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Preservation is an eastern theater problem - Civil War Preservation - Civil War Talk - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
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 Posted: Sat May 5th, 2007 01:24 pm
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39th Miss. Walker
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Indy while most would agree that the Vicksburg's and Gettysburg's are major battles and rightly need to be preserved, there are many other sites that are in many ways just as important to the story as the major battles.

While not as glamorous, or not having thousands killed in battle, their story and preservation is important indeed.

If we only preserve the major battle sites we are turning our backs on the tens of thousands that died in service to their country who died in small skirmishes, or by disease. We are forgetting the small engagements and movements that sapped troops from elsewhere. We are forgetting the incidents that help make the "major battles" what they are today.

At many of the battle sites today there is no above ground physical reminder of the blood shed there, just rolling hills and if lucky an old farmhouse or two. Yet at the same time there are hundreds of earthworks and skirmish sites covering thousands of acres all across this country that are in danger of destruction from neglect, development or just plain forgotten. These too may not be major battle sites but still make up the fabric of the story of the war. Many of these earthworks and sites are untouched since the war, unlike much of the earthworks in major parks like Vicksburg and Petersburg, to say nothing of the many roads, paths and even visitor centers, some right in the middle of the battlefield!

Here in South Carolina very few earthworks or even battlegrounds are preserved or in the public domain.  Whole masonry forts like Castle Pinckney in Charleston Harbor lie dormant, slowly crumbling before our eyes. Many beautifully preserved earthworks are in danger and not even recorded. While I will agree they are not Gettysburg's, they are tangible evidence of the sacrifices by both sides in this conflict and deserve protection.

If one were to read your post the impression I get is only major battlefields need protecting.  And since according to your interpretation there are no major battlefields in South Carolina, then it really doesn't make a difference whether they are preserved or not. I certainly hope I am interpreting your post wrong.




 Posted: Sat May 5th, 2007 04:14 pm
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susansweet
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39th Miss.  what is there left at Honey Hill?  Is there anything to see?  I will be in Manning next fall.  This past year I visited as many places as I could find related to the Civil War while visiting my friends there.  The drive to find Fort Lamar was a comedy of errors .  We did find it though , got eaten by mosquitos. 

Even worse was trying to find Florence Stockade.  That is on the list to try again this next trip.  I have connected to the Friends of the Stockade and will go with one of them to see what is there hopefully.

 



 Posted: Sat May 5th, 2007 05:06 pm
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trench nerd
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In coastal SC most of the evidence of Federal Occupation is gone although there are many sites in Beaufort as well as Charleston associated with the war, and many buildings used by the occupying forces. Much of the battlefields are in private hands, same with almost all of the earthworks in the coastal areas. There are some you can drive to in the Beaufort and Charleston areas.

Coosawatchie and Pocotaligo were both "running" skirmishes and small battles and cover a large area. There again mostly on private property, but there are a few historical markers around. You can stop in at the KOA Campground in Point South and the owner can direct you to a number of visitable sites in the area. Take a good highway map for directions.

The vast majority of the Honey Hill battlefield and earthworks are on a private plantation. They are still in good condition, but other than a few historical markers there is not much to see on public property. You can see some of the earthworks from Hwy 462 but don't go off the road. I would estimate 90% of all existing sites are in private hands with no guarantee of protection.

Rivers Bridge is a State Park. A little out of the way but a really great place to visit. If you go on a week day you may be the only one there. Follow the signs to the Memorial grounds as well.

While everyone knows of Ft. Sumter an even better place to visit is Ft. Moultrie on Sullivans Island. Easily reached by car adjacent to Charleston. Good little museum and a good job interperating the fort and the siege of Charleston.



 Posted: Sat May 5th, 2007 09:17 pm
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susansweet
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I do like Fort Moltrie .  I have been there .  Edgar Allan Poe was stationed there the short time he was in the military.  Wrote Gold Bug with a setting on the island.

Went out to Fort Sumter the first time I was in Charleston.  So skipped it this last trip.  My friend was to go back there so I will see it again in the fall.  We did the Hunley, the cemetery and Battery Marshall where they sat sail.  Nothing left there . 

Did see the earthworks at Fort Lamar and drove all over Columbia looking at the homes, buidlings, churches as they have been restored.  Even went to Cottontown. 

Also went out to Boykin Mills but somehow we could not find the marker .  That's on my list to do again besides Susan that runs the broom factory is a hoot to talk to and I want to buy another broom. 

Beaufort needs  more time spent there.  We did go to Sheldon Church ruins that Black Jack Logan blew up.  The British had done the same thing in the Revolution.  You guys need to stop storing ammo in your churches. 

I did all the museums too.  Loved the Confederate Relic Room at Columbia. 

I think I spent a great deal of time in Graveyards visiting graves of Generals and Richard Kirkland . 

I will see about the two sites you mentioned.  Put them on my list.

Thanks

Susan



 Posted: Mon May 14th, 2007 02:15 pm
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39th Miss. Walker
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Susan, it wasn't really a matter of storing arms in the church. During the Rev. War a Torie, DeVoux who was with Prevost on his first invasion of SC had his men burn the church, which many were members of, as a sign of loyalty.
The second time was on the Sherman march, the union troops fired the church. There were no arms found at either time, although crypts were broken into looking for arms. I have never seen any credible evidence arms were ever stored there, although it is a good story.



 Posted: Mon May 14th, 2007 04:23 pm
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susansweet
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I was going by the stories I had read in doing my research for a trip to the area.  I did read about thousands of pounds of gunpowder confiscsated from a British ship Little Carpenter and stored in the Church.  That this soon became a common occurrence leading to Major DeVeaux in May 1779 to drstroy not only the church but also the Sheldon Plantation

Jan 14, 1865 General Logan troops  part of Sherman's March burned it again.  The source I read which I can't find right now said it was due to arms stored there  But then who knows.  I know tales that have been told about California sites that are just legends that people quote as true.

Either way it is a beautiful ruin



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