Civil War Interactive Discussion Board Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register


Missourians and Kansans - Other People of the Civil War - The Participants of the War - Mikitary & Civilian - Civil War Interactive Discussion Board
 Moderated by: javal1 Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2   
 New Topic   Reply   Printer Friendly 
 Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Tue Aug 5th, 2008 02:17 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
21st Post
Maranda Jane Cockrell
Member
 

Joined: Thu Jul 31st, 2008
Location:  
Posts: 11
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Hi again, Texas Defender --- thank you so VERY much for sharing your expertise about Jesse James, the Civil War, and Texas history with me -- it is SO appreciated, as I would have taken months to track down the info you've provided.

I'm still a bit confused, but that is to be expected when trying to untangle the genealogy in that day & age.

It was VERY confusing a couple months ago - I'd happened across the name of my great grandmother, something I'd never known -- much less that her dad was the brother of a brigader general turned senator. LOL

It was VERY confusing researching JV, as there were literally dozens of Jeremiah Vardeman Cockrells.

Anyway, I although JV would probably be well acquainted with the James family, there were so many people in Johnson County who were related to Jesse James and to Cole Younger and surely everybody knew Quantrill -- but it does not follow that they participated directly in their activities.

I'm still intrigued with and curious about the idea of total families emigrating out of Missouri with Jo Shelby.

So you feel certain that Simon Cockrell is truly a different human being than Simon Wesley Cockrell, that's nice to learn.

Well, don't spend time here in this thread chatting --- y'all Texans got a big bad hurricane bearing down on you --- so spend your time & energy on serious preps for the onslaught of Nature.

Thanks again!

Oh, incidentally, I am open to any of my ancestors doing anything -- but JV, apart from lawyering & farming & being a judge & being a Congressman - he was also a Methodist Episcopal minister, and he is one of the original contributors to the college fund which ended up building Southern Methodist University -- so it's been a bit of cognitive dissonance occasionally seeing some of the stuff attributed to him, which probably is attributable to other men of the same name.



RootsWeb: COCKRELL-L [COCKRELL-L] COCKRELL, Joseph 1784-1837 VA>KY>MO
http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/cockrell/1998-02/0888410660



 Posted: Tue Aug 5th, 2008 02:21 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
22nd Post
Maranda Jane Cockrell
Member
 

Joined: Thu Jul 31st, 2008
Location:  
Posts: 11
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

I meant to share these two links to interesting accounts about the Battle of Lone Jack:


Behind Enemy Lines: Battle of Lone Jack
http://www.luftex.com/lonejack.htm


More on the Massacre at Lone Jack
http://genforum.genealogy.com/cgi-bin/print.cgi?melungeon::14427.html



 Posted: Tue Aug 5th, 2008 06:55 am
   PM  Quote  Reply 
23rd Post
Texas Defender
Member


Joined: Sat Jan 27th, 2007
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 920
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Maranda Jane Cockrell-

  You might be amused to read the following, because of who wrote it and who it was written about.

  This editorial was republished in the magazine FRONTIER TIMES, by J. Marvin Hunter, Bandera, Texas, June 1927, Volume 4, Number 9, pp.44-45.

                         ASSASSINATION OF JESSE JAMES, THE OUTLAW

(An editorial by Major John N. Edwards, Which Appeared in the SEDALIA (MO) DEMOCRAT, April 4,1882).                                                                               

  "Let not Caesar's servile minions,  Mock the lion thus laid low! Twas no foeman's hand that slew him, Twas his own that struck the blow."

  No one among all the hired cowards,hard on the hunt for blood money, dared face this wonderful outlaw, one even against twenty, until he had disarmed himself and turned his back to his assassins, the first and only time in a career which has passed from the realm of an almost fabulous romance into that of history.

  We called him outlaw, and he was, but Fate made him so. When the war came he was just turned of fifteen. The border was all aflame with steel, and fire, and ambuscade, and slaughter. He flung himself into a band which had a black flag for a banner and devils for riders. What he did, he did, and it was fearful. But it was war. It was Missouri against Kansas. It was Jim Lane and Jennison against Quantrill, Anderson, and Todd.

  When the war closed, Jesse James had no home. Proscribed, hunted, shot, driven away from among his people, a price was put upon his head- what else could the man do? He had to live. It was his country. The graves of his kindred were there. He refused to be banished from his birthright, and when he was hunted he turned savagely about and hunted his hunters. Would to God he were alive today to make a righteous butchery of a few more of them!

  There never was a more cowardly and unnecessary murder committed in all America than the murder of Jesse James. It was done for money. It was done that a few might get all the money. He had been living in St. Joseph for months. The Fords were with him. He was in the toils, for they meant to betray him. He was in  the heart of a large city. One word would have summoned five hundred armed men for his capture or extermination. Not a single member of the attacking part need have been hurt.

  If, when his house had been surrounded, he had refused to surrender, he could have been killed on the inside of it, and at long range. The chances for him to escape were as one to ten thousand, and not even that; but it was never intended that he should be captured. It was his blood the bloody wretches were after- a blood that would bring money in the official market of Missouri.

  And this great commonwealth leagued with a lot of self-confessed robbers, highwaymen and prostitutes to have one of its citizens assassinated, before it was positively known he had committed a single crime worthy of death.

  Of course, everything that can be said about the dead man to justify the manner of his killing will be said; but who is saying it! Those with the blood of Jesse James on their guilty souls. Those who conspired to murder him. Those who wanted the reward, and would invent any lie to concoct any diabolical story to get it. They have succeeded, but such a cry of horror and indignation at the infernal deed is even now thundering over the land that if a single one of the miserable assassins had either manhood, conscience, or courage, he would go as another Judas, and hang himself.

  But so sure as God reigns, there never was a dollar of blood-money obtained   yet did not bring with it perdition. Sooner or later there comes a day of vengeance. Some among the murderers are mere beasts of prey. These, of course, can only suffer through cold, or hunger, of thirst; but whatever they dread most, that thing will happen. Others then among the murderers are sanctimonious devils who plead the honor of the state, the value of law and order, the splendid courage required to shoot an unarmed man in the back of the head; and these will be stripped to the skin of all their pretentions, and made to shiver and freeze, splotched as they are and spotted and piebold with blood, in the pitiless storm of public contempt and condemnation. This, to the leaders, will be worse than death.

  Nor is the end yet. If Jesse James had been hunted down as any other criminal, and killed while trying to escape or in resisting arrest, not a word would have been said to the contrary. He had sinned and he had suffered. In his death, the majesty of the law would have been vindicated, but here the law itself becomes a murderer. It leagues with murderers. It hires murderers. It borrows money to pay and reward murderers. It promises immunity and protecdtion to murderers. It is itself a murderer- the most abject, and most infamous, and most cowardly ever known to history. Therefore, this so-called law is an outrage. And those so-called executors of the law are outlaws. Therefore, let Jesse James' comrades, and he has a few remaining worth all the Fords and Liddels that could be packed together between St. Louis and St. Joe- do unto them as they did unto him.

  Yes, the end is not yet, nor should it be. The man had no trial. What right had any officer of this state to put a price upon his head and hire a band of cut-throats and highwaymen to murder him for money?

  Anything can be told of man. The whole land is filled with liars and robbers, and assassins. Murder is easy for a hundred dollars. Nothing is safe that is pure and unsuspecting, or just; but it is not to be suppossed that the law will become an ally and a co-worker in  this sort of a civilization.

  Jesse James has been murdered, first, because an immense price has been set upon his head and there isn't a lowlived scoundrel today in Missouri who wouldn't kill his own father for money; and scond, because he was made the scapegoat for every train robber, footpad, and highwayman between Iowa and Texas. Worse men a thousand times than the dead man have been hired to do the thing. The very character of the instruments chosen shows the infamous nature of the work required.

  The hand that slew him had to be a traitor's! Into all the warp and woof of the devil's work there were threads woven by the fingers of a harlot. What a spectacle! Missouri with splendid companies and regiments of militia; Missouri with a hundred and seventeen sheriffs, as brave and as efficient on the average as any men on earth; Missouri with a watchful and vigilant marshal in every one of her towns and cities; Missouri, with every screw and cog and crank and lever and wheel of her administrative machinery in perfect working order; Missouri, with all her order, progress, and development, had yet to surrender all these in the face of a single man- a hunted, lied upon, proscribed and outlawed man, trapped and located in the midst of thirty five thousand people- an ally with some five or six cut-throats and prostitutes that the majesty of the law might be vindicated, and all the good name of the state saved from all futher reproach!

  Saved? why the whole state reeks today with a double orgy- that of lust and that of murder. What the men failed to do, the women accomplished.

  Tear the two bears from the flag of Missouri! Put thereon, in place of them, as more appropriate. a thief blowing out the brains of an unarmed victim, and a brazen harlot naked to the waist and splashed to the brows in blood!

 

  The editorial above was written by Major John Newman Edwards, CSA. Major Edwards was the adjutant of Confederate General Jo Shelby. At the close of the war, Edwards followed Shelby to Mexico, returning to Missouri in 1867.

John Newman Edwards - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

EDITING:  What I did not know in 2008 was that the opening lines of Major Edwards' editorial came from a poem by the famous poet W.H. Lytle.

Entertainment | Dr. Sphinx's Blog | Page 2


  William Haines Lytle was not only a famous poet, but also a Union general. He was killed in action at Chickamauga.

William Haines Lytle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  I find it strange that an ardent Confederate like John Newman Edwards would use lines from a poem written by a Union general, but according to the biographical story linked to above, other Confederates were also fond of reciting General Lytle's poetry.
 

 

                                                                                                                                                               

 

Last edited on Fri Apr 5th, 2013 01:41 pm by Texas Defender



 Posted: Fri Sep 18th, 2009 09:30 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
24th Post
Colonel Coffee
Member
 

Joined: Sat Sep 12th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 6
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

Col. John T. Coffee and his family joined Brig. Gen. Jo Shelby and left for Texas. Col. Coffee burned seven court houses in Missouri during his raids and one if them contained the titles to his land and those of his clients. He was an attorney in Polk County Missouri and formerly in the U.S. Army. He returned his regiment's  U.S. cavalry equipment to Lt. J.E.B. Stuart at Fort Levenworth Kansas at the beginning of the Civil War. 


Gen. Shelby and his Confederates left SW Missouri and came to north Texas, through Sherman, in  Grayson Co.,  Bonham in Fannin Co., and at Bonham, the Shelby Expedition took the Bonham - Jefferson Road. When Shelby's Expedition to Mexico arrived in Jefferson, all his able bodied men were given 1,500 Texas Enfield rifles, powder and ball from the Jefferson Armory before it was burned.  At Jefferson, the Shelby Expedition was joined by many political refugees and Confederate soldiers including Col. James C. Monroe's 1st/6th  Arkansas Cavalry, with my great grandfather, Pvt. Peyton Green Whaley in that regiment.  Monroe's 1st/6th Arkansas Cavalry reached the Taos Ferry on the Trinity River, about 25 miles NE of Corsicana, Texas. There  Col. Monroe's men  voted to turn back and return to their homes in Arkansas. However, Col. Monroe,  left his regiment and continued to Mexico with the Shelby Expedition. Monroe settled in San Luis Potosi Mexico and was killed three years later while attempting to break up a knife fight between two Mexicans. Monroe is buried somewhere in the Mexican hills.


As the Shelby Expedition passed through Waco Texas,Col. Coffee left his family with a relative and  went to Brownsville Texas after conferring with John Wesley Snyder in Georgetown, Texas. Snyder was a prosperous stockman and supplier of cattle and horses to the Confederacy. Snyder asked  Coffee to be his agent in Matamoros Mexico, across the Rio Grande  from Brownsville, Texas. Coffee was to be the agent for  cattle and cotton sales to European markets from Mexican ports in an attempt to continued the war under Emperor Maximillian of Mexico.   In the late fall of 1865, Coffee arrived in Brownsville  and he found the area to be in a complete state of anarchy.

In the  summer of 1866, after hearing of the  proposed amnesty to Confederates,  Coffee returned to Texas and surrendered to Brevet Gen. George A. Custer at the "Deaf and Dumb Academy" on the University of Texas campus at Austin, Texas. Col. Coffee returned to Waco and got his family and settled in Georgetown Texas,  in a home previously owned by the Snyder Brothers. John Wesley Snyder married John T. Coffee's daughter, Catherine Jane Coffee. In Georgetown, Col. Coffee remarried the fourth time to Mrs. Eunice Allen Vontress. Her former husband was State Judge and Capt. Edward A. Vontrees, Co. A, Maj. Charles Leroy Morgan's Cavalry Battalion, Gen. Richard Taylor's Division., C.S.A. Capt. Vontress was killed by a bolt of lightning in Louisiana during the Red River Campaign.

Col. John Trousdale Coffee was my great grandfather Joshua David Coffee's cousin. My great grandfather was in Lt. Col. Peter C. Hardeman's 1st Texas Cavalry Battalion - Arizona Brigade, C.S.A.  Joshua Coffee was detailed to picket duty at Colbert's Ferry on the Red River, north of Sherman Texas  and never saw any action.

 Col. John T. Coffee was the son of Joshua and Jane "Jenny" (Trousdale) Coffee. Col. Coffee's mother,  Jane  "Jenny" (Trousdale) Coffee was the daughter of Gov. William Trousdale of Tennessee. Gov. Trousdale was known as the "Warhorse of Sumner County" for his service in the Mexican-American War under Gen Zacary Taylor. Col. John T. Coffee's older brother, Benjamin Franklin Coffee, was in Col. Trousdale's 2nd Tennessee Dragoons and was the first American soldier killed at the battle of Monterrey, Mexico on September 26, 1846,. That date was the day before the battle of Monterrey offically began. Benjamin Franklin Coffee was killed by indirect artillery fire from the  Mexican "Saint Patrick's Brigade" or better known to American army as "The Irish Brigade of Catholic- American Traitors." 

Last edited on Fri Sep 18th, 2009 10:02 pm by Colonel Coffee



 Posted: Wed Apr 3rd, 2013 12:36 pm
   PM  Quote  Reply 
25th Post
Texas Defender
Member


Joined: Sat Jan 27th, 2007
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 920
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 

  back to top

  There certainly was: "Hard war" in Virginia, but in Missouri it was the hardest of all. What took place there had no equal for savagery and butchery anywhere else.

  The link below discusses the history of one county in Missouri from the mid 1850s to the end of Reconstruction. It includes the prominent part played by the family of Jesse James, and the persona of him created after the war to a large degree by former Major John Newman Edwards.

The Economist, 10/5/02 - Biographer T.J. Stiles


  Jesse James was killed on this date in 1882.

Jesse James - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Last edited on Wed Apr 3rd, 2013 01:26 pm by Texas Defender



 Current time is 06:17 amPage:  First Page Previous Page  1  2   
Top




UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.3224 seconds (10% database + 90% PHP). 26 queries executed.