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 Posted: Thu Mar 6th, 2008 01:53 pm
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j harold 587
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I too would like to speak with Buford. He was a solder's general who looked after his men. He was also an old dragoon who realized other than scouting and screening calvary was most effective dismounted just using the horse for swift movement of troops.

In regard to taking care of himself I had pneumonia about six years ago. My physician (who is also into history) told me then that without antibiotics I would have suffered the same fate as Buford. 

Would also have like to talk with my g-grandfather who was with Sherman on the MTTS. I would like a common soldiers view point . I have 2 of his letters but other than small talk and the marching ond his work as a pioneer they do not offer alot of info. 



 Posted: Thu Mar 6th, 2008 04:39 pm
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ole
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Bet he'd have had some stories to give you nightmares.

Did he tell any to your grandfather or father? Second and third hand is better than none. Or was he one of those who prefered to be not reminded?

ole



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 Posted: Fri Mar 7th, 2008 02:29 am
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Rebel Yell
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I think that I would like to meet John Singleton Mosby and hear first hand about the 43rd Ranger Battalion. I have been fascinated by "the Gray Ghost" since boyhood.

From the Union side my subject to of choice would Winfield "The Superb" Hancock.



 Posted: Fri Mar 7th, 2008 11:34 am
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Don
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CleburneFan wrote: Come to think of it, I'd be grateful to have the chance to converse with anyone of any rank who was at Gettysburg, Shiloh, Chickamauga, First Bull Run, The Crater, Olustee, Antietam's stone bridge, the fall of Atlanta, Appomattox...actually almost any battle of the war would be instructive.

I'd even appreciate weird "Twilight Zone" things as having Traveler, Lee's horse, talk about the war from a horse's point of view. One of Custer's horses or J.E.B. Stuart's horses could tell some fascinating stories.


Cleburne,

I believe there's one of those out there, although it may not be in print any more.  It was by Richard Adams, the same guy who wrote the book about the rabbits ("Watership Down"?).  Must have been 20+ years ago that I read it, but I recall it being very thoughtful and entertaining.  Sorry, can't for the life of me remember the title.

 

 



 Posted: Fri Mar 7th, 2008 01:00 pm
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PvtClewell
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It's called 'Traveller' and it was printed in 1989. If you go to Amazon.com, I think you can get a copy starting at three cents and going up to $5.28.



 Posted: Fri Mar 7th, 2008 01:17 pm
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Crazy Delawares
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I would like to talk with Gen. Grant and Gen. Longstreet.

But I would most like to talk to my g-g-grandfather, James L. Marlin. The only thing that's been handed down to me that he talked about was, "He was proud of being a soldier. It's all I ever heard him talk about." My great-granduncle, who was 17 when JL died, knew him fairly well. He said he was always scared of JL. Unfortunately, I didn't know my great granduncle knew him until my uncle was well into his 80's. By then his memory of JL was fading.



 Posted: Fri Mar 7th, 2008 01:30 pm
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j harold 587
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Ole,

 Actually my mother indicated although he was very active in the GAR he did not talk much about his war experiences except with another neighbor who was an Andersonville survivor, and other vets.  He had to fight with surgons three times to keep them from amputating his leg. My mother could recall that it would open and seep blood and bone chips for the rest of his life.   He did receive a pension for his injury, and was a cooper and farmer untill his death.



 Posted: Fri Mar 7th, 2008 03:41 pm
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ole
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Thanks, j harold. I envy that closeness.

ole



 Posted: Fri Mar 7th, 2008 08:54 pm
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Kernow-Ox
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J - that's an interesting story. I've read several accounts of soldiers going to extreme measures to save their limbs: one cannot even imagine the power of the desire to keep oneself in one piece whilst in a field hospital.

I think there's several people I'd really like to talk to (I guess everyone gets Lincoln, by default). I'd like to ask McCellan about his hesitancy whilst in command, but doubt I'd get much out of him. Seward would also make for interesting political conversation.

However, I think I'd find just floating from campfire to campfire listening to the soldiers' late night conversations to be an education in itself.

Last edited on Fri Mar 7th, 2008 08:55 pm by Kernow-Ox



 Posted: Thu Mar 13th, 2008 02:11 am
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Johan Steele
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"Never go to the Angel of Death, nobody ever leaves the hospital whole."

An unnamed Sergeant to his new men. Man was a veteran of four wars on three Continents. Angel of Death was a nickname for the surgeon that dated back at least as far as the Revolution if not before... an apt nickname.



 Posted: Thu Mar 13th, 2008 02:24 am
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CleburneFan
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Kernow-Ox, interesting you should mention the extremes soldiers went to in order to save their limbs. I am reading a book now by Drew Gilpin Faust, current president of Harvard University, and a noted Civil War historian. She says that in those times people believed that it was vitally important to die "whole" in one piece. This was essential to the Good Death and being whole would make for a better after life.

Of course, anyone would do whatever they could to save a limb even today. But beliefs about what would become of mutilated corpses weighed heavily on the minds of Civil Wat soldiers for religious reasons.



 Posted: Thu Mar 13th, 2008 10:37 pm
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Kernow-Ox
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Johan - those are wise words, especially given what we now know about contemporary hygiene.

CleburneFan - the need to pass on to the next world in one piece is a recurring theme in history. In 18th/19th century England the corpses of executed criminals were often given to universities and medical schools for dissection as the belief was they could not enter Heaven without a whole body, thus providing an eternal punishment (these schools, of course, also had other ways of getting enough cadavers...)

Hmm...this should really be in the medicine category so to return to the topic I'll note that a discussion with an orderly about triage would also be handy. Until I am in such a situation (and I hope I never will be) I do not know how I could choose between who to save.



 Posted: Fri Oct 26th, 2012 05:47 pm
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Darryl
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Definiely JEB Stuart. He's always been one of my heroes and to speak with him would be tops.



 Posted: Mon Apr 8th, 2013 02:38 am
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PW Hess
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I'd go with these 3:

 

N.B. Forrest

U.S. Grant

Edwin Stanton

Attachment: Forrest.jpg (Downloaded 9 times)



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