
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Tom, what's the name of your book on the 2nd Massachusetts Cavalry?  Patty



 Posted: Fri Nov 10th, 2006 05:32 pm
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calcav
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Bear Flag and Bay State in the Civil War: The Californians of the Second Massachusetts Cavalry.

I wrote an article on the Colonel of the unit, Charles R. Lowell. You can find it at this cool website called Civil War Interactive.

http://www.civilwarinteractive.com/ArticleGentleWarrior.htm

Tom



 Posted: Fri Nov 10th, 2006 07:41 pm
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Fuller
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Patty,

If you've read my other posts, I'm sure you've seen my interest with the Ohio 78Th.  I posted a link to their regimental history under the "Shiloh Letter" post.  I've read some on the 20th Ohio and the 124Th Illinois.  I am working my way to the confederate histories.  It's all very interesting to me.

Fuller



 Posted: Fri Nov 10th, 2006 08:17 pm
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Widow
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Wow, Tom, what a great piece on Lowell, the gentle warrior.

To think that he went chasing all over Mosby's Confederacy, right in my own neighborhood.  Oakton is only three miles from Vienna on Chain Bridge Road.

Even though Lowell wasn't involved in Mosby's fight with the 2nd Pa. Cavalry at Miskel's farm on 31 Mar 1863, you probably ran across an account of it in your research.  Here I quote from Mosby's Rangers, Jeffry D. Wert, 1990, p. 51.
Thomas and Lydia Miskel farmed a section of Loudoun County where Broad Run emptied into the Potomac River.  A young couple, with a son and a daughter, the Miskels toiled on land which had nourished Virgininians for over a century.  Their two-story L-shaped clapboard farmhouse dated from ca. 1750, with the wing added about 1810.  Behind the house a hay barn provided storage for the harvests and shelter for the livestock.
I'm not sure the farmhouse is still there.  But my hairdresser knows its location.  Her house faces the Potomac, only two blocks from where Broad Run joins the river.  She has a pond in back and keeps a couple of horses.  I told her that the Gray Ghost probably rode across her back yard when he escaped from the Miskels' place.  Maybe Lowell chased him across her front yard at one time or another.  Of course the whole area was excavated during construction of the house, but there may still be a few buttons or horseshoe nails down in the dirt.

One of your sources, Battledrums and Geysers: The Life and Journals of Lt. Gnstaves Cheyney Doane, Soldier and Explorer of the Yellowstone arid Snake River Regions, looks fascinating.  The Yellowstone and Snake are two of my favorite rivers in two of my favorite parks.

Now the Bear Flag and Bay State book, that sounds cool too.  Oh, dear, here I am thinking about buying more books!

Thanks for all this great info.  Patty



 Posted: Fri Nov 10th, 2006 08:55 pm
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calcav
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Patty,

Thanks for the kind words on the article.  Me, Lowell and the 2nd Mass Cav go way back.

Cheyney Doane had a fascinating life indeed. Check out this website for a short bio on him: http://www.lib.montana.edu/collect/spcoll/findaid/2211.html

For awhile the 2nd Mass was brigaded with the 16th and 19th New York, a pair of regiments that Mosby's men held in low esteem. The story was that if they captured one of the New Yorkers they would strip him of his equipment, kick him in the pants and tell him "go back and get more!" One day Doane and two companions had rode out of camp to a farmhouse for a meal. The others left back reporting that Cheyney was sitting beore a loaf of bread and a crock of butter and vowed not to return till both were finished. Riding back on his own he was captured by Mosby's men and when asked what regiment he belonged to he promptly answered the 16th New York. Sure enough his horse and equipment were taken, he was given the obligatory kick and sent back for more gear. He evaded imprisonment but was busted down to private and had to pay for the gear. :P

Tom

 



 Posted: Fri Nov 10th, 2006 09:39 pm
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Widow
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Tom, I guess you could say those NY boys doane learn very fast.  That kind of character had just what it took to explore the Yellowstone and Snake.

Me, I can't imagine spending my whole life sitting on a McClellan saddle.  At the Gettysburg muster in June, JD was telling us about the saddle.  I commented to Shotgun, "Dad had one, and it's not very comfortable for a nine-year-old girl." At that, Shotgun whispered in his growly voice, "It's not very comfortable for a forty-year-old man, either."

Dad bought the saddle in the early 1950s, Army surplus.  What, you ask, Army surplus cavalry saddles in the 1950s?  Yup.  Fort Warren, near Cheyenne, was an Army post with cavalry until 1939 or so.  Later it was an AF missile base.  Fast leap forward, hm?

Thx for the lead to the info on Cheyney Doane.  He got his bread and butter, though, so he probably didn't mind getting kicked in the rear.  Patty



 Posted: Sat Nov 11th, 2006 04:15 am
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Basecat
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Evening all.

Have read quite a few regimental histories in my day, and main reason why I like them is that they put the Civil War on a more personal level, as you are in the trenches and on the march with the common soldiers as they fought the battles.

3 of my faves in this category are:

"Irish Rebels, Confederate Tigers: The 6th Louisiana Volunteers, 1861-1865"  by James P. Gannon, 1998 Savas Publishing.

"The Pride of the Confederate Artillery: The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee" by Nathaniel Cheairs Hughes, Jr., 1997 LSU Press

"Covered With Glory: The 26th North Carolina Infantry at Gettysburg" by Rod Gragg, 2000 HarperCollins.

I could list more but these three are good starting points IMHO.

Regards from the Garden State,

Steve Basic

 



 Posted: Mon Nov 13th, 2006 03:39 am
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Fuller
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Tom,

Oh, "calcav" it makes sense now.  I will have to look into your article and your book!

 



 Posted: Mon Nov 13th, 2006 03:47 am
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Fuller
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Tom,

Oh, "calcav" it makes sense now.  I will have to look into your article and your book!

 



 Posted: Tue Nov 14th, 2006 01:12 am
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Sarah Elizabeth
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This is a question to anyone who may have some information for me about a particular regiment...

When I was a child, I spent a lot of time at my grandparents' vacation home in northeast Pennsylvania.  I remember my grandfather taking me for some grand cemetery tours across the river in New York.  I know we drove through Port Jervis, NY and through the surrounding areas.  Anyway, I recall my grandfather telling me about the Orange Blossom regiment and I know we visited numerous gravesites of soldiers.

My question is regarding the Orange Blossoms.  Does anyone know the official number of that regiment?  Also, is there a good book or other info related to this regiment available?

Any help in answering my questions is greatly appreciated!

Sarah



 Posted: Tue Nov 14th, 2006 01:30 am
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Doc C
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I believe the orange blossums and the 124th New York were one and the same.

Doc C



 Posted: Tue Nov 14th, 2006 02:17 am
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Fuller
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I second his notion.



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