Civil War Interactive Discussion Board Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register


new member/thanks for replies/ - Introductions - About this Forum - Start Here - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
 Moderated by: javal1
 New Topic   Reply   Printer Friendly 
 Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Thu Nov 30th, 2006 08:09 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
1st Post
Dale
Member
 

Joined: Wed Nov 29th, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 8
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Thanks for your replies.  I have counted and read  more than  30 letters- some 4-6 pages describing camp life, troop movements, loading armaments abord the ship, Patrols to Fort Monroe, Camp Martin (?), Passing a large encampment of rebel white canvas tents on the banks of the Potomac without being fired upon,  raising money to pay the Doddsworth's band- a suggestion made by their Capt., encountering an "old darkie" coming into camp at night, drunken Engineer falling overboard and nearly drowning his saver in the process, retreats to the bridge at Bull run only to find impassable as it was  littered with carts and carriages while being fired upon  as the men scrambled to the trees to return fire, lot's of great stuff.  The letters are well written and a joy to read.  There are many letters that pertain to Louis West Froelicks involvement with the N.Y. Sun newspaper that he was a part of and where  he published his writings.  These letters offer a very interesting look at the changes that were taking place in the newspaper business in NYC and across the country, and talks about   monied interests influencing what was written in other papers - a  sort of "body count" or gore  (not Al) cover-up similiar to that which took place in newscasts during the Viet Nam war, in order to keep up moral and support.   I have spent most of last night and all of today reading through the letters.

 Along with these letters are nearly as many letters  from Louis's son, Louis, a Princeton Grad and Newspaper man who resided in Tokyo, Peking, Shanghai, and other cities, recording his encounters in a very painterly manner.  Letters iclude, " A  REPORT OF THE WORK OF THE PEKING ARMY AND NAVY 1907-08,, Beyond this, there are pages and pages of Froelick geneology tracing back to the early 18th century.  A wise person,  probably a family member, has  secured these treasures well.  

So, that's what's new with me.  As you might tell, I am very excited and am enjoying myself.   So, I am taking inventory, expanding my understanding of what is here, and will ultimately have to conclude a value and a proper placement of the collection.   Any assistance will be greatly  appreciated.   Thanks, Dale



 Posted: Thu Nov 30th, 2006 10:29 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
2nd Post
Widow
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 19th, 2006
Location: Oakton, Fairfax County, VA
Posts: 321
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Dale,

I have no idea how it's done, but you might find it helpful to have a museum or library look at your material.  Many museums and libraries have collections of documents pertaining to one person.

For example, the New York State Library has some 60-odd boxes of the papers of Union General Gouverneur Kemble Warren.  They include personal letters, copies of his order books, reports, correspondence with other commanders, etc.  Also maps, some of his books from his cadet days at West Point, a Bible, etc.

Not only can a museum curator or librarian help you evaluate the material for insurance purposes, but also to tell you the significance of your stuff.  The owner may wish to donate his collection to such a repository, and perhaps receive a tax deduction.

I do hope there will be a way to preserve the documents and also make them available to researchers and historians.

Keep us posted!  We're all interested in this exciting development!

Patty



 Posted: Thu Nov 30th, 2006 11:06 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
3rd Post
Widow
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 19th, 2006
Location: Oakton, Fairfax County, VA
Posts: 321
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Dale,

One more thought.  Since you have the original documents, please wear white cotton gloves while handling them.  The oil from your fingers will speed up the deterioration.  If you can, put each sheet in a clear plastic sheet protector.  You can buy a pack of 100 at an office supply store.  Avery sheet protectors are "archival safe, won't lift print, acid free."

Patty



 Posted: Thu Nov 30th, 2006 11:43 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
4th Post
Dale
Member
 

Joined: Wed Nov 29th, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 8
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

 

Hello Patty,  Thanks for the advice.  Fortunately, the letters were copied using a typewriter sometime long, long, ago by the looks of the font used.   There were some dates on copies from the 1940's.  So, I don't need to handle them at all.  They were stored in file folders.  I have removed them and will place them in proper archival sleeves.  I posted in the new members column some more tidbits that I  culled from reading the letters and I listed some of the themes in that letter.

Are you a historian by trade or by passion? Both? Enjoy.

Thanks, Dale



 Posted: Thu Nov 30th, 2006 11:59 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
5th Post
Widow
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 19th, 2006
Location: Oakton, Fairfax County, VA
Posts: 321
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Dale,

Even though you're working with typewritten copies, that old paper will get brittle and deteriorate.  I just remembered that UV rays will cause ink to fade, so maybe you should try to keep them away from direct sunlight.  I saw a program on the History Channel about the Declaration of Independence.  One of the signed copies was framed and hung on a wall near a window.  The ink faded and there's not much left to read now.

No, I'm not a professional historian.  If I were, I wouldn't have time to read all those history books that I love!

So I guess I'm a passionate historian.  Hm.

Patty

 



 Posted: Fri Dec 1st, 2006 12:16 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
6th Post
Dale
Member
 

Joined: Wed Nov 29th, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 8
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Patty, I do have the originals and many copies of the typewritten letters.  Not to worry, thanks. Dale

P.s. I have just read a letter wherein Louis talks of touring the Smithsonian with a guard that snuck him in.  what a scoundrel!  He also speaks of an inspection of the ranks by the President and Sec. of State on the day following his letter to a friend.



 Posted: Fri Dec 1st, 2006 11:32 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
7th Post
Widow
Member
 

Joined: Tue Sep 19th, 2006
Location: Oakton, Fairfax County, VA
Posts: 321
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Dale, what a fantastic collection.  How I'd love to read those papers.  Every snippet that you've posted in here just screams out:  "Read more!"

Do you have any plans to scan them into digital format?  If you don't have a scanner, you might consider taking them to a store that can do it for you.  Maybe Staples or Office Depot.

If you do that, it would be helpful to supply a unique file name for each document, by making a list before you go.  That way you can work safely with them, and store the originals and copies where they can't be harmed.  For example, "Letter, original, 10/12/1862" and "Letter, copy, 10/12/1862."  I assume that a two-page handwritten letter might be just half a page in the typed copy.  I suppose the images would be put on a CD-ROM.

I've scanned many old and partially illegible documents which were brittle and discolored.  I used software that permitted me to edit the text before storing in final form.  Scanning software usually can't interpret strikeovers, handwritten marginal notations, clogged letters like "e," smudged ink or carbons, arrows in the margin that "move" paragraphs, coffee stains, paper-punch holes, foreign letters with diacritical marks as in French and Spanish.  Sometimes, if the typist literally cut and pasted paragraphs, the scotch tape or glue can deteriorate and discolor, making it impossible for the software to read.  Rust from staples and paper clips can confuse the software too.  It takes the human eye to figure out what the text really says.

You might be able to get some good advice from a librarian or antiquarian about the best way to protect and preserve both the originals and the typed copies.  I mean in respect to humidity and temperature control.

I have no idea if that material can be copyrighted by the owner.  Perhaps the librarian can give you some tips.

Keep up the good work.  And do please tell us more about that clever young newspaperman, as well as what you learn about preservation and protection of your wonderful documents.

Patty



 Posted: Sun Dec 3rd, 2006 11:55 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
8th Post
Dale
Member
 

Joined: Wed Nov 29th, 2006
Location:  
Posts: 8
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Hi Patty,  Thanks again for your great advice.  Have been in the dark for two day's as we were hit hard by the windstorm and fireworks, power has just returned to us.  So much to do... I'll take my time and get it done and will advise when things come together.  Copyright????  This brings up another angle that I hadn't thought about.  More soon. 

Peace, Dale



 Current time is 01:01 pm
Top




UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.3712 seconds (18% database + 82% PHP). 26 queries executed.