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 Posted: Thu Jun 14th, 2007 09:01 pm
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PvtClewell
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Hey y'all,

Thought you might enjoy this.

I haven't yet followed through on the research, but my late uncle Ed Clewell left me a 52-page regimental of the 153rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, printed in Easton, Pa., in 1863. The binding is separating and some of the pages are not only yellowed, but worm eaten. It has a musty odor, but it smells of history.

At any rate, Clewell is not a particularly common name, and the unit was raised in Northampton County, which is right next to Lehigh County, which is where Allentown is located (and where I was born). Given those parameters, I feel fairly certain I can draw a lineage to the Clewells (my mother's sister married Ed Clewell).

Listed in the regimental roster, in Co. A, First Brigade, First Division, are privates Sylvester Clewell, William Clewell and Albert Clewell. Interestingly enough, the name Clewell is spelled "Clowell" in the book. But if you go to the Pennsylvania Monument in Gettysburg, which lists the names of every soldier who served in the battle from Pennsylvania, the very same names are spelled "Clewell." Go figure.

So I did the easy research. The 153rd was a nine-month regiment which belonged to O.O. Howard's 11th Corps. That, of course, humbled me. Their two major engagements were Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. In fact, they were mustered out shortly after G-burg on July 24.

The 153rd, in fact, was one of the first units struck by Jackson's flank attack at C-ville. I've read where the 153rd got off between two to three vollies before skedaddling in front of Stonewall.

At G-burg, they were posted on top of Barlow's Knoll (more correctly, Blocher's Knoll) before they were routed by Early's boys. The unit later reorganized in the defense of East Cemetery Hill, where they gave ground once again on the evening of July 2.

Sigh.

Barlow's Knoll, by the way, has a monument to the 153rd, which is where I first learned that a regiment had been formed out of Northampton County.

I console myself by saying the 11th Corps boys suffered under poor leadership and never really did have good defensive ground to cover, particularly at G-burg.

The Clewell's survived the war, as far as I can tell. They are not listed as killed or missing in the regimental. One of these days, I'll do the complete geneology, but it's not easy to do from North Carolina.



 Posted: Thu Jun 14th, 2007 09:38 pm
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PC -

You said it in a different thread - sure is a small world. My ancestors also served in the 153rd (Co.D). I've done much research on them, but never saw the regimental history you refer to.

A look at my ancestors can be found at http://union-westend-cemetery.blogspot.com/2006_12_01_archive.html . William and Charles were my GG grandfather and GG uncle. BTW - you may want to read the entire blog while you're there. Loads of info on the 153rd and other nearby units.



 Posted: Thu Jun 14th, 2007 11:15 pm
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PvtClewell
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OK Javal,

You're officially starting to scare me. In all my Civil War encounters, I've never come across someone else who had ancestors in the 153rd Pennslyvania — or at least admitted to it.

I have no clue where uncle Ed got that regimental. Its very thin, about the size of a notebook tablet. There was a typewritten index card in it that said, 'History of the 153rd Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers in Civil War. Please handle with tender, loving care.' There was a handwritten note underneath from my aunt that said, 'I think Ed probably got the book at a Clewell reunion.' Cool.

Uncle Ed has been dead about 20 years. Aunt Bea is still alive and kicking and living near Dorney Park, but she has little interest in the Civil War. She is the last relative I have in Pa.

There is a History of the 153rd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry published by Butternut and Blue, as a part of its Army of the Potomac Series (1996, ISBN 0-935523-55-3). It is mostly first-person accounts by officers and 'narratives of the comrades' which makes for some interesting if sometimes stilted reading. But the last 52 pages of the book are an exact reprint of the regimental that I have, including the complete roster. You might could find a copy at a NPS bookstore or Civil War show.

I neglected to add in my previous post that there are three more Clewells (spelled correctly) who served in Co. I — Cpl. Lewis Clewell (who has a small narrative in the book and datelined Bethlehem, Pa., which has me even more excited), Pvt. William F. Clewell and Pvt. Samuel Clewell. Lewis and Samuel were both taken prisoner at C-ville, while William was wounded at G-burg. Sounds about right, doesn't it?

After a quick perusal, I couldn't find any narratives from your ancestors in the book.

I checked the blog you sent. My great grandmother is buried in West End Cemetery. More Allentown memories



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 Posted: Fri Jun 15th, 2007 02:51 pm
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David White
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"I runs mit Sigel" ;)

These Dutch won't fight. Their officers say so & they say so themselves & they ruin all with whom they come in contact...  I would take a brigade to such a division. -- Francis Barlow

Hey there are worse Germans to be associated with like Himmler or ... hmmmm can't think of anyone else.

Just teasing guys!



 Posted: Sat Jun 16th, 2007 12:44 am
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PvtClewell
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Ha. That's pretty good, David.

To tell you the truth, I've been a little conflicted about the 11th Corps. They didn't exactly travel down Glory Road, you know?. Last year, while at the Civil War Institute in Gettysburg, during a free afternoon, my three roomates and I hired a Licensed Battlefield Guide and spent two hours on Cemetery Hill. I told him about my ancestors and asked him if I should maintain a low profile on this. On the contrary, he said, those boys saw the elephant. They were volunteers, after all, fighting for what they believed. I guess I knew that, just needed somebody with a LBG patch and a notebook to tell me that.

A few years ago, one of my CWI roomates, who is from Chicago, showed up at the CWI with a homemade T-shirt. On the back was a photo of himself standing in front of the equestrian statue of Franz Siegel, which I think is in Cincinnati. On the front of the shirt he had written 'Stonewall who?' and on the back, under the picture, he had 'I fights mit Siegel.' He actually wore it to a couple of seminars. I tell you, he had more XY chromosomes than I gave him credit for.



 Posted: Tue Jun 19th, 2007 03:16 pm
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David White
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Ed Bearss will tell you that "I fights Mit Sigel" is about his favorite Civil War song.



 Posted: Fri Jul 20th, 2007 06:07 pm
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Texas Defender
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PVT Clewell,

   Just in case you haven't seen it, you might be interested in viewing the tombstone of PVT Albert Clewell of the 153rd PA.

 

Pvt ALBERT A CLEWELL (1845 - 1932) - Find A Grave Memorial



 Posted: Sun Jul 22nd, 2007 10:27 pm
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PvtClewell
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TD,

SENSATIONAL!!!!

That was absolutely wonderful. Thanks for passing that on. From now on I'll only say good things about people from Texas, LOL. :D

One of these days I'm going back up to Pa. and do some serious esearch on the family. But that shoudl be a help. Thanks again.

PC



 Posted: Mon Jul 23rd, 2007 07:40 am
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Texas Defender
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PVT Clewell,

   You are lucky to have inherited that roster of the 153rd PA from your uncle.

   I have been sitting here wondering how the information from your uncle stacks up against one of my primary sources of information, the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System. This database has records of several million participants in the Civil War. It gives names, ranks, units, and histories of all the units.

   In your last posting, you: "Threatened" to do some serious genealogical research into your Civil War ancestors. So, just for fun, I decided to check out how many Clewells that I could find in the system. On the Union side, there were 43 listings. Of course, some are duplicate listings because people used different names and initials, and some served in multiple units. Of the 43 Union listings, 28 served in PA units. I'll list those for you:

NAME/INITIAL                    RANK (S)                      REGIMENT                         CO

Albert A.                               PVT                    153rd PA Inf                                A

Albert N.                               PVT                    153rd PA Inf                                A

Same person. His tombstone illustrated in my previous posting.

Augustus B.                        CPL/SGT              178th PA (Drafted Militia)           H

Christian                              PVT                    132nd PA Inf                              H

Daniel                                  PVT                     129th PA Inf                              C

Daniel (Maybe same)          PVT                      202nd PA Inf                             F

Edward                            3 Cl Musician          6th PA Cav

Edwin                                 PVT                      1st PA (3 mos-1861)                 A

Frank A.                             PVT                       119th PA Inf                             F

Franklin A.  (Same person)PVT                        119th PA Inf                            F

Joseph                              PVT                        47th PA Inf

Joseph (Maybe same)      SGT                        20th PA (Emergency-1863)      F

Joseph L.                         PVT                         132nd PA  Inf                               F

Joseph H.                         PVT                         19th PA Cav                            A/F

Joseph R.                         PVT/CPL                  82nd PA Inf                               E

Joseph R. (Maybe same) PVT                          18th PA (3 mos-1861)               F

Lawrence                        PVT                          129th PA   Inf                                C

Lewis B.                          CPL                           153rd PA  Inf                                I

Richard                            PVT                           2nd PA Cav                              G

Richard (Same person)   PVT                            1st PA Provisional Cav             G

RICHARD L CLEWELL (1819 - 1893) - Find A Grave Memorial

Robert A.                        PVT                           129th PA Inf                             C

Robert A. (Maybe same)PVT/SGT                     202nd PA    Inf                             F

ROBERT A CLEWELL (1833 - 1867) - Find A Grave Memorial

Samuel                          PVT                             153rd PA Inf                              I

Samuel J. (Maybe same)PVT                             198th PA Inf                             N

Sylvester A.                   PVT                             153rd PA Inf                             A

William F.                      PVT                              153rd PA Inf                             I

William H.                     PVT                               153rd PA Inf                            A

William H. (Maybe same)PVT                             178th PA Inf                            H

   On the Confederate side, I also found six listings, though I am sure that there are only two individuals represented in each case with three different names.

A.A. Clewell, AKA Aug., AKA Augustus A. was a PVT in Co. B of the 9th Bn of NC Sharpshooters, and also in Co. E. of the 21st NC Inf.

F.C. Clewell, AKA Frank C. was a PVT in the 1st Reg't,  MO CSA Cav and the 1st/3rd Consolidated MO CSA Cavalry.

  In addition, I found a gravesite of a fellow who died in NC during the war. The tombstone indicates that he was born in PA.

John David Clewell (1805 - 1862) - Find A Grave Memorial

  Here is the link to the CWSS, if you wish to examine it.

Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System

   So- if you ever decide to get serious about investigating these folks, you'll have a good starting point here. History will decide if I have done you a service or an injury.

:cool:



 Posted: Mon Jul 23rd, 2007 03:24 pm
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ole
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Them Clewells! Like rabbits, I tell you!

ole



 Posted: Mon Jul 23rd, 2007 08:44 pm
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PvtClewell
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TD,

Thanks again. You're doing a lot of the footwork for me. I briefly checked into ancestry.com, but dang, they actually want to get paid for their services. We fixed income types have to be careful what we spend money on. The other side of this coin is that I might like the chase of actually tracking down my ancestors on my own. I can't imagine that I'd have to go back more than just a few generations. I did talk to my aunt a few years ago, but she's 90-plus years old and couldn't remember much. Not a big Civil War buff, I guess.

Ole,

I prefer to think we're more like fire ants than rabbits. And we'll be in your neighborhood soon.



 Posted: Tue Jul 24th, 2007 12:46 am
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PvtClewell
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OK, we're rolling now.

I just called my aunt in Pennsylvania and apparantly I caught her in one of her clearer moments. I told her that I was doing a little checking into the Clewell branch of the family tree, that I'd just gotten back from Gettysburg and there were six Clewells listed on the Pa. monument.

"Oh, yes," she said. "Ed's father's name is on there."

"Do you remember his first name?" I asked, my heart in my throat.

"No," she said, and my heart sank. "But I have it written in our Bible. Let me check."

Moments later, she came back on the phone. "His name was William and he played in the band. I think he played the tuba."

I know I've had this conversation with her before but at the time, she couldn't remember anything. So I let it go figuring it was a dead end and that was that.

Anyway, I quickly ran to fetch my regimental of the 153rd Pa., and there is listed a Pvt. William H. Clewell, who played in the regimental band, Co. A.

So if Ed was my uncle, and William was his father, does that make William my great uncle, once removed? I'm not sure how that works. But for the first time ever, I'm 100 percent sure I've located a relative who fought in the war, and the two battles he was present for were Chancellorsville and Gettysburg.

My aunt went on to tell me that William fathered six sons and a daughter, so Ole was right, the Clewells are like rabbits after all. :P (Uncle Ed, for his part, fathered three daughters).

But I'm excited as all get out to have discovered this and y'all were here for it. Drinks all around, barkeep.

TD:
I may not yet be done with the list you provided. The photo of John David Clewell's tombstone is actually located just up the road from me in Salem Cemetery in Winston-Salem. I'll have to go look for it. I am curious about his death date — Dec. 13, 1862 —which, of course, is the battle of Fredericksburg. Because he was 58 years old, I wonder if that's just coincidental because if he was killed in the battle, he was apparently a 58-year-old private. Unlikely, but I guess it could have happened.

But again, thanks for your help, TD. You actually provided the impetus for me to call my aunt one more time and this time it paid huge dividends. Thanks a million.



 Posted: Tue Jul 24th, 2007 12:59 am
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ole
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Rabbit Clewell: Believe your uncle's father may be easier to categorize as your uncle's father. I can just see him cutting swaths through the advancing Rebs with his mighty tuba!

ole



 Posted: Tue Jul 24th, 2007 01:12 am
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PvtClewell
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Maybe he was a blowhard



 Posted: Tue Jul 24th, 2007 02:03 am
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Texas Defender
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PVT Clewell,

   Looking at the stone of John David Clewell, two things jumped out at me:

 

John David Clewell (1805 - 1862) - Find A Grave Memorial

 

   1) It says that he was born in : "Shoeneck, Penn."

   This relates to Richard L. Clewell and Robert A. Clewell. Both are buried in:

God's Acre Schoeneck Moravian Cemetery in Schoeneck, Northampton Cty., PA.

   Thus, there must be a family connection with John David removing at some point to NC.

   2) The people who made the stone were lousy at math. John David was born in 1805, and thus was only 57 years, 8 mos when he died.

   I think it very unlikely that he was a soldier at that age. Its not impossible, just very unlikely. I've read about some elderly cavalrymen, but he was older than Robert E. Lee. Perhaps you can learn more about him from the records of the cemetery itself.

   What might be more likely was that he was the father of some who might have served. North Carolina was a Confederate state, but some areas had folks favoring the Union. His offspring if any, likely favored the southern cause, but not necessarily so. The one Confederate Clewell in a NC unit was that Augustus A. Clewell. I would be interested to see if he was related to John David. I don't see any other Clewells buried around John David, but that doesn't mean that none are there.

   I would advise you to learn as much as you can from your elderly aunt whenever she is in a cooperative mood. She probably knows some things that you'll never be able to learn from anyone else. I would ask to examine the family bible. She might also be able to put you onto other sources of information.

   There are many, many possible resources that might help you in your search. Your relatives probably collected pensions and were members of the GAR. Besides their records, there are Census records, marriage and death records, etc, etc.

   I have helped a number of people find their Civil War era relatives that were long lost (or never known). Its apparent that you have an extraordinary number of relatives from this era to research if you ever choose to make a serious effort at it.

   They are all out there, waiting to be found.



 Posted: Tue Jul 24th, 2007 01:52 pm
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PvtClewell
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TD,

There are so many dynamics in play here it's almost overwhelming.

First off, my aunt said she would mail me a copy of what she has on the Clewells. The question is whether or not it's legible, because I think it's handwritten. And, of course, there's the worry about how good the actual copied product is. And whether she remembers to actually mail it. We'll see, and I'll keep you posted.

Secondly, I'd like to know if the other Clewells who served with William in the 153rd Pa. are related. Supposedly, they were all recruited out of Northampton County. Are they brothers? Fathers and sons? Cousins? No relation at all?

Thirdly, the fact that both Richard L. and Robert A. are buried in a Moravian cemetery is very interesting to me. Uncle Ed and Aunt Bea are Moravians. I myself am Moravian. My father, between stints as a high school English teacher, was an ordained Moravian minister (making me a dreaded PK). The fact that John David Clewell is buried in Salem Cemetery is extremely interesting, because it abuts God's Acre Cemetery in Old Salem, which is a Moravian community. I can't help but think there is a common thread to be found somewhere in all this. (I noticed the Schoeneck connection, too. If my German serves me correctly, Schoeneck translates into something like 'Pretty Corner').

Moravians are a small Protestant sect, similar, I guess, to Lutherans or Methodists, but I'm not clever enought to detect the differences. The regimental band of the famous 26th NC of Gettysburg fame was composed of Moravians from Winston-Salem. I might ought to check their regimental roster for Clewells.

I always thought the ties between North Carolina and Pennsylvania were unusually tight. Bethlehem, Pa. (where I grew up), and Winston-Salem, NC, were both founded and settled by Moravians. I think the connection has much to do with the colonial Great Warrior Indian Trading Path and the Great Philadelphia Wagon Path (both routes roughly trace current day I-81 from Pa. to Roanoke, then Rte. 220 to Greensboro, then I-85 to Charlotte and on to Georgia.) which essentially tied the two states together. The Bieseckers, Sinks and Everharts that can be found in Bethlehem are also here in Lexington. Daniel Boone's family, for example, migrated from Pennsylvania and settled just a few miles from Lexington on the Yadkin River. Interestingly enough, there are no Clewells in my phone book.

All of this fascinates me. You're a gem, TD. Thanks again.



 Posted: Tue Jul 24th, 2007 01:57 pm
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PvtClewell
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Ole,

When I was a child, my dad's nickname was 'Squirrel.' (Don't ask). Consequently, I was 'Little Squirrel.'

Now I'm 'Rabbit.'

I can't wait for my next reincarnation. I just hope I'm moving up on the evolutionary chain.



 Posted: Tue Jul 24th, 2007 03:41 pm
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Texas Defender
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PVT Clewell,

   Of the many sources available to family researchers, one of the best is to ride on the backs of genealogists gone before. As far as the Clewells go, here is a useful one:

As a member of the Clewell famil

Note the bewildering number of spelling variations of the name Clewell.

   This Lewis B. Clewell is the right age to have been the one in the 153rd PA Inf. The Schoeneck connection is there. Reading this should get your juices flowing. Click on: "HOME" at the bottom for another surprise.

   Another way to capitalize on the work of others is to find other families" genealogical work when your relatives married their relatives. Here is an example from the Miksch Family (More Moravians). Some of them married Clewells, whose names are cross referenced, along with their genealogies:

 

RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project: Miksch Family Tree. A Moravian-Brethren Family from Moravia

   Note the spelling variation on Elizabeth of Clewel.

   Another source is information written about the areas your relatives settled in. It often includes histories of the prominenet families in the area.

Northampton County Pennsylvania Collection - CD - (item 320138437737 end time Jul-23-07 09:03:10 PDT)

See #24 on the list.

   One of my favorite sources is cemeteries. Sometimes they have information on those buried there. The stones themselves might say something. Some other folks had to see to their burials. Also, relatives are often buried close by. Nowadays, they can often be contacted by e-mail, snail mail, or phone. The cemetery that Richard and Robert are buried in might be interesting. Here is another cemetery for example:

 

Schoeneck Moravian Cemetery - Northampton County, Pennsylvania

   Scroll to the bottom for more possible sources of information. WARNING: Some of those might actually expect to be paid for their services. <g>.

   It shows an Andrew F. Clewell and apparently some of his offspring. He was the right age to have served in the war, but apparently did not.

   Often, researchers find surprising movements made by their predecessors. For example, here is Frank A. Clewell, formerly of the 119th PA. Somehow, he became a member of the Nebraska GAR. Apparently, some of the PA boys went west- at least part of the way.

 

Denver Public Library: Western History Genealogy: Research Tools - Nebraska Grand Army of the Republic - C

   Finally, in my last posting, I forgot to include the realization that the PA listing included SGT Augustus B. Clewell. The Confederate in the 9th Bn of the NC Sharpshooters was Augustus A. Clewell. It might be a coincidence, but Augustus is not that common a name.

   It was common practice in those days for brothers to name their sons after their own brothers. I don't know how old either Augustus was, but both were probably in the generation behind that of John David Clewell (born in 1805). Thus, a way out theory would be that John David had a brother in PA who was also a brother of the father of Augustus B., and both had a brother named Augustus, etc. In this case, it would be possible for John David to be the father of Augustus A., and the uncle of Augustus B. Just speculating. <g>.

   Have fun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last edited on Tue Jul 24th, 2007 03:50 pm by Texas Defender



 Posted: Tue Jul 24th, 2007 05:08 pm
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ole
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Simply amazing, Texas. You make the Clewell Chronicles fascinating, even to me!

ole



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