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 Posted: Wed Aug 8th, 2007 02:32 am
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learjet45
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I have recently become very interested in Civil War firearms and had a question regarding Confederate 1860 model Colt Army Pistols.  Is it true that Colt actually made an 1860 with a brass frame, or was that only done by southern companies copying the Connecticut produced Colts of the north?  I've heard differing stories about the lack of steel in the south at the time...but why would that matter to Colt...with a northern production plant?  Thanks for any information.



 Posted: Wed Aug 8th, 2007 06:39 am
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ole
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learjet:

Colt may have made a few1860 Armies with brass backstrap and trigger guard, but most were all steel. Any real Colts in Confederate possession were pre-war purchases and indirect "requisitions." Confederate-made "Colts" from one manufacturer had frame components of brass. From another, the trigger guard and backstrap were brass. And the book I looked in mentioned the lack of steel.

 ole



 Posted: Wed Aug 8th, 2007 11:18 am
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Johan Steele
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Colts werre all steel; CS Colts were not and their quality was not on par w/ the Colt factory.  They were copies... some better than others.  At least the CS copies of the Colt were a decent weapon... the CS copy of the Sharps... shudder.

Here is a booklist that might help feed your new interest; it certainly isn't all inclusive but it is a start...

Barry, Craig L., The Civil War Musket: A Handbook for Historical Accuracy-Lock, Stock and Barrel,  Watchdog Press, 2006.

 

[size=Bilby, Joseph G., Civil War Firearms , Combined Books, 1996.]

 

Coates, Earl J. & McAulay, John D., Civil War Sharps Carbines & Rifles, Thomas Publications, 1996.

 

Coates, Earl J. & Thomas, Dean S., An Introduction to Civil War Small Arms, Thomas Publications, 1990.

 

Edwards, William B., Civil War Guns, The Stackpole Company, 1962.

 

Fuller, Claud E., The Rifled Musket, The Stackpole Company, 1958.

 

Fuller, Claud E., Springfield Shoulder Arms 1795-1865, S&S Firearms, 1986.

 

Houze, Herbert G., Colt Rifles & Muskets from 1847-1870, Krause Publications, 1996.

 

McAulay, John D., Rifles of the U.S. Army 1861-1906, Andrew Mowbray Publishers, 2003.

 

Reilly, Robert M., United States Military Small Arms 1816-1865, Eagle Press, 1970.



 

Smith, Graham, Civil War Weapons, KP Books, 2005.

 

Sword, Wiley, Firepower from Abroad The Confederate Enfield and the LeMat Revolver, Andrew Mowbray Inc., 1986.

 

Sword, Wiley, Sharpshooter: Hiram Berdan, his famous Sharpshooters and their Sharps Rifles, Andrew Mowbray Inc., 1988.

 

Whisker, James A., Hartzler, Daniel D. & Yantz, Larry W., Firearms from Europe, Tom Rowe Books, 2002.

 



 Posted: Thu Aug 9th, 2007 09:17 pm
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learjet45
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Thanks alot for the information.  I did some more reading and wound up buying a decently accurate(as far as I can tell) replica 1860 Colt Army in steel...no brass except for the trigger guard and around the front of the  pistol grip.  Thanks again for the information.  It was very helpful.  Can't wait to go shooting!



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 Posted: Wed Sep 12th, 2007 10:06 pm
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ole
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And, Bama, when reenacting, you can say with a straight face that you took it off a yankee. The Federals were the best source of quality weapons.

ole



 Posted: Thu Sep 13th, 2007 12:56 am
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Johan Steele
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Bama46 wrote: lEARJET,

You might also consider the 1858 Remington. Those were also copied by the confederate government using Much more brass than the original. Replicas are available in either Confederate configuration (Brass frame0 or Union (Steel). Tho my sympathies lie with the Confederate version,(I believe it is one of the most beautiful handguns ever produced)mine is the steel version. I bought the "Yankee" gun because I shoot it a lot and steel tends to be stronger than brass which can strech a bit under pressure of shooting.

Bama, I am unaware of a CS effort to copy the Remington, are you possibly referring to the Spiller & Burr which was actually a copy of the Whitney Navy.  IIRC there was something like 2000 made between 62-65.  Their finish left a lot to be desired but I'm unaware of any complaints to their quality.



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